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November 03, 1989 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

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12 MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

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Effective Annual Yield*

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This is a fixed rate account that is insured
to S100,000 by the Savings Association In-
surance Fund (SAIF). Substantial Interest
Penalty for early withdrawal from cer-
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change without notice.

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32

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1989

HOURS:
MON.-THURS.
9:30-4:30
FRI,
9:30-6:00

Israel-South African 'Expose'
Elicits Snores On Capitol Hill

JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

L

ast week's revelations
of an alleged Israeli
role in the de-
velopment and testing of a
sophisticated new South
African missile provoked a
surprisingly ho-hum
response on Capitol Hill.
And the general apathy
towards renewed charges of
Israeli cooperation with the
Pretoria regime was nothing
new.
In July, the same informa-
tion was revealed in con-
gressional testimony by a
representative of a pro-Israel
think tank. In testimony to a
House subcommittee, W.
Seth Carus, an arms pro-
liferation expert for the
Washington Institute for
Near East Policy, included
one line about the South
African-Israeli connection.

"Only a week ago," Carus
told the panel, "the South
Africans announced that
they had successfully test
fired a rocket booster.
Details are sketchy, but it
appears that the rocket
could be used as the basis of
either a satellite launch
vehicle or a ballistic missile.
Disturbingly, there are in-
dications that the rocket is
based on technology provid-
ed by a U.S. ally, Israel."
But Congress, preoccupied
with other matters and not
inclined to get into any new
wrangles with Israel or the
pro-Israel community, ig-
nored Carus' bombshell.
Last week, according to
sources here, the old infor-
mation was leaked by high-
level intelligence sources,
presumably as a ploy to en-
courage greater Israeli
flexibility in the bogged-
down peace process. "What

they are saying is, 'Hey, we
have this information, and
we're going to share it with
Congress and the media if
you're not a bit more for-
thcoming,'" said one pro-
Israel activist.
But that ploy may lose its
punch in view of the ap-
parent disinterest from
almost every quarter.
"There is a curious mood
with regard to Israel," said
one top congressional source.
"Congress just wants the
whole issue, with its atten-
dant pressures, to disappear.
The administration is focus-
ing only on the very specific
elements of its peace plan.
Nobody is looking for any
new hassles."
Another top congressional
staffer suggested that Con-
gress "has no illusions about
Israel," and was thus not
particularly disturbed by the
latest revelations.

CLAL Runs High•Level
Ed. Sessions On Hill

Jewish members of Con-
gress continue to get some
high-toned education from
the National Jewish Center
for Learning and Leadership
(CLAL). The New York bas-
ed group is currently in the
middle of a series of five
Capitol Hill seminars.
The most recent meeting,
hosted by Rep. Nita Lowey,
D-N.Y.; Rep. Henry Wax-
man, D-Calif.; and Sen. Joe
Lieberman, D-Conn., focused
on "the realities and
dangers of plural loyalties,"
according to Rabbi Lavey
Derby, CLAL's director of
program development.
Also in attendance were
Rep. Howard Berman, D-
Calif.; Rep. John Miller, R-
Wash.; Rep. Ted Weiss,
D-N.Y.; Rep. Steven Schiff,
R-N.M.; Rep. Gary Acker-

man, D-N.Y., and a host of
staffers.
"In general, the CLAL
method is to base the discus-
sion of contemporary issues
on the history of the Jewish
people," Derby said. "So we
use a lot of traditional texts
— Bible and rabbinics. By
and large, the discussions
have been extraordinarily
lively, on a high intellectual
level; it seems that the
minds of the members have
really been engaged by these
discussions."
CLAL, founded by Rabbi
Irving "Yitz" Greenberg,
focuses on preparing Jewish
leaders for the challenges of
the "new era" in Jewish
history, an era shaped by
growing pluralism and by
the continuing impact of the
Holocaust.

Rabbi Greenberg:
Capitol seminars.

New Refugee Center
Gets High Marks

The problems for Soviet
Jews seeking to enter the
United States are far from
over, but there are indica-
tions that the new
Washington Refugee Pro-
cessing Center is handling
the avalanche of applica-
tions under the new refugee
and immigration procedures
with unexpected efficiency.

"The real point is that
they have come through
magnificently," said Mark
Talisman, director of the
Council of Jewish Federa-
tions Washington Action Of-
fice. "Against all odds, they
are handling just an incredi-
ble volume of applications."
Initially, there were con-
cerns about several elements

of the new scheme, in which
applications from Soviet
Jews are all processed at the
suburban Virginia facility.
There were special con-
cerns about relying on the
mail; the U.S. postal service
wins few awards for its effi-
ciency, and the Soviet
system is even worse.
To test the system, au-

I

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