100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 18, 1988 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOCUS

Gorbachev And Bush

Continued from preceding page

INCREDIBLE
SAVINGS!

5 0- 70

OFF

EVERYTHING IN OUR
CLEARANCE CENTER

FRIDAY-SATURDAY
SUNDAY

Barbara and George Bush celebrate his election victory. The Soviets are
waiting to make a Middle East deal.

DAYS
ONLY!

FARMINGTON HILLS
INDUSTRIAL CENTER

a

0

a

H

0

N

H ALSTEAD ROA D

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NOMINAL CHARGE

SHERWOOD
CLEARANCE
CENTER

C RESTVIEW CT.

NOVEMBER
18-19-20
FRI 5-9 PM
SAT 10-5
SUN 12-4

0
0

c3

0

SHERWOOD
STUDIOS

CLEARANCE CENTER

TEN MILE ROAD

24734 CRESTVIEW CT.
FARMINGTON HILLS

PHONE: 354-9060 PRIOR TO SALE
476-3760 DAYS OF SALE

Tables • Desks
Wall Units
Bedrooms
Dining Rooms

For
Appt.
Call

52

10 Years Experience & Expertise in the Design
of Affordable Laminate, Lucite & Wood
Furniture

Muriel Wetsman

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1988

661-3838 ,

ment, by which they sought
to demonstrate that Israel
does indeed have credible
Arab negotiating partners
and that the Peres strategy
was, after all, alive.
The second, an act of both
symbolic and practical impor-
tance, was their approval of
the appointment of Arie
Levin, one of Israel's most
senior career diplomats, to
head the Israeli consular
delegation in Moscow.
So far, the dialogue between
Soviet and Israeli officials has
been limited to consular and
technical matters, but Levin's
presence in Moscow will un-
doubtedly raise the profile of
the Israeli mission and, in the
absence of formal diplomatic
relations, will provide a con-,
duit for a direct political
dialogue between the two
states.
According to Dr. Galia
Golan, a senior Soviet speci-
alist at the Hebrew Universi-
ty of Jerusalem, Moscow's
conduct is an indication that
the glow of glasnost will con-
tinue to inform its relations
with Israel, irrespective of the
state of political affairs in
Israel or the nature of the
government in power.

It is significant, she told
me, that the Soviets finally
acquiesced in Israel's demand
to send a reciprocal consular
delegation to Moscow in Feb-
ruary — at the height of the
intifada and at a moment
when Israel was firmly
locked in the international
dog-house.

"I reached the conclusion
then," she says, "that the
Soviets had determined their
policy and that they were go-
ing to follow it through, step
by step, no matter what else
was going on.
"They certainly want an

international conference, but
their policy is also intended
to improve relations with the
Western world and what they
call 'capitalist countries of
the developing world? "
Ultimately, however, the
Soviets hope that the flurry of
superpower diplomatic activi-
ty in the region will crack the
deadlock open wide enough
to allow for new beginnings,
whatever government holds
power in Israel.
Indeed, a joint American-
Soviet approach now seems
more likely than ever follow-
ing an important break-
through in the United States
late last month.
The United States has al-
ways strenuously resisted at-
tempts to involve the United
Nations Security Council in
the Arab- Israeli conflict, but
at a meeting of foreign min-
isters of the five permanent
members last month, Wash-
ington abandoned its long-
standing policy.
The United States, it is
understood, has now decided
to develop a coordinated ap-
proach to the conflict, pos-
sibly involving China,
France, Britain and, of
course, the Soviet Union.
After the meeting, Soviet
Deputy Foreign Minister
Vladimir Petrovsky, revealed
that a consensus was develop-
ing on a multilateral ap-
proach to the region: "If you
look at the map of crisis sit-
uations," he said in an inter-
view, "it is being filled with
solutions. The Middle East is
the exception."
According to reports in Lon-
don, the five ministers agreed
to keep the new U.S. position
secret because, according to
one diplomat, any suggestion
of Soviet involvement in Mid-
dle East talks would have
been "like a stick of dynamite
in the Bush campaign."

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan