100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 21, 1990 - Image 208

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

S

1p

OSI Thwarts
Nazi Guard Entry

N

29117 NORTHWESTERN HWY.
SOUTHFIELD
357-4771

14 MILE & FARMINGTON RD.
SIMSBURY PLAZA
FARMINGTON HILLS' t
• '
'
4 # •
851-5559
• PRIVATE PARKING
EAST ENTRANCE OF SALON



Wish alPthetir ®
Friends and cuttoiners
kMost Happy and
jlealthy New Year!

4

ESTATE MOTORS

tiS

Mercedes-Benz

• Pick up & delivery for service customers.
road service anywhere in North America
• 2
• 4-yr. 50,000-mile bumper to bumper warranty
• Cars returned washed & cleaned after service
• Free loaner

\

call RICK GOULD

464 S. Woodward • Birmingham • 644-8400

WHAT IS P'TACH?

Parents for Torah for All Children.
"P'TACH," is a national non-profit
organization which provides secular and
Jewish education for children with learning
disabilities who are enrolled in our schools.
Before P'TACH existed, the doors of
almost all day schools were indeed closed
to children with all levels of learning
disabilities, and the parents of these special
children were often frustrated by a
community that failed to recognize the need
for providing special educational programs
in our schools. Now, through P'TACH, the
doors of our schools are "OPEN" to all
our children.

The Michigan branch, P'TACH of
Michigan, Inc., was founded in May of
1979 by a group of parents, lay people and
professionals in fields related to special
education. Our main objective is to provide
special education for learning disabled
children with the goal of mainstreaming
them into regular classrooms whenever
possible. Today, P'TACH has grown to
serve over twenty children in its two
programs. Unfortunately, due to a lack of
financial resources, children are currently
on a waiting list to enter P'TACH's
programs.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
P'TACH of Mich., Inc.

18150 Alta Vista

Southfield, Michigan 48075

(313) 399-6281

All donations are tax deductible

208

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1990

You're At
The Head
Of The Class

With a Subscription
To The Jewish News

Call: 354-6060

THE JEWISH NEWS

BOWLERS NEEDED
for a
FUN COUPLES LEAGUE

Every Other
Sunday
5:30 p.m.
W Bloomfield Lanes
Call

Merryl 533-7427

New York (JTA) — Within
a period of five days last
week, the Office of Special
Investigations thwarted the
attempted entry into this
country by three men
suspected of having been SS
guards at concentration
camps during World War II.
The men, who tried to
enter the United States at
three separate points, were
not working together. OSI
director Neal Sher said the
occurrence of three attempts
in one week is unusual.
The men were stopped by
employees of the U.S. Im-
migration and Naturaliza-
tion Service, who saw their
names on the Justice
Department's "watch list" of
undesirable aliens suspected
of war crimes. The border
guards contacted OSI, accor-
ding to standing instruc-
tions, and were told to look
for the telltale blood-type
tattoo that SS guards had in
their left armpits.
Two of the men, who are
German citizens, were found
with the tattoos.
Gustav Raasch, who ac-
knowledged having served
as a guard at Majdanek, in
Lublin, Poland, tried to
enter Houston after flying
there from London. He was
returned to England.
Hans Weinem, who was
allegedly a guard at
Auschwitz, tried to enter in
Miami after a flight from
Frankfurt. He, too, was sent
back.
The third man, Eduards
Podins, a Canadian resident,
was detected in Vancouver
by employees of the INS who
work on the Canadian side of
the border. They stopped
him before he could board a
plane to Hawaii. Podins is
said to have been an SS
guard at the Valmiera con-
centration camp in Latvia.
The men are not known to
have been charged
anywhere with war crimes,
said Mr. Sher, but the OSI
has now provided all known
information to Canada and
will be -informing the Ger-
mans.
Mr. Sher said the number
of suspected war criminals
trying to enter the country
has increased in the last two
years because residents of
several European countries,
including Germany, are no
longer required to have
tourist visas to enter the
United States.
An average of six to eight
alleged Nazi war criminals
per month have tried to

come into the United States
in the last two years, Mr0.-
Sher said.
The three attempts last
week might be a result of
decreased travel fares from
Europe that take effect in
September, he conjectured.
But he doesn't think former_
Nazis believe it is now easier
to enter this country than
before.
"I think the word has
gotten out that if someone
has a Nazi background, they
will be stopped," Mr. Sher
said. "The clear message is
that Nazis come to the
United States at their own
risk, and we are going to
vigorously enforce" the pro-
cedure of screening and re-
jecting at the border those
with that experience.
Meanwhile, OSI has been
reaping a reward of informa-
tion on war criminals since
democratization swept over
Eastern Europe.
Of particular note has
been the cooperation from
East Germany. "We've got a
commitment from the Easi)
Germans, and this summer
we sent over five people to
scour the records, and they
came back with 6,000
names," Mr. Sher said. Mr.
Sher said OSI also has four
researchers in Czechoslo
vakia.
"We're very optimistic
that at a minimum we are
going to have many more
names to put on the Watch
List," Mr. Sher said. "We've
gotten the names of
thousands of camp guards, to
see if they are living here."

CLAL Offers
Lecture Tapes

New York — A series of lec-
tures that was formerly
available only to a select
group of American Jewish
leaders will now be made ac-
cessible to the community a
large.
CLAL, the National Jewish
Center for Learning an
Leadership, has chosen a
series of twelve lectures, en-
titled "Turning Points in
Jewish History," as the first o
several programs to be pre-
pared in audiocassette form.
The set of 12 forty-fiv
minute lectures is being of
fered at a cost of $50 per set
plus shipping and handlin
charges, through Dept. A10
CLAL, 47 West 34 St., Ne
York, N.Y. 10001.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan