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February 17, 1989 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

Instrumental

Continued from preceding page

,NN

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62

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1989

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Renaissance City Chamber
Players (now known as the
New American Chamber Or-
chestra), got in touch with
friends and friends of friends,
spreading the word that he
was looking for good musi-
cians to play full-time in the
Renaissance City group. As it
happened, one of his friends
was a friend of Goldschmid's
teacher, who highly recom-
mended her and urged her to
come to Detroit to audition
for the Renaissance City
Players.
"So, I came here and, dur-
ing the auditions,_ met my
three colleagues," she says.
"They'd come from Indiana
University. That first year
with the players, we wanted
to form a string quartet, but
we were working too hard
with the Players to do it.
There just was no time or
energy left."
As the weeks and months
went by, the four young wo-
men never wavered in their
determination to see their
dream realized.
As it happened, the big
decision to "go for it" came
one morning over coffee at a
local restaurant.
"I'll never forget that morn-
ing," Goldschmid says. "From
that time on, we all swore
we'd be a string quartet. We
said we'd rehearse at 8 o'clock
in the morning, 10 o'clock at
night, or whenever we could
find the time. And that's
what we started doing. We
worked day and night,
whenever we could.
"Finally, the situation came
for me that I couldn't play in
the Renaissance group any-
more, and I resigned." Even,
tually, the three other women
resigned from the Renais-
sance City Players, so that
each could devote her time to
the quartet. All of them even-
tually landed teaching posi-
tions at Oakland University
and at the Institute of Music
and Dance. In the meantime,
Detroit-area artist represen-
tative Sally Sanfield heard
the group play, and offered to
take them on as clients.
"She was wonderful," says
Goldschmid. "After hearing
us play just once, she wanted
to know what she could do to
help us. Through her, we got
a lot of concerts set up, and
became known in the Detroit
area."
The quartet has also recent-
ly been added to the roster of
international concert mana-
ger, Mariedi Anders, of San
Francisco, and will soon per-
form in concerts on the West
Coast.
After a short time together,
the quartet began to par-
ticipate in competition, both
here and abroad. Through a

Ann Goldschmid and her string quartet have won many awards and
toured extensively.

win at the Cleveland Quartet
Competition, they've gained a
fellowship at the Eastman
School of Music in Rochester,
N.Y., where they often per-
form, and are coached by
members of the acclaimed
Cleveland Quartet.
Recently, in addition to the
Fischoff award, they placed
third in the Portsmouth
(England) International
String Quartet Competition.
For the competition, Gold-
schmid had the opportunity
to play on a Stradivarius, bor-
rowed from a friend.
"A violin like that makes a
huge difference to a per-
former," she says, adding that
string quartet musicians
nowadays rarely have the op-
portunity to play the half-
million dollar instruments,
unless they are received as a
loan or as a gift from a
benefactor.
Though the upbeat Gold-
schmid emphasizes that
"string quartet players never
get rich" (the group took
home less than $15,000
apiece last year), she is quick
to point out that the
Lafayette will eventually be a
definite financial success.
"If we didn't know that we
each had the capability and
what it takes to make it in
the future (as a quartet), we'd

all be in orchestras right now,
or doing something else."
For Goldschmid, a typical
work day lasts about 12
hours, beginning with a quick
breakfast with her attorney
husband, Robert, in their Oak
Park home.
"We love that time because,
usually, that's about the- only
time we have together," she
says, laughing. (Laughing
and smiling is something
Goldschmid does a lot of.
When asked to describe her,
the other members of the
Quartet use words like "en-
thusiastic" and "happy.")
After her husband leaves
for work, Goldschmid heads
for her at-home studio and
begins practice for the day.
"My first priority in the
morning is practicing, so that
I don't come in and make a
fool of myself in quartet
rehearsal. If I come into
rehearsal, and I'm not
prepared, I feel awful. I think
that's one of the great things
about the quartet — each one
of us has such personal in-
tegrity that we just are not
going to let the other person
down."
Along with other members
of the quartet, Goldschmid
says she spends around an
hour-and-a-half each day
making business calls.

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