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November 04, 1988 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Join us in electing Joan Young
Oakland County Probate Judge.

He said the best plan would
be a Labor-Likud government
with a lifespan of six to 12
months. During that time,
the two parties would alter
Israel's electoral system to
prevent another stalemate.
The parties would then call
for new elections.

Orthodox Parties
Hold Balance

u

niversity of Michigan
political scientist Dr.
Raymond Tanter said
it is ironic that even though
the election was fought on
questions of peace and securi-
ty, those issues will not be ad-
dressed, irrespective of
whether Likud or Labor
forms the next government.
Both major parties are con-
cerned with the peace process
— Likud with its land-for-
security philosophy and
Labor with its land-for-peace
policy — "but it is the
religious parties that will
have the final say," Tanter
said.
The strong showing of the
religious camp and the gains
made by Agudat Yisrael and
its offshoots Shas and Degel
Hatorah — all three are ultra-
Orthodox and non-Zionist in
philosophy — raise questions
as to what concessions Likud
or Labor will have to make to
secure their support.
Shoshana Cardin, former
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations, express-
ed concern that the religious
parties will try to make
passage of "Who Is A Jew"
legislation amending the Law
of Return the condition for
participating in a coalition.
The Law of Return offers
any Jew automatic Israeli
citizenship. A Jew is now
defined as anyone born of a
Jewish mother or converted
to Judaism. "Who Is A Jew"
legislation would require
halachic, or Orthodox, conver-
sion. Critics of the Orthodox
initiative, like Cardin, say the
passage of this legislation
would split the Jewish people
and drive a wedge between
Israel and the Diaspora.
"We will be vocal in ex-
pressing our hope that a coali-
tion will not be formed with
a commitment to amending
that law," Cardin said.
U-M's Tanter said the
strong religious showing is
not a reflection of increased
religiosity in Israel, but "an
expression of satisfaction
with the National Unity
Government. Some swing
voters just moved into the
religious camp."
Because neither party was
given a clear mandate for its
policies, Tanter predicts a con-

Nina Dodge Abrams
Alan T. Ackerman
Denise R. Alexander
James Alexander
Donna L. Bookholder
Ronald M. Bookholder
Bert Burgoyne
Sue Ann Canvasser
Lawrence S. Cohen
Arthur J. Cole
Hon. Martin M. Doctoroff
Carol Dorfman
Joel Dorfman
Harry S. Ellman
Jerome S. Fanger
Abba I. Friedman
Sharon S. Friedman
Hon. Hilda R. Gage
Frank Gettleson
Hon. Alice L. Gilbert
Edward D. Gold

Jerome B. Greenbaum
Judith Greenbaum
Henry Gornbein
Leslie Neil Greenwald
Hanley Gurwin
Diane Harnisch
Harvey Heller
Judith A. Holtz
Hon. David M. Honigman
J. Leonard Hyman
Michael M. Jacob
Robert Karbel
Alan Jay Kaufman
Barry Keller
Martin P. Krohner
Leslie Kutinsky
Stephen Landau
Jeffrey Leib
Morris Levin
Hon. Norman L. Lippitt

Betty Lowenthal
Frank Mamat
Alan A. May
Edward B. Meth
Sheldon Miller
Fred Morganroth
Janice Morganroth
Allan Nachman
Sanford Rosenthal
Harriet Rotter
Dr. Norman Rotter
Shirley Saltzman
Joel Serlin
Anne Gonte Silver
Alan Singer
Anthony Spookojny
Robert Stein
Allan H. Tushman
Richard Victor
C. Robert Wartell

Authorized and paid for by Joan Young for Probate Judge Committee, 5435 Corporate Drive, Suite 275, Troy, Michigan 48098, Fenei Greenwald, Treasurer.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

17

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