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July 21, 1989 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

FEET
HURT.

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Bright Lights, Big Winnings

Detroit apprentice electrician David
Silverman regularly supplements his
income with large bowling prizes.

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n the job, David Sil-
verman works with
electricity. Away from
work, Silverman lights up the
lanes as one of the area's top
amateur bowlers.
In April, Silverman, 30,
added the All-Events title of
the Michigan State Bowling
Association Tournament to
his list of credits.
The new state champion,
who finished second in
singles at the Battle Creek
event, had a pre-handicap
score of 2,067 for nine games:
three games each in the
singles, doubles and team
competition. He rolled a 737
series in singles.
In recent years, Silverman
has bowled for victorious
teams in several major
amateur tournaments which
have paid large cash prizes.
His accomplishments are
more impressive because
Silverman does not put bowl-
ing- ahead of his work as an
apprentice electrician with
ESI Electric in Oak Park,
where he arrives weekdays at
6 a.m. After work he rolls 50
to 60 practice games a week,
but that's down from the 100
he threw after graduating
from high school.
Would he like to have more
time for bowling? "I do wish,
but work comes first," he says.
Silverman lives a block
from Bowl-A-Rama Lanes in
Detroit. "I grew up in the
bowling alley, from fifth grade
on," he says. Around age 15,
his game "really took off."
At 17, he bowled in a top
area house league and
averaged 228 for the summer
season. Only one league
bowler, Bob Chamberlain,
topped that average, and he's
gone on to win professional
tournaments.
Bowling appeals to Silver-
man because "you don't have
to depend on anybody. In
singles, you control
everything.
"I like the competition." He
particularly enjoys match-
game events, where in-
dividual bowlers go head-to-
head. "I'm very intense," he
explains. "I'm a competitor."
When he is bowling, Silver-
man says, "My attitude
changes. My whole personali-
ty changes. Totally aggressive
. . . It just happens. I can
sense it. I'm aware that my
personality changes. I know

Silverman likes head-to-head battles.

once I put on my shoes, it's a
business.
"It's something fun, but
when you bowl in a tourna-
ment, especially if you're put-
ting up $500 (to enter), if you
lose one game, you get to go
home for $500. You've got to
make every shot count. One
bad shot could cost you 500
bucks. I like head-to-head bat-
tles."
Most of Silverman's major
paydays have come from the
term victories. In 1985, his
five-man team split $25,000
for winning the Shammy
Burt Tournament in Toledo.
But the best was yet to come.
In 1987, he and friend
Vince Imbier of Berkley —
who is now Silverman's coach
— entered the largest team
tournament in the world, the
Hoinke Tournament in Cin-
cinnati, which pays over $2
million in prizes annually.
They did poorly, but as they
were leaving the lanes that
Sunday night, they were ask-
ed to join another team to fill
in for two bowlers who had

cancelled. Since bowlers may
roll for as many teams as they
want, as long as they pay en-
try fees with each team, the
two agreed to enter and the
new quintet rolled the winn-
ing score — earning them
$10,000 apiece.
Silverman and Imbier plac-
ed third in the same event
last year with another team
thrown together at the last
minute.

Silverman placed third in a
734-man match-game tourna-
ment, the Hoinke Super
Classic, in 1986. He needed a
strike in the final frame to
earn a shot at the $50,000
first prize, but he left one pin
standing and settled for the
$10,000 third prize.
One of the bowlers he beat
in that event, Mark
McDowell, is now a profes-
sional and a recent Profes-
sional Bowlers Association
tour winner. Silverman beat
him 279-269. Thinking about
that win "gives me a heck of
a feeling," he says. "I kind of

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