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July 28, 1989 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-07-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CAPITOL REPORT

5 Great Reasons
for coming to
Sherwood's 30 0/0 OFF
Upholstery Sale...

CENTURY • FLAIR • NICOLETTI
DIRECTIONAL • SWAIM

UJA Changes Focus
To Reach Young Donors

WOLF BLITZER

Capitol Correspondent

W

• Sale ends 7/31/89

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Ruth Schwartz, A.S.I.D., I.F.D.A.

Name
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UST BE Numbers

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45)76

Mail1NE. SCINNISN NOS Southtield,
20300 CMG Center Drive, #240

32 . FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1989

• FURNISHINGS
• COLOR
COORDINATOR
• ACCESSORIES
• INSTALLATIONS

FOR CONSULTATION CALL

352-2264

orking through the
Jewish Agency, the
United Jewish Ap-
peal has dramatically ex-
panded its social action pro-
grams in Israel.
Some $9 million in funds
are now being earmarked for
a range of new and innovative
projects in Israel that a
younger generation of
American Jews can more
easily identify with and
support.
This new focus may be the
result of a recently released
study on American charitable
giving that showed a
dramatic increase in giving to
a category of organizations
loosely identified as social ac-
tivist groups. According to the
New York Times, this this
category includes includes
various environmental, civil
rights, social justice and
women's organizations.
The UJA, the major fund-
raising arm of the American
community — clearly wants
to take advantage of this
trend.
Thus, $325,147 is being
budgeted for specific com-
munity development
outreach programs stressing
pluralism and humanism in
Israel. Young couples and
families, single parents and
singles, women and the elder-
ly are the targeted groups.
For the most part, they are
described as "secular" Jews
seeking a way to connect to
Jewish life.
Another $141,704 has
specifically been programmed
for various educational in-
stitutions in Israel that teach
democratic values, religious
tolerance, and social justice.
Tzofei Telem, a youth pro-
gram along the lines of the
Boy Scouts in the United
States that is associated with
the Israel Movement for Pro-
gressive Judaism, will receive
$269,824. And the Shalom
Hartman Experimental High
School in Jerusalem will
receive $100,000. It combines
a traditional commitment to
Torah with pluralistic values.
Conservative Judaism pro-
grams in Israel have been
slated to receive $304,737.
And the Beit Shmuel Interna-
tional Cultural Center, which
sponsors many programs to
promote Jewish culture, will
receive $271,764.
Funding is also being made
available to various projects
that promote Arab-Jewish
cooperation in Israel. For ex-

ample, the Kibbutz Hanaton
Educational Center will
receive $100,000 and the
Givat Haviva Youth Program
for Democracy will receive
$37,000.
The Women's Legal Center,
which seeks to create fair
treatment of women in
Israel's heavily male-oriented
society, will receive $54,000.
The UJA, in promoting
these new programs during
its 50th anniversary year, has
described them as part of its
"Prophet Motive" — to
underscore that this type of
giving is in the best service of
ancient Judaic prophetic
traditions of social justice and
concern for all members of the
society.
"We are going to actively
promote the existence of these
programs through a variety of
ways to bring them pro-
minently to the attention of
current and potential donors,"
a UJA fund-raiser said. "We
want to highlight the enor-
mous opportunities we have
to enhance the quality of life
in Israel today."

The UJA raises
more each year
than the American
Cancer Society,
American Heart
Association,
Muscular
Dystrophy
Association, March
of Dimes, and
National Easter
Seal Society
combined:

The UJA was established in
1939 shortly after
Kristallnacht in Nazi Ger-
many. Ever since, American
Jews have gathered in small
parlor meetings, at
synagogues, country clubs
and elsewhere to raise money
for Jewish causes in the
United States and around the
world.
Responsible, educated and
affluent, the American
Jewish community has been
remarkably successful. By all
accounts, it has given new
meaning in America to the
word philanthropy —
although the Jewish leader-
ship is far from satisfied.
Americans Jews have
become the envy of many
other American organiza-
tions involved in fundraising.
The Wall Street Journal, for
example, has reported that
the national UJA budget is

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