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September 14, 1990 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I MEDIA MONITOR

"Empty the tent"

SALE

One Of A Kinds, Floor Samples And
Discontinued Quality
Home Furnishings
Under Our Tent And
Ready To Move At
Unbelievable
Prices!

111110.1"

111

ff

1/•••- ,_4

ARTHUR J. MAGIDA

TO

Special to The Jewish News

Gentleman's Chest.

43" x 16" x 46"H.
Value $1769.

Teak Nest Of
Tables.

Sale

$599.

Unassembled.
Value $154.

Sale $104.

3

Sally Chair.

50
To
Sell.

In Beech & Canvas.
Unassembled.
Value $199.

Sale

$129.

40
To Sell.

Sophisticated Off-White
Three Seat Sofa.

84" x 35" x 25"H. Value $925.

Sale

White Melamine
Dresser/Television
Cabinet.

$449.

With Beech Trim.
33" x 19" x 48"H.
Delivery And Setup Extra.
Regular $608.

Clearance

$149.

20 To Sell.

Lots Of On Site Specials!
Come Prepared To Buy Rain Or Shine!
This Friday, Saturday & Sunday, Sept. 14, 15 & 16 Only.

Only
At
Keego
Harbor
3325 Orchard
Lake Rd.
(1 Mile North
Of Long Lake
Road) 682-7600

36

house of denmark

CLF • R NCE

.0

e

(

Hours: Fri. 10-9, Sat. 10-5:30, Sun. 12-5

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1990

Seeking Israel's Role
In the Gulf Crisis

Featured Products Subject
To Prior Sale, Quantities
Limited, First Come First
Serve. Delivery Extra.

s the Persian Gulf
crisis continues, pun-
dits have been gaug-
ing how Israel fits into the
emerging new equation in
the Middle East.
One of the more alarming
suggestions comes from
Washington Post columnist
Charles Krauthammer, who
gives Israel the OK to do
America's dirty work —
wage war on Iraq — while
U.S. troops hunker down
along the Kuwaiti-Saudi
border and "contain" Iraqi
troops.
The United States and the
USSR, urges Mr.
Krauthammer, should agree
that Iraq "submit to inter-
national inspection and
dismantling of its weapons
of mass destruction" after
withdrawing from Kuwait.
Washington should an-
nounce, says Mr.
Krauthammer, that Iraq's
refusal to comply would be
considered "a sign of renew-
ed aggressive intent and
that the United States would
view any attack on such
weapons as an act of self-
defense."
"Israel would take the
hint," confidently says Mr.
Krauthammer, who appears
unruffled at the thought of
only Israeli boys dying for
goals shared by most of the
oil-consuming world.
Another interesting
scenario was advanced in a
Baltimore Sun op-ed by
Robert 0. Freedman,
graduate school dean of
Baltimore Hebrew Univer-
sity: This is "an opportune
time" for Israel to offer Pa-

Arthur J. Magida is a senior
writer at our sister newspaper,
the Baltimore Jewish Times.

lestinians an independent
state.
The "disarray" in the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization's leadership over
PLO chairman Yassir
Arafat's backing of the Iraqi
invasion means, says Dean
Freedman, that the
Palestine National Council
may "select a new leader
without Mr. Arafat's
credibility problems among
Israelis [who] would be ready
to make peace."

At "the very minimum,"
an Israeli peace offer "would
puncture Saddam Hussein's

Iraq's refusal to
comply would be
considered "a sign
of renewed
agressive intent."

pretense of being the future
`liberator of Palestine' and
strengthen U.S.-Israeli ties
by eliminating the central
issues — Israel's occupation
of the West Bank and Gaza
— dividing them."

But Samuel Lewis, U.S.
ambassador to Israel during
the Carter and Reagan ad-
ministrations, foresees little
chance of Israeli-Palestinian
talks soon. In a Washington
Post op-ed, Mr. Lewis con-
cluded that Mr. Arafat's
championing of Saddam
Hussein, and West Bankers'
cheering for the Iraqi
strongman "was all too
much for many of the most
idealistic- Israeli doves to
swallow. This was, after all,
the 'butcher of Baghdad,'
who only three months
earlier had threatened to
`burn half of Israel' with
poison gas . . ."

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