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November 10, 1989 - Image 72

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PS

PAINTINGS BY:

GLASS BY:

CERJ
CECILIA MAYR
ANTHONY PETTERA
ENG TAY
ERIC WAUGH
ARSEN ROJE

JEFFREY JAMES
VACCARO

FINE ARTS

MARSHA and
KURT RUNSTADTLER

POTTERY BY:

METAL
SCULPTURES BY:

FRED MEYERS

POSNER GALLERY

32407 NORTHWESTERN HWY.
FARMINGTON HILLS, MI 48018
TELEPHONE: 313-626-6450

HOURS: TUESDAY-FRIDAY 11-5,SATURDAY 11-4
OR BY APPOINTMENT

ci o svvt

Barbar Keidan and Arthur Schneider with some of their works.

Contemporary Art

featuring...







Oils
Acrylics
Watercolors
Weavings
Pottery

• Sculptures
• Glass
• Paper
• Jewelry
• Christmas Ornaments

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113 N. Center
Northville, MI
349-4131

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Sat. 10:00 - 5:00
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72

FRIDAY, NQVEMBER 10, 1989

Unfinished Building Backdrops
Painter, Sculgtor's Exhibition

VICTORIA BELYEU DIAZ

Special to The Jewish News

n a few weeks, the situa-
tion will be all business
inside the ultra-modern
office building, Square Lake
Park II, in Bloomfield Hills.
But, starting Nov. 16, a part
of the three-story, not-yet-
finished structure will serve
as a most unusual art gallery.
That's when Birmingham
painter Barbara Keidan and
Franklin sculptor Arthur
Schneider open their "One
Man, One Woman" show
among the still-exposed
beams, joists, ductwork and
pipes of the building's
dramatic, light-washed
interio.
At the show — which runs
through Nov. 20 — Keidan's
flamboyant paintings of
dahlias, roses and other flora
will take their place
alongside Schneider's clean-
lined basswood cats and his
block-like, unembellished
nudes and other pieces,
sculpted in walnut and
cherry.
Although the relationship
betwen the two artists goes
back to their Central High
School days during the 1940s,
and their careers have cross-
ed in the years since when
both had work on display
simultaneously at places like
the Little Gallery, the show at
Square Lake Park is their

first professional venture
together.
The long-time artists seem
to be as excited about the
show opening as a couple of
neophytes looking forward to
their first exhibition.
"We are both really ready
for this," says Schneider, who
recently retired after 30 years
as an art instructor in
Deteroit Public Schools. "It's
really exciting. We're having
a great time."
How did the two artists hap-
pen to put together a show in-
side an unfinished office
building?
"We'd been saying, 'Let's do
a show' for years," explains
Schneider. "Finally, we just
said one day, 'Let's really do
it. "
A traditional gallery set-
ting was not a place of choice.
"We wanted to do it ourselves.
We wanted control of it. We
wanted a show that would
say, 'This is what we can do,'
and we didn't want to hold
back.
"So, where to do it? We look-
ed around, and had no trouble
finding office buldings with
plenty of space to lease."
But renting just any space
wasn't the answer, either. For
one thing, there was the mat-
ter of how and where to hang
Keidan's paintings, some of
which meaasure up to seven
feet across.
"Art can set up his work
any place, and it'll look

gorgeous," says Keidan, some
of whose work is part of the
corporate collections of Sinai
Hospital, the Novi Hilton, the
Kresge Eye Institute, and
others. "But, to hang my
paintings, I have to bang a lot
of holes in the wall. So, it
couldn't really be a building
where I'd ruin a lot of
beautiful, finished walls."
Enter Brad Schram, a
developer and family friend
who, along with partner Jack
Rosensweig, owns Square
Lake Park.
When Schram showed the
two artists the dramatic, un-
finished space looking out on
Square Lake, they knew the
search for the right spot to do
their first show together had
come to an end. The main lob-
by was finished, along with
the exterior of the building,
and heating and public
restrooms were installed.
And, Keidan noted, the expos-
ed pipes would be the first
place from which to hang her
large paintings.
rib make things even better,
Schram said he and
Rosensweig would provide
special lighting for the show,
and also donate the space.
The show features all new
works.

Though Keidan has worked
for years in watercolors (and
is past chairman of the
Michigan Watercolor Socie-
ty), she's recently begun to

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