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December 30, 1988 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



FEELING GOOD

NOW YOU CAN
HAVE A NEW FACE
AND A NEW BODY

Sinai Hospital/JCC Sponsor
New Cardiac Program

through effective,
professional cosmetic
surgery

Sagging eyelids, wrinkles in the neck
and forehead, a weak chin, protruding
ears, facial scars, too-small or too-
large breasts, unwanted fat in the
chin, neck, stomach, waist, hips,
buttocks or thighs—these conditions
are all potential reasons for cosmetic
surgery by the caring doctors
of COSMETIC SURGEONS OF
MICHIGAN — one of the area's lead-
ing cosmetic surgery practices.

From head to toe, you can benefit
from modern, safe, effective tech-
niques practiced by COSMETIC
SURGEONS OF MICHIGAN, includ-
ing breast reconstruction, breast and
body recontouring, liposuction and
facial and nose cosmetic surgery
procedures.

Let these new techniques welcome
a new you! Call COSMETIC
SURGEONS OF MICHIGAN today for
more information. Free literature and
initial consultation are available
for selected procedures. Call
(313)_ 645-0844.

COSMETIC SURGEONS OF MICHIGAN, P.C.

G. JAN BEEKHUIS, M.D., F.A.C.S.
JEFFREY J. COLTON, M.D., F.A.C.S.
MICHAEL F. MILAN, M.D., F.A.C.S.

••••

NIMI116,11,/

All Board Certified Surgeons

/

30700 Telegraph Rd., Suite 4566, Birmingham, MI 48010 • 313/645-0844

One Mile South of Temple Beth El

I FEEL GOOD TODAY WITHOUT
SWEAT, STRAIN OR TIRED MUSCLES

o

O NO CONTRACTS
• ).T1 NO MEMBERSHIP FEES
O JUST RESULTS!

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE
EUROPEAN BODY WRAPS
MANICURIST
AVAILABLE

14

figure Salon

WE ALSO FEATURE AN ALL NATURAL LINE OF
VITAMINS, COSMETICS, BODY PRODUCTS AND HERBS

CALL TODAY: 3 3 2 - 5 4 5 0

O

0

I 1948 S. TELEGRAPH ROAD • BLOOMFIELD DESIGN PLAZA I

4 F

-

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1988

Sinai Hospital and the
Jewish Community Center
(JCC) will sponsor a medical-
ly supervised cardiac fitness
program for healthy people
called the Wellness Program.
The program's goal is to
reduce the level of cardiac
risk in the community and
will begin Feb. 1 at the main
branch of the JCC in West
Bloomfield.
"We're excited about this
program because it is the on-
ly one in the area where peo-
ple who are basically healthy
will be supervised while they
exercise," says Melvyn Ruben-
fire, M.D., chairman of the
department of medicine at
Sinai.
The Wellness Program's $99
initiation fee includes a car-
diac fitness profile. The profile
includes numerous car-
diovascular fitness tests: a
submaximal stress test, a
body fat evaluation, a
cholesterol test and a
strength test. (The cardiac
profile can be purchased
separately.)
The participant receives an
individualized exercise
prescription, a record book to
keep test results, educational
materials, and the opportuni-
ty to participate in the pro-
gram's activities supervised
by the staff from Sinai's
Center for Cardiovascular
Health.
The Wellness Program's $36
monthly membership fee (less
for JCC members) entitles
participants to use the pool
and track at the JCC as well
as equipment reserved ex-
clusively for the program.
Some of the new equipment
includes Air-Dyne bikes, row-
ing machines and a
stairmaster.
Many of the Wellness Pro-
gram's activities are similar
to those available at area
health clubs. Some of the
supervised activities include
aerobics and other forms of
exercise. "Eventually we'll
have supervised tennis and
other individual sports,
supervised canoe trips and
other outings," says
Rubenfire.
Lectures and educational
services will be offered in-
cluding diet and nutrition
counseling smoking cessation
classes and heart-healthy
cooking demonstrations.
Rubenfire explains that
heart disease is the number
one killer in the United
States but that most people
can reduce their risk of
developing heart disease by
exercising, following a better
diet and stopping smoking.

According to Tim Kostelnik,
director of the cardiovascular
fitness program, the program
will be offered from 8 a.m.-
9 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday and evenings from
4 p.m.-6 p.m. on Monday,
Thursday and Friday. "If we
have more requests for dif-
ferent hours, we will accom-
modate it," says Kostelnik.
Sinai Hospital and the JCC
have collaborated before to
reduce heart disease in their
cardiovascular rehabilitation
program which includes peo-
ple recovering from heart
surgery or a heart attack. The
program, based • on a 1975
Sinai study which showed
that exercise improves car-
diovascular fitness, is still in
existence.
"I find it very fulfilling that
the seeds for cardiac wellness
that we planted in 1975, with
the study we did at the JCC,
are coming to fruition now
with the opening of the
Wellness Program," says
Rubenfire. "And I'm really
proud that Sinai and the JCC
are working together to pro-
mote the health of the com-
munity." ❑

For membership information
about the Wellness Program or
for information about the cardiac
fitness profile, call the physical
education department at the JCC
at 661-1000.

Healthy Kids?

Are today's American
children in adequate physical
shape? Most parents would
answer yes, but according to
Dr. Charles Kuntzleman, Na-
tional Director of the Feelin'
Good Program, a children's
cardiovascular-fitness pro-
gram and author of Healthy
Kids for Life (Simon and
Schuster, $16.95) "chances
are they'd be wrong?' Con-
sider the alarming statistics:
• Between 1984 and 1988 a
series of studies on millions of
American children ages 5 to
17 have shown that 64 per-
cent fail to meet minimum
fitness criteria.
• Only 36 percent of
American school children
have physical education every
day, with the average gym
class devoting as little as one
minute to vigorous aerobic
exercise.
• More than 20 percent of
the average American child's
food calories come from sugar.
• Roughly 42 percent of to-
day's kids have cholesterol
levels that are too high.
• 67 percent have three or
more risk factors for heart
disease..

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