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August 18, 1989 - Image 45

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BLENDING TOGETHER ALL SEGMENTS OF
THE REFORM JEWISH COMMUNITY

quirements were not simple
matters even for a Moses.
Let us remember that
Moses was not born the
altruistic individual he was
later to become. He was
raised in an alien environ-
ment, steeped in idolatry. He
was educated as an Egyptian
and divorced from his
parents, his people and their
tradition. And yet he never
forgot his roots; as he grew, he
reshaped his life in accord
with the noble mandates and
purposes of our faith. This is
what the rabbis were imply-
ing in their statement. Proper
conduct was a simple thing
for Moses because he made it
so by his actions, commitment
and by a program of self-
education in ethics and
morality.

Such a program is possible
for every person. See the end
of Moses' statement which is,
in effect, an explanation of
the beginning. We are asked
"only to fear the Lord." How
does one achieve that? "By
walking in all His ways. By
keeping His commandments
and His statutes?'
That is the purpose of the
entire regimen of the mitzvot
of Judaism. The understand-
ing and observance of these
rituals and commandments
enable us to refine our
natures so that we too,' can in-
tuitively select the proper
road in life from among all
the many alternatives..
The psalmist capsulized it
so well: "Teach me your way;
0 Lord, and lead me in the
straight path?'

Please Join Us. At Our

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, August 17, 1989

1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
TEMPLE KOL AMI

5085 Walnut Lake Road
W. Bloomfield, MI 48033
661-0040

Norman T. Roman

Established in

Rabbi

Ernst J. Conrad

1966

Founding Rabbi Emeritus

Affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations

SYNAGOGUES I

Intermarriage
Is Topic Of Talks

Machon Inbrah, the Jewish
Learning Network of
Michigan, is sporisoring a
statewide campaign titled
"Just Say No to Intermar-
riage."
The program is designed to
combat the rising rate of in-
termarrige in Michigan. The
campaign will focus on pre-
ventative measures through
understanding the problem.
Discussions are planned at
campuses across the state.
First in the series will be an
ice cream social followed by a
discussion titled "What's
Wrong With Intermarriage"
to be held 7:30 p.m. Aug. 28 at
the Machon Inbrah Learning
Center. in Oak Park.
Reservations are required.
There is a fee. For information
and reservations, call the
Machon office, 967-0888.

Braille Bindery
Needs Workers

The Braile bindery of Thrn-
ple Beth El needs volunteer
workers to help bind Braille
books for the blind.
Started in 1961, the
bindery handles more than
2,000 hard-cover books each
year. The books are publish-
ed in a number of languages
and are used in the United
States, England, Israel, India
and Africa. The bindery also
is responsible for binding text
books on all subjects for blind
students in area public
schools. The bindery binds

books in Hebrew and English
for the Braille Institute of
America and handles
religious texts for the blind of
all denominations.
Training is provided and a
knowledge of Braille is not
necessary. lb volunteer, call
the Beth El office, 851-1100.

Chabad House
Has Shabbaton

Michigan Chabad House
will hold a Shabbaton at the
Chabad Thrah Center of West
Bloomfield today through
Sunday.
Dr. James Brawer will
speak tonight on "The Scien-
tific Revelations of the Past 20
years, A Testament to the Im-
manence of God Within the
Universe." On Saturday, he
will speak on "What is a
Jew?' On Sunday morning,
the Shabbaton will meet at
Chabad House of Farmington
Hills, where Brawer will
speak t .9 a.m. on "Reality
and Its Shadows."
For information, contact
Rabbi Elimelech Silberberg,
626-1807, or Rabbi Chaim
Moshe Bergstein, 626-3194.

Rabbi Wine
Sets Talks

Rabbi Sherwin Wine will
describe the philosophy and
programs of the Birmingham
Temple and of Humanistic
Judaism 8:30 p.m. Wednesday
and Aug. 30 at the temple.
For reservations, call the
temple office, 477-1410.

B.H.

CAN'T JOIN US FOR THE ENTIRE
SOUL-TALK SHABBATON?

then come to

* BRUNCH WITH DR.JAMES BRAWER

Professor of Neuroendocrinology
at McGill University School of Medicine

TOPIC: REALITY AND ITS SHADOWS

Question and Answer
Period Will Follow Talk

Sunday, August 20
9:15 A.M.

BAIS CHABAD OF FARMINGTON HILLS
32000 Middlebelt Road

For more information call 626-1807 or 626-3194

*There is a charge
for - the brunch.

Boating & Swimming after brunch.

CAM
UNLIMITED

Sterling Heights

Sterling Place
37680 Van Dyke at 16 1/2 Mile

939-0700

Oak Park
Lincoln Center, Greenfield at 10 , h Mile
968-2060

West Bloomfield
Orchard Mall, Orchard Lake
at Maple (15 Mile) • 855-9955

Sponsored by:
MICHIGAN CHABAD

I.

• Bloom apb Bloom •

• Registered Electrologists •

Come and let us remove your unwanted hair problem and improve your appearance.

Near 12 Mile Rd. bet. Evergreen & Southfield

559-1969

Appt. Only. Ask For Shirlee or Debby

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

45

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