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October 26, 1990 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FINE ARTS

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A Pleas* Surprise Ad
Discover That HERE IS A DIFFERENCE!' t I■


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Continued from preceding page

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78

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1990

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designed "Daddy Long
Legs," a spider with char-
coal eyes constructed from a
grill.
Also on display in the front
window is a work by Jo
Rosen, who uses watercolor
inks to produce colorful
works of cartoon-like
characters with heart-shaped
lips. Her creations include a
piece titled "Lovebirds Tell
Secrets of Romance" and
"Day Job," showing a man,
wearing sunglasses, made of
newspaper.
"That's my stockbroker
husband," says Mrs. Rosen,
who has been painting and
drawing for 30 years. "What
he does is the exact oppo-
site of being an artist."
Mrs. Rosen compares her
drawings to a coloring book.
She begins by making a
black outline of the figures,
then filling them in — often
with what have been her
favorite colors since
childhood, magenta and
midnight blue.

Deep, bright colors also fill
the stained-glass works of
Oak Park artist Marie Snell,
whose pieces have been
shown in New York,
California and France.
Ms. Snell, a devoted
Pistons fan, has been work-
ing in stained glass since
1955. On display at the Ar-
tists' Gallery is her piece
showing an African woman,
another of red flowers.
One of Terri Melnick's
favorite mediums in cor-
rugated cardboard, which
she uses to create old city
scenes.
"When you sell something,
it really makes you feel
good," Ms. Melnick says.
"It's nice to know somebody
enjoys your work."
"I learned to paint at my
daddy's knee," says Rhea
Schaefer, who has been
painting since she was 2. "I
think the high point was
when somebody in Paris
bought one of my works. I
mean if somebody in Paris
wants your painting . . ."
Ms. Schaefer has produced
a number of "electronic
photographs," which are
created using a television
and computer. Using colored
pencils, she also enjoys
drawing jazz artists.
Minnie Berman always
loved painting and drawing,
but it wasn't until after her
daughter married that she
began to devote herself full-
time to her art. "I finally
decided it was my turn," she
says.
Among Ms. Berman's
pieces is a painting, il-
lustrated with a purple hand
and a Star of David with

blood-red specks, reflecting
her visions of Dachau.
Ms. Berman describes
herself as "a very emotional,
spontaneous painter."
Joyce Gottlieb's sculptures
are on display at Temple
Israel and Temple Beth El,
in addition to her clay, cast
stone and glass works at the
Artists' Gallery.
Ms. Gottlieb, who also
works as a dental hygienist,
says "art is life. It's all en-
compassing." She often has
10 art projects going at once.
Ms. Gottlieb encouraged
her friend Ellamae Van
Buskirk — whose husband
was doubtful the gallery
would ever open — to con-
sider joining the Artists'
Gallery.
Mrs. Van Buskirk, who
has created some 600 pain-
tings, was delighted at the
proposal. She is close to her
works — which include a
series of milk maids painted
in pale whites, bright blues
and yellows — but says it's
time to sell them because

"we have no more storage
space."
Nora Chapa Mendoza is
one of the gallery's few full-
time painters — an artist
who actually makes a living
at her craft. Of Indian and
Mexican heritage, Ms. Men-
doza works in oil and acrylic,
often gracing her works with
mysterious forms that
cannot be seen at first
glance.
Her father was a house
painter who had little access
to high culture, but always
appreciated his daughter's
talents.
"He knew I would be an
artist," Ms. Mendoza says.
"But Fe never really knew
what that meant."
The idea of a group of 28
artists managing their own
gallery might sound surpris-
ing, Ms. Mendoza admits.
But all planning so far has
lead to a successful product.
"I know it's really amaz-
ing, all these people," Ms.
Mendoza says, "I look at it
as creating a piece of art." ❑

`Color Of Music'
At Borman Hall

The Jewish Home for Aged
Borman Hall Activities
Center will present artist
Harry Weinsaft's "The Color
of Music," a collection of his
work inspired by the music of
the great masters 3 p.m. Oct.
28.
Mr. Weinsaft will invite the
audience to visualize the col-

Harry Weinsaft

ors and images evoked while
recordings of classical master-
pieces are played by
Registered Music Therapist
Ellen Morehouse. Each of the
artist's paintings, especially
created for this program, will
then be unveiled. This pro-
gram is part of the Home's
ongoing effort to meet resi-

dent special needs and en-
courage utilization of in-
dividual skills.
Mr. Weinsaft works in a
studio at Borman Hall and
has developed his own work-
ing media, combining ad-
ditives with water-based
materials to make them com-
patible with each other. All of
the works are painted on
fiberglass epoxy and plex-
iglass using mixtures of
acrylics, watercolors and
various collage materials.
They are coated with epoxy
lacquer as a preservative.
Much of this artwork is bas-
ed on biblical themes and
stimulated by his love for
Israel. A permanent exhibit
of Mr. Weinsaft's work is on
display in the Borman Hall
lobby.
"The Color of Music"
presentation is open to the
community and there is no
charge. For information, call
Ellen Morehouse, 532-7112.

Readers Theater
Offers Stories

Short stories read by profes-
sional actors will be at
Readers Theater 3:30 p.m.
Oct. 28, in the DeRoy Theatre
at the Maple-Drake Jewish
Community Center. A com-
plimentary wine bar will
open at 3 p.m.
There is an admission
charge. For information, call
Readers Theater, 967-4030.

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