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November 04, 1988 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

h"--

Budget Shortfall Is Choking
Soviet Jewry Influx To U.S.

Eating Disorders

JAMES D. BESSER

Now, there's help for
this secret sickness.

ewish representatives
here scheduled an
emergency meeting on
Wednesday to discuss storm
clouds on the Soviet Jewry
horizon.
The problem involves the
growing number of refugees
seeking entry to the United
States — and a refugee
budget that has not kept pace,
according to the American
Jewish Committee's David
Harris, whose concerns
sparked the crisis meeting.
The growing numbers are
coming from a variety of
areas — including the Soviet
Union, where Jews are leav-
ing at an accelerating rate
thanks to liberalization by
the Gorbachev regime.
At the same time, Congress
and the administration, fac-
ing rising budget deficits,
have not appropriated enough
money to handle refugees at
the currently predicted rates.
The embarrassing gap be-
tween rhetoric and reality
first became apparent early
this summer, when the State
Department sheepishly re-
vealed that money had run
out to process Soviet Jews and
Armenians seeking to escape
the Soviet Union.
Despite the "dire needs" ap-
propriation and the coming of
the new fiscal year, the
budgets have still not been
adjusted upwards.
"Currently, 2000 Soviet
Jews are leaving every
month," Harris said, "At that
rate, we will run out of both
allotments and money by
April 1?'
The government, Harris
said, is already looking for
greater financial participa-
tion by private resettlement
agencies — and by the refu-
gees themselves and their
families. This growing 'priva-
tization," activists worry, will
discriminate against groups
and individuals who lack
financial resources, and it
will place an enormous strain
on already-overburdened
resettlement agencies in this
country.

hide food.
sneak away to eat.
binge, then vomit.
And you don't even know why.
Stop blaming yourself, and get help.
At Associates of Birmingham.
We offer individual and group therapy for
women and adolescent girls.
Our programs focus on coping with the
emotional stress, and breaking the pattern.

YOU

Remember, there's more to you than numbers
on a scale.
Call Beth Goodman, M.S.W.

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32 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1988

Washington Correspondent

j

Findley Praise
Givet Democrats
Ammunition

The Democrats, who have
been blasted for the growing
power of pro Arab elements
within the party, got in a few
licks of their own last week.
The issue involved a mail-

ing from the Arab-American
Republican Federation. In-
cluded was a letter signed by
Paul Findley, the former Illi-
nois congressman.
Findley gave Bush the kind
of praise the presidential con-
tender could probably do
without. Referring to Bush,
Findley said "It is noteworthy
that when I was under heavy
attack by Israel's lobby in my
ill-fated 1982 campaign, he
resisted lobby pressure and
spoke in my behalf at a home
district fund-raiser."

Michael Dukakis:
Israel's errand boy?

Findley referred to Michael
Dukakis as "Israel's errand
boy," and claimed that
Dukakis receives money from
pro-Israel PACs; in fact,
Dukakis has rejected money
from PACs of all types.
The Democrats were _de-
lighted. "I couldn't concoct a
more fitting statement on
why Jews should vote for
Dukakis," said Hyman Book-
binder, special adviser to the
Dukakis campaign. "There
hasn't been anybody in Con-
gress with as long and consis-
tent record of Israel bashing
as Charles Findley!'

Jewish Groups
Join Critics Of
Pro-Lifers

When "Operation Rescue"
attempted to close down abor-
tion and family planning
clinics through the nation
last Saturday, a number of
Jewish groups were on the fir-
ing line with a different point
of view.
The Religious Coalition for
AbortiOn Rights, which in-
cludes most of the mainline
Jewish groups, held a press
conference earlier in the week
to express its strong disap-
proval of the goals and tactics
of the anti-abortion forces.

"What we are seeing is that
anti-choice forces used their
demonstrations in Atlanta
during the Democratic Con-
vention as a way of getting
new attention," said Sammie
Moshenberg, Washington rep-
resentative of the National
Council of Jewish Women,
one of the groups participat-
ing in the news conference.
"The anti-abortion movement
has always had an extremist
stream in it — but the size of
this event, and the focus is
alarming to us."
Tracy Salkowitz, vice presi-
dent of the Religious Coali-
tion and regional director for
the American Jewish Con-
gress, saw the effort to oppose
Operation Rescue as a matter
of basic civil rights.
"Operation Rescue is an
outrage," she said. "Our
freedom of speech flourishes
on differing values and ideas.
It is outrageous that people
should try to harass indivi-
duals on their own personal
choices — choices that are
often very difficult, very per-
sonal ones."
But attempts to mobilize a
network of pro-choice volun-
teers to escort women seeking
services at these clinics
through crowds of protesters
were hampered by Operation
Rescue's tactics; protest
organizers refused to reveal
the exact targets in each city
until the day of the planned
demonstration.
Also participating in "Oper-
ation Respect" were the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, the American
Jewish Committee and B'nai
B'rith Women.

Church-State
Question Gets
More Complex

As issues go, separation of
religion and state has
generally been one of few
points of consensus for Jewish
activists.
But the once-simple ques-
tion is developing new
wrinkles, according to Jim
Castelli, church-state director
for People for the American
Way and author of a new book
on the subject, A Plea for
Common Sense.
Among those shifts, accord-
ing to Castelli, is a subtle
change within the Jewish
organizations that have
played a leading role in
church-state battles.
"I have a sense that what
might be happening is that
some people with an cab-

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