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July 20, 1990 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COMPARE ANYWHERE! ... IF YOU WANT THE BEST

ENTERTAINMENT I

GIVE US A TEST!

OPEN 7 DAYS-SUN.-THURS 11-10

I DINE IN & CARRY-OUT AVAILABLE 1

BROASTED .
OR B•B•C1
CHICKEN
FOR 2

AST-ED

I FRI:SAT. 11-13

O

rn

(N.1

to

a)

w

$895

0

0

118 SOUTH WOODWARD • ROYAL OAK

JUST NORTH OF 10 MILE NEXT TO ZOO

544-1211

QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY IS OUR PRIORITY!

THIS'S
CONRIMENTARY
DINNER MONTH!
CELEBRATE AT
THE ATRIUM CAFE.

What other
charit
wool

situp,

This month may not have a holiday—but
now you can celebrate anyway. We've declared
a Complimentary Dinner Month, just to get
a chance to meet you.
For a limited time, enjoy two delicious
entrees, but pay for just one.
And what entrees they are! Juicy
roast prime rib. New York sirloin. Grilled
Atlantic swordfish. Dig into the double-
thick lamb chops or savor our weekly
Chef's special menu. -
You'll love the Chocolate Marquis
for dessert—but you'll want to come back to
sample the Strawberries Rebecca. Celebrate
at the Atrium Cafe.



.

roll over,

For reservations call 879-6612.



;

,

ATRIUM CAFE

-

AT THE



.

,

GUEST QUARTERS'

.

•. -

SUITE HOTEL
TROY

In the Northfield Hills Corporate Center,
at the Crooks Road exit of 1-75.
879-7500

.

:. 411

75.

-

11111 1 111111111111111111 1 11111111 1 11111111 1 11111111 1 I I

11 1 1111111,1

Good at the Atrium Cafe
Restaurant for one
complimentary entree
with the purchase of one
entree of equal or
greater value.

Offer expires Sept. 30, 1990.
Sales tax applicable on total dinner value.

DJN 7-20-90

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItII IIII IIIIII11IIIIII1111I11111111I1%

and beg
for your
money?

The animals at the Michigan
Humane Society will do any-
thing for your support because,
for many of them, it's the only
chance they have.
Animals give so unselfishly,
they're begging you to do
the same.

Give to the Michigan Humane Sodety.
7401 Chrysler Dr., Detroit, MI 48211
Detroit

872-3400
Westland

721-7300

Auburn Hts.

852-7420

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354 - 6060

70

FRIDAY, JULY 20, 1990

Sondra Rubin Shines
On The Silver Screen

ADRIEN CHANDLER

Special to The Jewish News

I

t could be said that Son-
dra Rubin has gotten a
ghost of a chance. At age
71, Rubin, a local, semi-
professional actress is in the
midst of a career change —
from the stage to the silver
screen. Her big break has
come in her son Bruce's new
. film, Ghost, now showing in
Detroit and nationwide.
In the movie, Sondra por-
trays a nun soliciting money
for a homeless shelter — a
small but important on-
camera part that she plays to
• the hilt. "I did that scene in
one take,” says Rubin. "The
director, Jerry Zucker, loved
it. He laughed and gave me a
hug and a kiss. He told me he
would consider using me
again in another film."
So far, Rubin considers her
film debut to be her most
memorable part — a turning
point — and the start of what
she hopes will be more movie
roles. Not bad for the mother
of three — screenwriter Bruce,
47; builder-designer Gary, 43;
and Marci, 39, an artist and
mother — and grandmother of
nine who has been a familiar
face in local theater produc-
tions for 40 years.
Rubin's interest in theater
was a latent one. She didn't
start acting until she was 30.
She's not quite sure what
motivated 'her, but she was
struck with the idea that
she'd like to try out for a part
in a local theater group's pro-
duction of Mary Poppins. She
landed the role of the mother,
Mrs. Banks, and was smitten
by the limelight.
"You get butterflies before
you go on," she says. "But
having the audience applaud,
it's very exciting."
That debut was in the late
1940s. Since then, Rubin has
performed in more than a
dozen stage productions, from
popular to classical, many of
them at the Center Theater,
when the Jewish Community
Center was still at its Curtis
and Meyers location. She has
also appeared in a TV com-
mercial for Chevrolet and on
the old TV program, "Traffic
Court."
Rubin says she still loves
live theater, but definitely
has been bitten by the film-
making bug now. As a result
of her role in Ghost, she was
able to join the Screen Actors
Guild (SAG). Being a SAG
member will make potential
film and commercial work
much easier to obtain.

Sondra Rubin: actress.

Her son Bruce, who got his
mother the nun's part as a
way to "give her some
nachas," is working on yet
another film. Rubin says she
hopes to be in that new
production.
In the meantime, Rubin
manages to keep busy. She is
also an artist. Her home in
West Bloomfield, which she
shares with her husband of 51
years, builder Jim Rubin, 75,
is filled with paintings she
has done, including portraits
of her grandchildren. She
says she intends to keep up
with her artwork and other
hobbies while she pursues her
budding on-camera career.
Rubin didn't find the con-
version from stage to screen
very difficult. In some ways,
she says, movies are easier to
do. "For the stage, you have to
learn all of your lines at once.
With film, you shoot in
segments and there's not as
much dialogue."
There's also a different time
element in the filming pro-
cess. Rubin says she would
get hustled from wardrobe to
make-up to the set to just
wait. And wait.
But during that time,
Rubin was in acting heaven,
traveling in the same orbit as
the film's stars. She got to
ride to the set in a limousine
with Whoopi Goldberg, whom
Rubin describes as "a darling
woman, with a wonderful per-
sonality, very funny" and
"says four letter words like
they're going out of style."
She had her make-up applied
in the same trailer as Patrick
Swayze, was dressed by
handlers and protected by
bodyguards from gawking
crowds on the Wall Street set
in New York City. "I felt like
queen for a day." ❑

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