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August 25, 1989 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I PROFILE I

Michigan Ear Institute presents:

This Endures

Coping with
Facial Paralysis.

Continued from preceding page

the drawings of Levin's
students.
As the Nazis' power in-
creased, Levin and Monjau
faced repeated attacks and ar-
rests. Monjau was Catholic
and both his parents were
Catholic, yet because his
materal grandparents were
Jewish, Monjau was regarded
"a non-Aryan." He died at
Buchenwald.
Despite the constant terror,
Levin refused opportunities
to leave Dusseldorf. He
thought the Nazis would be
defeated.
He tried to lead a normal
life, meeting with friends in
the evening and working on
his art every spare moment.
In the morning, he donned his
beret and set off for work at
the Jewish day school.

A free lecture
at Providence Hospital.

Every year, facial paralysis strikes over 100,000 people. The
condition may be caused by Bell's palsy, tumors, strokes, or
surgery. Paralysis may result in difficulty in smiling, eye clo-
sure, or an overall -distorted appearance of the face. Some
people may have abnormal movements such as tics and spasms.
In this second annual lecture, Jack M. Kartush, M.D., a
nationally recognized surgeon and researcher in the field of
Facial Paralysis, will be discussing the recent advancements in
the field, including a new investigational drug to treat facial
spasms and biofeedback to assist in rehabilitation. Guest
speaker, Peter M. McCann, M.D., will discuss the treatment
of visual problems associated with Facial Paralysis.
If you or someone you love suffers from Facial Paralysis,
we urge you to attend this free and enlightening lecture.
Come join us on Thursday, September 14th, from 7:00 to
9:00 p.m. at the Providence Hospital Professional Medical
Building, conference room 8B, 22250 Providence Drive,
Southfield, Michigan.

B

Call 1-800-466-4343 today for your reservation.

© 1989 Providence Hospital, Southfield, MI.

MALTER FURS

PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
OUR 49TH ANNUAL

AUGUST
FUR SALE

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NEW SALON IN
THE CROSSWINDS MALL
FOR AN EXCLUSIVE
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M LTER

4fIrrie' INC.

CROSOSWINDS
MALL

DESIGNERS OF FINE FURS

Sale Ends August 31, 198 9

60

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1989

4301 ORCHARD LAKE RD
SUITE 419
WEST BLOOMFIELL MI

PHONE

626-0811

y his own admission,
Henry Leopold was
not an artist. Twice a
week for an hour he went to
Levin's class, "and I always
tried to get out of it."
The students used water-
color sets — "every time you
had a birthday you got one of
those sets" — and crayons.
They drew and painted the
whole hour.
Levin frequently assigned
his students to draw themes.
Once, he had the boys and
girls make illustrations for
Shakespeare's A Midsummer
Night's Dream. The life
of Moses and the Book of
Esther were other subjects, as
were sites around town.
One day, Henry drew a pic-
ture of the city of Dusseldorf.
Later, that picture would be
almost all that remained of
his school days in the city.
Drawn in bright blues, red,
yellow and brown, the picture
is included in the Art of the
Jewish Children collection.
By the mid-1930s, anti-
Semitic slogans were a corn-
mon sight on the streets of
Dusseldorf. On his way home
from school, Henry saw hate
posters everywhere. Signs on
restaurants read: "No Jews!"
He no longer rode the street-
cars, which were filled with
Hitler youth.
Leopold remembers the fate
of a non-Jewish neighbor who
had little interest in the
Nazis.
"The Nazis were always col-
lecting money 'for the poor' —
though, of course, it really
went to the Nazi Party. Near
our home, the Brown Shirts
would come around carrying
cannisters and asking for
money. They wanted people to
skip one meal each week and
eat pea soup and knockwurst
instead. They were to 'donate'
the money saved.
"One man refused to do it.
So the Brown Shirts dragged

him out onto the street. A
crowd of 200 people gathered
around. The police came and
took the man away.
"I saw him several months
later. I couldn't believe how
he had aged."
The Nazis' growing power
saddened and terrified
Henry's parents.
His father, a traveling
salesman who sold sport-
swear, had served as an officer
in the German air force dur-
ing World War I. Shot down in
France, he was held in a
prison camp. He was a
member of the German Of-
ficers' Club until the day he
left Dusseldorf.
"My father had a presence
about him," Leopold says.
"You didn't mess with him.
"I remember one time he
was on his bicycle following a
long convoy of (Nazi) army
trucks going about 35 miles
an hour. He was in a hurry, so
he tried to pass them. But the
first truck pulled way over to
the side of the road and he
couldn't get by. "My father

Henry saw hate
posters
everywhere. Signs
on restaurants
read: "No Jews!"
He no longer rode
the streetcars,
which were filled
with Hitler youth.

zoomed ahead, but it happen-
ed again. Then he heard a
loud siren. The sergeant of
the convoy began yelling at
him, 'What are you doing?'
"'Let me talk to your com-
manding officer!' my father
screamed back. The trucks
stopped, and he walked up to
the first car.
"He pulled out his card
from the German Officers'
Club. The sergeant started to
say something. 'Shut up!' the
commanding officer told him
when he saw the card. Then
he saluted my father."
Yet even that presence
could protect the Leopolds for
only so long. They realized
they had to emigrate. They
made plans to come to the
United States.
Julo Levin also was feeling
the dark cloud of danger des-
cend. He left his position with
the Jewish school and moved
to Berlin in 1938 to work as
a carpenter. There, he was
reunited with his friend
Mieke Monjau.
Monjau, who had promised
Levin's mother she would
look after the young Jewish
bachelor, brought food to
Levin. At night, she helped
him save his greatest
treasures.

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