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February 23, 1990 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(

NEWS I

LAWRENCE LAX

BUILDING A FUTURE: Partner in Real Estate Interest Inc.,

Bloomfield Hills

CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK: Father and father-in-law are Allied

Jewish Campaign veterans. "The people around me created an
ethic to be involved in the community."

ORGANIZATIONS: Board member of Agency for Jewish Education, member of Shaarey

Zedek Synagogue.

ALLIED JEWISH CAMPAIGN ROLE: Associate chairman, Real Estate Division

ATHLETIC TYPE: "I like to run, play tennis and golf, and I play them well enough to enjoy it."

HOME TEAM: Wife, Melissa; son, Seth, 11; daughter, Liza, 6

EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME: 1987 Hadracha Mission

ge-DER42-,

e IX

to Israel. "I realized my direct line to 5,000 years of Jewish
history and the importance of my participation in maintain-
ing a strong Jewish community."

PARTNERS
FOR LIFE

. +C

SCUBA -* FUN -* WATERSKIING

RIDING .4(., TENNIS

SCIENCE

Maplehurs
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reiehr

SOCCER"

Family owned and operated for 35 years, Maplehurst
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where traditional values come first. Located on Torch Lake, north of
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for boys and girls ages 7-17. For an application, brochure or videotape, contact:

Dr. Laurence Cohn, Director
Camp Maplehurst
1455 Quarton Road
Birmingham, MI 48009 • 313-647-2646

spirit of play is fundamental.
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22

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1990

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THE

JEWISH NEWS!

Jewish Agency Opposes
HIAS Office In Moscow

Jerusalem (JTA) — The
Jewish Agency for Israel has
been actively seeking to
keep the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society (HIAS) from
opening an office in Moscow,
according to Jewish Agency
officials.
They believe that a BIAS
office in Moscow could
trigger a renewed spurt of
interest by Soviet Jews in
immigration to the United
States.
Simcha Dinitz, Jewish
Agency chairman, has ap-
proached the Council of Jew-
ish Federations and various
other Jewish organizations
in North America, in an
effort to influence BIAS to
forgo any plan to set up a
Moscow operation.
The United States had
been the destination of
choice for the vast majority
of Soviet Jews prior to Oct. 1,
when the administration
changed its refugee policy.
Since then, it has refused
to consider Jews who leave
the Soviet Union on Israeli
visas. With an annual U.S.
quota on Soviet refugees
now set at 50,000, the re-
quired American visas are
hard to come by. Therefore,
most Jews now leaving the
Soviet Union are settling in
Israel.
In New York, Karl
Zukerman, executive vice
president of BIAS, strongly
took exception to the Jewish
Agency's position.
BIAS is "not interested in
encouraging anybody to
come to the U.S.," he main-
tained.
Zukerman said he found it
"interesting that the Jewish
Agency Executive, which
made this decision several
weeks ago, has talked to all
kinds of organizations in the
U.S., but never to BIAS.
"If they had, we could have
explained to them exactly
what was going on, and their
concerns could have been al-
leviated," he said.
Zukerman said that the of-
fice BIAS hopes to set up in
Moscow would be designed
in a way that could not
possibly be construed as en-
couraging Soviet Jews who
might otherwise go to Israel
to hold out hope that they
would be permitted to em-
migrate to the United
States.
The office, he said, would
only assist Soviet Jews who
had already overcome a
major hurdle toward being
granted refugee status and
admission to the United

States: winning an inter-
view at the U.S. Embassy in
Moscow.
Such an office would not
exclusively be occupied by
BIAS, but would be shared
by all voluntary organiza-
tions that assist Soviets in
their immigration to the
United States.
"The Department of State
has asked HIAS to run an of-
fice on behalf of all the vol-
untary migratory agencies,
to assist persons who have
already applied to em-
migrate to) the United
States and have been
scheduled for interviews,"
said Zukerman.
In any case, Soviet au-
thorities so far have been

Jewish Agency
officials contend
that substantial
funds should not be
used for
resettlement of
Soviet Jews to the
United States.

opposed to the plan and are
"holding strong in their
refusals to allow any of the
voluntary agencies into
Moscow," said Phillip
Saperia, assistant executive
vice president of BIAS.
Because the voluntary
agencies are denied access to
Moscow, the U.S. govern-
ment and Jewish federations
are spending more on do-
mestic resettlement, Saperia
said, since the agencies
cannot provide U.S. com-
munities with advance in-
formation on refugees des-
tined to arrive there.

The Jewish Agency's stand
against a BIAS presence in
Moscow is taking place amid
increasing Israeli resent-
ment of the money from
American Jewish philan-
thropy that goes to HIAS.
Jewish Agency officials
have contended that
substantial funds should not
be used for the resettlement
of Soviet Jews in the United
States at a time when Israel
is strapped for funds for its
own resettlement effort.
Tension in the Jewish
Agency rose after reports
reached Israel from both
Washington and Moscow
that various Jewish groups
had begun lobbying the
Bush administration and
Congress to have the 50,000
ceiling raised.

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