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May 26, 1989 - Image 59

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

(GOING PLACES I

WEEK OF
MAY 26-JUNE 1

SPECIAL EVENTS

WORLD FIGURE
SKATING
CHAMPIONS
Joe Louis Arena, Detroit,
Campbell's Soups 1989
Tour of Olympic and
World Figure Skating
Champions, June 1, 8
p.m., admission,
567-6000.

COMEDY

COMEDY CASTLE

2593 Woodward, Berkley,

Thom Sharp, today and
Saturday; Eddie Merrill,
Tuesday through June 3,
admission, 542-9900.

THEATER

Dan Frischman tried his hand at
stand-up comedy prior to
pursuing acting as a career.

HEAD OF
THE C

Dan Frischman's TV role has
earned him a lot of fan mail.

ILENE LEHRMAN

Special to The Jewish News

he first acknowl-
edgement Dan
Frischman gives
to his current
success is an
honest declaration of the hard
work and determination he's
put into his career. He started
entertaining audiences as a
youngster performing magic
tricks, ventriloquism and
comedy.
"Right from the start, there
was always encouragement,"

he admits. "I had the oppor-
tunity early on to nurture a
child's talent." His parents,
Joseph, a CPA, and Florence,
a second grade school teacher,
still live in Whippany, N.J.
"My dad," boasts Frischman,
"is my biggest fan."
Sitting in his comfortable
private trailer on the Warner
Bros. lot, Frischman sips a
soy milkshake (he's recently
given up dairy products), and
talks about his unusual
background. After high
school, where he admits he
was an average student,

Frischman attended Penn
State University for two
years; then tried his luck in
New York City. He appeared
as a stand-up comedian in
such gateway-paving
showcase clubs as The Comic
Strip, Catch a Rising Star,
and Dangerfield's. His
refreshing material was well
received and he decided to try
his luck in California.
"My move to Los Angeles
proved a lucky one," he
smiles. That's an understate-
ment because after a fashion,
his career took off and shows
no sign of slowing down.
If you saw Frischman sing-
ing the lead role of Seymour
in "Head of the Class's" ver-
sion of Little Shop of Horrors,
you could correctly assume
that he'll now be adding a few
songs to his stand-up comedy
act.
He and his writing partner
have also written an After-
school Special for ABC, about
a retarded boy (who will be
played by Frischman), in a
role completely opposite of
the brainy nerd, Arvid, he
portrays on "Head of the
Class" each week.
In real life, Frischman is
anything but a nerd. He is ex-
tremely affable, charming,
sensitive and very funny. As

with other young stars, talent
is a given. It is Frischman's
skill and professionalism that
will provide his longevity.
His distinctive persona
caught the eye of a casting
agent, and he was given his
first television role on ABC's
"It's a Living." His portrayal
of the not-too-bright
dishwasher, Frankie, brought
him to the attention of top
producers and directors who
cast him in such popular
shows as "Newhart," "Facts of
Life," and "St. Elsewhere."
Then began the fan mail. He
reads the letters personally.
"They're mostly from
teenagers asking advice, from
Arvid, about their love lives."
Does he ever acknowledge
them? "Yes, I do," he answers
proudly.
Has success changed Dan
Frischman? "People's reac-
tions to me are moving from
`that kid on Head of the
Class' to knowing my name,
and that's nice. Also, my self-
confidence is growing," he
points out. The only other
change, he confesses, is that
he's into healthful food.
Even though Frischman's
schedule is very taxing, he
finds time to exercise his
social conscience. For the past
four years, he's emceed the

DETROIT
REPERTORY
THEATER
13103 Woodrow Wilson
Ave., Detroit, Enchanted
Night, Charlie and Out
At Sea, now through
June 25, admission,
868-1347.
ROEPER SCHOOL
Roeper Middle/Upper
School Campus, Adams
Rd., Bloomfield Hills,
Little Shop of Horrors,
today, Saturday and
Sunday, admission,
642-1500.
THE PERFORMANCE
NETWORK
458 N. Crooks, Clawson,
West End Productions,
Extremities, 8 p.m. today,
Saturday and 2 p.m.
Sunday; 408 W.
Washington, Ann Arbor,
Riffs, a theater and blues
cabaret; dance party
following featuring
Jeanne and the Dreams,
Wednesday, and Fully
Loaded, Thursday,
admission, 435-7859.
SHAW FESTIVAL
Niagara-on-the-Lake,
Ontario, Man and
Superman, now through
Oct. 15; Berkeley Square,
now through Oct. 14;
and Once in a Lifetime,
now through July 23,
admission, (416)
468-2172.
BIRMINGHAM
THEATRE
211 S. Woodward,
Birmingham, The Nerd,
now through June 18,

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

57

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