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November 23, 1990 - Image 118

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

TEMPLE ENIANU-EL

and

MIDRASHA-COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES

announces

COURSE OFFERINGS

MONDAYS, NOVEMBER 26-DECEMBER 17

ALIZA MARCUS

JEWS AND ISLAM

Special to The Jewish News

We will examine highlights of Jewish history within Islamic lands, the influence of
Judaism on Islam and vice versa. Special attention will be given to the Golden Age
in Moslem Spain and to Jewish-Arab relations at the present time.
Instructor: DR. IVAN STARR, Associate Professor, Department of Near Eastern
7:00-8:00 P.M.
Studies, Wayne State University

CONTEMPORARY JEWISH THOUGHT

An introduction to four of the thinkers who have shaped Jewish thought in the 20th
Century — Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Abraham Joshua Heschel and
Mordechai Kaplan.
8:00-9:00 P.M.
Instructor: RABBI DAVID FEDER, Temple Emanu-El

Non-Temple Members: $23 per class

Courses Meet At:

TEMPLE EMANU-EL

14450 West Ten Mile Road
Oak Park, MI 48237

For further information, please call

Temple Emanu-El at 967-4020 or the Midrasha at 352-7117

Make Your Special Moments
Unforgettable.. .

with the gentle, pleasing movement provided
by our GLIDE-R-MOTIONTm rockers by
DutAlier. Available in a variety of fabrics
and styles. In stock for immediate delivery.
Add comfort and beauty to your nursery

You're At
The Head
Of The Class

starting at 29997

Ottoman sold
separately.

HOURS: MON., TUES., WED., SAT. 9:30-6; THURS. & FRI. 9:30-9; SUN. 12-5
OAK PARK: 22130 COOLIDGE (SCHAEFER) AT 9 MILE
TUES., WED., THURS., SAT. 9:30-5:30 ROSEVILLE: 31770 GRATIOT (NEXT TO FARMER JACK'S)
MON. & FRI. 9:30-9; CLOSED SUN.
ROCHESTER: 1406 WALTON BLVD. (HILLS PLAZA)

ANN ARBOR: 200 S. MP IN

The Complete Children's Department Store, Where Kids Come First

Riddle

With a Subscription
To The Jewish News

Call: 354-6060

erica

THE JEWISH NEWS

The Jabotinsky Society of Herut
will present

A PRE-CHANUKAH MUSICAL PROGRAM

Israeli & English songs will be performed
by Cantor Barry Ulrych

We will also feature

HY SHENKMAN - A Radio & TV Host

Sunday, December 2, 7:00 p.m.

Light dairy will be served

Donation: $5.00

Jewish Community Center

Ten Mile - Oak Park Branch
WE WOULD LIKE TO INFORM YOU THAT
WE WILL HAVE A NEW YEAR'S DANCE PARTY
AT CONG. B'NAI DAVID
For tickets call:
Simon Cieck 5648-3073 Sam Hornung 557-1847

118

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1990

Is Borough Park
Hiding Something?

American Red Cross

Blood Services Southeastern Michigan Region

I

t is a neighborhood of
neat, red-brick multi-
family homes, a place
where young boys with dan-
gling earlocks chat in
Yiddish, where women
dressed modestly in long
skirts and blouses push baby
carriages as they buy fresh
bread, smoked fish and fruit
on 16th Ave. in the heart of
Borough Park.
Here, in the largest Or-
thodox Jewish community in
the United States, secular
interests are pushed aside in
favor of religious matters,
and dozens of yeshivas and
small synagogues sprout the
names of East European
Chasidic dynasties, rem-
nants of pre- Holocaust Jew-
ish life.
This quiet, unobtrusive
neighborhood, home to
almost 100,000 people, at
least 90 percent of whom are
devoutly religious, rarely
makes it into the news, part-
ly because life rarely
deviates from a pattern set
through centuries of re-
ligious and social tradition.
So when 3 3-year-old
Shulamis Riegler, six mon-
ths pregnant, was arraigned
Nov. 13 on charges of second-
degree murder in the death
of her 8-year-old son,
allegedly from child abuse,
the shock was great, the
grief widespread and, among
some the questions asked
were many.
"The problem is that you
don't know what the degree
of the problems are," said
Egon Mayer, a sociology pro-
fessor at Brooklyn College
who has studied the com-
munity extensively.
"I'm willing to believe
there are not many in-
stances of parents killing
their children, but I'm not
willing to believe there
aren't more cases of severe
physical abuse of children
and spouses," he said.
On the quiet streets of
Borough Park, most people
refused to discuss the case
with a reporter, and those
who did spoke of the utter
uniqueness of the event.
"It's a terrible tragedy,
one that hurts everyone, and
whomever I discuss this with
feels the same way I do —
shocked," said a Borough
Park businessman, who ask-
ed that his name not be used.
"But it makes you wonder,
what's going on under-
neath?"

Yaakov Riegler, who died
Oct. 14 after falling into an
irreversible coma Sept. 29,
on the holiest Jewish day of
Yom Kippur, had spent,
along with his two older
brothers, three years bet-
ween 1986 and 1989 under
foster care, after his mother
was put on probation for
assaulting the oldest child,
13-year-old Israel.
Last year, the children
were returned to their
parents for reasons that
have not been made public,
and during the past year, ac-
cording to local news
reports, teachers at
Yaakov's public school had
contacted the city's Human
Resources Administration
after seeing suspicious
bruises on the boy.
But in the overburdened,
underpaid ways of HRA,
contended Borough Park

'The problem is
that you don't
know what the
degree of the
problems are.

councilman Noach Dear, the
information was ignored,
reports were perhaps
falsified by disinterested
staff members, and a boy
died.
"Such abuse is not ram-
pant," Mr. Dear said em-
phatically. "To say we don't
have the problem of child
abuse, well, it's not the
magnitude it's being made
out to be."
The close-knit community,
where shopkeepers greet
their customers by name,
prides itself on being self-
sufficient, and privately
organized services include a
Jewish youth library, a
substance abuse help group,
organizations that feed and
clothe the poor and an am-
bulance service.
Families tend to be big —
it is not uncommon for a
young mother to have five or
more children by the time
she is 30 — and median in-
come in the neighborhood
was estimated at $13,000 in
one study, partly a function
of the emphasis of education
and religious observance
over material pursuits.
But people tend to be
suspicious of outside agen-
cies, both for religious
reasons and because a large
percentage of the population
are Holocaust survivors,
said community workers.
Community workers

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