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July 21, 1989 - Image 43

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WHY BETH SHALOM'S
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL?

wish I had a chance to bowl
against those guys."
If he had tried, could he
have been a pro? "Yeah,
definitely, without a doubt,"
he says. He regrets not trying
to make the tour, but feels he
is better off pursuing his pro-
fessional and earning money
in amateur bowling events.

"The people who make
money (on the PBA tour), I
call them Super Freaks.
They're unbelievable. Be-
cause the fellas that make
money are just a cut above
everybody else. It's very, very
tough. I have quite a few
friends who've gone out who
I thought were real, real good
bowlers — just haven't done
that well at all. I can stay
home and bowl on the week-
ends and make money."
Silverman generally bowls
one league at a time but
changes leagues frequently,
for variety's sake. He plans to
bowl this fall in a Redford
league which offers a $7,500
prize for the championship
team:
Silverman plans to bowl in
a match-play event in Penn-
sylvania over the Labor Day
weekend. If he does well in
Pennsylvania, he may bowl in
the High Rollers tourney in
Las Vegas in October. For an
entry fee of $1,000, bowlers in

the match-game event get a
crack at a $250,000 top prize.
But first round losers go
home with nothing.
During Thanksgiving he
will bowl the Hoinke Super
Classic, which now pays
$100,000 to the winner.
In head-to-head "combats,"
confidence is a key, says
Silverman. "You have to be
able to stay calm. A lot of peo-
ple lose their calm.
"When I was 15 years old I
was bowling all over the city
for money, going around and
bwling people — gambling. I
grew up, as far as the gambl-
ing atmosphere, betting on it;
it didn't bother me. I think
that was a little help. But I'm
used to head-to-head battles.
I like them."
Although Silverman has
rolled several perfect games,
he's never had a sanctioned
300. That remains one of his
goals. He'd also like to win
the $250,000 Las Vegas
tourney. But the competition
drives him more than does
the money.
"I like the money, but corn-
petition definitely outweighs
the money. The money's good,
but I like the head-to-head
combat, one-on-one. Because
you've got to be really tough,
you've got to be mentally
tough."

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DEDICATED FACULTY AND CLERGY

INNOVATIVE JEWISH STUDIES

Located at OAK PARK and WEST BLOOMFIELD

Non-Members Welcome

Contact School Office: 547.7972

David A. Nelson
Rabbi

A Phone Call May BeYour Best
Hope Of Getting Through.

Smoke Bomb Mars
Closing Of Maccabiah

DAVID LANDAU and
HUGH ORGEL

Special to The Jewish News

T

he closing ceremonies
of the 13th Maccabiah
at the Western Wall
were marred by the explosion
of a smoke bomb, an incident
which police said was pro-
bably accidental.
Though three people were
hospitalized following the ex-
plosion, the ceremonies con-
tinued without incident. The
ceremony in the Old City was
followed by a march through
Jerusalem.
The Israeli team marched
in victory, having taken first
place with a total of 258
medals.
The host country, with by
far the largest number of
athletes participating in the
Jewish Olympic-style tourna-
ment, topped its closest rival,
the United States, by a com-
fortable margin.
The Americans, who sent
520 athletes to the quadren-
nial event, the second largest
contingent, collected 199
medals in the seven days of
competition. At the last Mac-

cabiah in 1985, they took
home 246 medals.
The U.S. basketball team,
coached by Ben Braun of
Eastern Michigan University,
brought home a silver medal
after bowing to Israel 101-92
in the final game.
Canada trailed in third
place, with a total of 70
medals.
Most of the events took
place at the Ramat Gan
Stadium, near Tel Aviv,
though the closing cere-
monies were held at the
Western Wall.
There had been speculation
immediately after the smoke
bomb explosion that the bomb
had been planted by ultra-
Orthodox activists, who had
denounced the ceremonies as
a desecration of the Jewish
religious shrine and threaten-
ed violence.
The ultra-Orthodox objected
because both men and women
participate in the sports
events and because Olympic
games are the invention of
the early Greeks, who were
enemies of the Israelites.
An editorial in Hamodia,
published by the largely
Chasidic party Agudat

Cy Servetter
Education Director

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hest help for your teenager.

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