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July 07, 1989 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UP FRONT

I

1926

Rolex creates the revolutionary
Oyster case from a single block
of metal, and the world's first shock
and pressure-proof watch is born.

41/
ROLEX

THE TEST OF TIME

The Rolex® legacy of excellence is
perpetuated in contemporary time pieces
of incomparable elegance and durability,
each Rolex Oyster embodying an
unparalleled tradition of historic
performance.

1927

Mercedes Gleitze swims the English
Channel, a Rolex Oyster strapped to
her wrist, Swimmer and watch arrive
in France functioning flawlessly

1935

Auto .racer Sir Malcolm Campbell and
his Rolex Perpetual set a new world
record of 300 miles an hour.

1953

Sir Edmund Hillary becomes the first
to conquer Mt. Everest, relying on
his Rolex Chronometer.

1960

Dr. Jacques Picard descends a record
35,000 feet into the sea The Rolex
Oyster strapped to his bathyscaphe
records this historic event

Only at your Official
Rolex Jeweler.

1973

Tom Sheppard and his Rolex Oyster
endure searing heat and violent
sandstorms in a successful Sahara
Desert crossing.

1980

DAY-DATE
18kt. gold with
dial and bezel
set with diamonds
Presidents bracelet

LADY DAT EJ UST'
18kt. gold with
dial and bezel set
with diamonds
President bracelet

Balloonist Julian Nott times his
record 55,134 foot ascent on a
Rolex Oyster.

1986

Dick R utan, Jeana 'Yeager and their
Rolex chronometers complete
history's first non-stop, unrefueled
flight around the world.

LADY DATEJUSV
steel and 18kt. gold
Jubilee bracelet

DAT EJ UST'
mid-size
steel and 18kt. gold
Jubilee bracelet

JULES R. SCHUBOT

EMBE

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WE'RE NUMBER ONE!

14

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 1989

Protecting Uncle Sam

Continued from Page 5

yoal

a

11207E

neEd

127ofEs.5.ional touct?

Mix new with existing possessions

Wallcoverings
Window treatments
Furniture & accessories

Judith Trumbull
Designs
C47-58(14

at the Prime Minister. At that
point three other special
agents dove over the podium
from which the Prime
Minister was speaking,
grabbed the man with the
automatic weapon and literal-
ly pulled his left arm off. It
turned out that his left arm
was an artificial limb."
Mazer left the New York of-
fice after three-and-a-half
years and spent 14 months in
Chicago before becoming an
assistant regional security of-
ficer at the U.S. Embassy in
Cairo in January 1981. His
new responsibility was to pro-
tect American Ambassador
Alfred Atherton as supervisor
of a 12-man Egyptian detail.
"Wherever the American
ambassador went, from
sunrise to sunset, I was with
him," Mazer said.
Homesick for American
food, Mazer was grateful
when his parents surprised
him and shipped a half dozen
of his favorite pizzas and hot
dogs, frozen.
While in Egypt, Mazer met
President Anwar Sadat on
several occasions. "One time,
we went to look at a series of
tombs that were on a big hill,
and he jokingly told me, 'I
have to give you a cane along
with the rest of these old men,
so you can make it to the top
of this hill."' Mazer still has
the cane.
One of the most interesting
aspects of his time in Cairo
"was of course an unfortunate
one for the Egyptians — the
assassination of Anwar Sadat
in October 1981.
"After the assassination,
the U.S. Embassy was an-
ticipating some problems, but
there were none," Mazer said.
"The transition from Sadat to
then-Vice President Hosni
Mubarak was relatively
smooth."
In June 1982, Mazer was
assigned to Riyadh, Saudi
Arabia.
"It afforded my family a dif-
ferent kind of challenge, par-
ticularly for my wife," Mazer
said. "It's a country where
women are treated as second-
class citizens. My wife was
not permitted to drive, and if
there wasn't a motorpool
vehicle available from the em-
bassy, she was pretty much
stuck at home because it was
also taboo for women to be
walking down the streets."
Mazer's responsibility was
providing security for the
1984 move of the U.S. Em-
bassy from Jidda to Riyadh.
Mazer also protected U.S. Am-
bassador Richard Murphy,
who had been threatened
with death by a terrorist
group.
"One of the highlights in
Saudi Arabia was when I

escorted Murphy and the
King of Saudi Arabia to the
Riyadh camel races, the
Saudi equivalent to the In-
dianapolis 500," Mazer said.
"The winner won a 75-foot
water truck."
In May 1983, Mazer tem-
porarily left his family in
Saudi Arabia.
"When the U.S. Embassy in
Beirut was bombed in April,
I was called to assist the
security officer there and re-
establish a security program
in a new building," Mazer
said. "To a layman, the
easiest way to describe the

`We've certainly
learned to stop
complaining about
things we take for
- granted in the
United States.

city of Beirut at that time was
that it looked like a back lot
at Universal Studios; it was
total devastation."
A few months later, Mazer
returned to his family and job
in Saudi Arabia. They soon
were assigned to Indonesia,
where they spent three years.
He was regional security of-
ficer at the U.S. Embassy
there in Jacarta when
Japanese Red Army terrorists
fired two rockets at the
building. There were no
injuries.
In 1987, Mazer and his
family returned to the United
States so that he could
manage the State Depart-
ment's 100 million dollar
security program.
"This was my first desk job,
and quite frankly I didn't en-
joy it," Mazer said.
Last November, Mazer was
asked by the newly appointed
special agent in charge of
Secretary of State Baker's
detail to become one of his
deputies.
"Because of the rigors of the
job, the constant travel and
long hours, I don't plan on do-
ing this for more than two or
three years," Mazer said. "I
can put in 80-hour weeks on
trips overseas and go a stretch
of 30 days in a row without a
day off."
"Secretary of State Baker is
one of the most down-to-earth
people with whom I've had
the pleasure of working,"
Mazer said. "When you spend
so much time with one per-
son, there can be friction, but
I don't feel any with Secretary
of State Baker. I get along
very well with him and his
family."
Over his 13 years at the
State Department, Mazer has
met Presidents Carter,

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