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November 04, 1988 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

THE UNDERSIGNED MEMBERS OF THE LEGAL
COMMUNITY STRONGLY URGE YOU TO VOTE FOR:

Israel's Election

CIRCUIT JUDGE
RICHARD D.

KUHN

For

COURT OF APPEALS

PROMOTE INTEGRITY AND EXPERIENCE






Oakland County Circuit Judge, over 151/2 years
Chief Judge, 3 years
Visiting Judge, Court of Appeals
Experienced Trial Lawyer, 13 years

Circuit Judge Richard D. Kuhn will bring legal learning and
ability to the Court of Appeals. His integrity, ethics, dedica-
tion to hard work and judicial temperament are unsurpassed.

ENDORSED BY:
—Detroit Free Press
—Detroit News
— Police Officers Association
of Michigan
—And Numerous Others

Alan T. Ackerman
Sheldon Adler
James Alexander
Donald Barris
Henry Baskin
Stephen Bernstein
Samuel Bienenstock
Sol Bluestone
Irving Blum
Robert Feldstein
Herschel Fink
Hon. Hilda Gage
Sandor Gelman
Hon. Alice Gilbert
Allen Glass
Gordon Gold
David Goldman
David A. Goldman
Daniel Goldsmith
Robert Goren
Henry Gornbein
Alan Greenberg
Cathy Grenberg

"Judge Kuhn has been a steady
influence in fighting crime.
I highly recommend voting
for him."
John F. Nichols,
Oakland County Sheriff

Leslie N. Greenwald
Lawrence Gurstein
Hanley Gurwin
Harvey R. Heller
Hon. David Honigman
J. Leonard Hyman
Norman Hyman
Michael Jacob
Larry Kaluzny
Alan Kanter
Alan J. Kaufman
Hon. Nathan Kaufman
Joseph Kosik
Michael Kramer
Gary Krochmal
Michael Leib
Hon. Bryan Levy
Stephen Linden
Hon. Norman L. Lippitt
Betty Lowenthal
Richard Madden
Daniel Moss

Paul Nida
Elliott Perlman
Jeffrey Perlman
Bernard Portnoy
Norman Robbins
Michael Robbins
Harriet Rotter
Barry Rosenbaum
Arthur Rubiner
Joel Serlin
Jeffrey Sherman
Arnold Shifman
Ronald Siegel
Lisa Sommers
Norman Sommers
Hon. Edward Sosnick
Robert Stein
Fred Steinhardt
Martin Stoneman
Richard Victor
C. Robert Wartell
Kenneth Zorn

Paid for by the above individuals and authorized by the Circuit Judge Kuhn for Court of Appeals.
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16

FRIDAY, NOVEMB E R 4, 1988 .

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Continued from Page 1

terror incidents in which
three Israelis were killed and
at least eight others were
wounded did not seriously af-
fect the balloting. Nor did last
week's summit of the leaders
of Egypt, Jordan and the
Palestine Liberation
Organization, which gave
tacit support for Labor.
Nevertheless, said Olmert,
"people were furious that out-
siders were trying to tell
them how to vote?'
Turnout at the polls was 80
percent, the highest par-
ticipation since Israel's first
election. Seventy-four percent
of Israel's Arab community
cast their ballots. Gideon
Doron, an Israeli pollster, said
"the expectation that the
Arab vote would help Labor
was not fulfilled?'
In fact, neither Labor nor
Likud did as well as expected,
Doron said.
Still, Likud is widely ex-
pected to be President Chaim
Herzog's first choice for form-
ing a government. While not
ruling out a possible deal
with Labor, religious party
leaders Tuesday expressed a
greater affinity for the Likud
because of its refusal to relin-
quish territory in exchange
for a settlement with the
Arabs.
Labor is not expected to be
able to block the Likud from

forming a coalition, Doron
said. Its allies only form 48
seats. Even with support from
the Communist Chadash Par-
ty and the Progressive List for
Peace — generally considered
outside the pale of coalition
politics — Labor can only
muster 56 votes, too few to
prevent a Likud majority.

Another Unity
Government?

A

t the teleconference,
two Israeli politicians
analyzed the election

results.
"The results show that
most people in Israel are not
willing to give anything. That
doesn't mean, though, that
they don't believe in peace,"
said Likud Knesset Member
Meir Shitrit.
While acknowledging that
Labor's chances of forming a
coalition are poor, Labor
Knesset Member Chaim
Rimon did not rule out
negotiations with the
religious parties.
Rimon also mentioned the
possibility of another Labor-
Likud government. He said
Labor would not sit in a coali-
tion with right-wing parties
such as Thchiyah, 'hornet and
Moledet. The latter calls for
expelling Palestinians from
the territories.

The Second Election:
Building A Coalition

srael's parties fall into
three general camps:
the Likud and parties of
the right; Labor and parties
of the left; and the religious
parties.
All parties of the right are
natural partners for the
Likud because they believe
in retaining the admini-
stered territories.
Two leftist parties,
Chadash and the Pro-
gressive List for Peace, are
considered outside the pale
of coalition politics, but
might be counted on by
Labor to block Likud
maneuvers.
The religious parties are
considered more natural
partners for the Likud than
Labor because most are in-
terested in retaining the ter-
ritories and because Labor
is viewed as anti-religious.
By custom, Israel's Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog will
turn to the party leader he
considers most able to form
a government. That leader
will have about three weeks
to do so.
Since neither Likud nor

I

Labor has enough seats in
the Knesset to form a ma-
jority, a coalition will have
to be formed with other like-
minded parties.
Following is a list of par-
ties elected to the 12th
Knesset and the number of
seats they received.

The Likud Camp

Likud
Thchiyah
Tsomet
Moledet

39
3
2
2

Total:

46

The Labor Camp

Labor
Citizens Rights
Mapam
Center-Shinui
Arab Democratic
Chadash
Progressive List

38
5
3
2
1
5
2

Total:

56

The Religious Camp

Shas
National Religious
Agudat Yisrael
Degel Hatorah

Total:

6
5
5
2

18
— David Holzel

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