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September 30, 1988 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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20

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1988

Sinai

Continued from Page 1

F IEFT
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NEWS I

Yet Pearsall said he could
"understand why the clinic is
very expensive to run!' He
said patients received team
treatment by both male and
female counselors and that
they had longer sessions than
those required by most
therapists.
Pearsall also claimed he
had no knowledge of the
financial workings of the
clinic — from its overall
operating budget to the
salaries of its employees.
"I never even knew the
salaries given to the staff I
would hire," Pearsall said, ad-
ding that the relationship
between the clinic and Sinai
could not be characterized as
having "an open line of com-
munication."
Shapiro said that Pearsall
was informed of the clinic's
finances and included in the
budgetary process.
Pearsall was involved in
review during the annual
financial planning sessions,
Sinai officials said.
The Problems of Daily Liv-
ing Clinic originally was
located at Sinai.
In the mid-1980s, half of the
clinic's services were moved to

West Bloomfield, and half re-
mained at Sinai. Later, the
entire clinic was moved to
Sinai's Goldin Center at
Maple and Farmington roads
in West Bloomfield.
Despite his impending

"It was very simply
a matter of being
more productive,
controlling costs
and examining
every program as
part of our plan of
restructuring."

departure from the clinic,
Pearsall said he's not bitter,
just "deeply hurt" that the
facility in West Bloomfield
will close.
"I find it so sad that such a
strong program is ending," he
said.
Shapiro agreed that "we
think this program has
merit" and will be continued
at the main Sinai complex.
Shapiro added that he is
"personally saddened that Dr.
Pearsall decided to leave!"

Mrs. Stollman

Continued from Page 1

fluenced Federation's role in
broadening its own program-
ming to that constituency. As
a longtime vice president of
the Federation, her counsel
was always available, freely
given and frequntly follow-
ed."
In appreciation for her
longtime service to the
Detroit Jewish community,
Federation gave her its Fred
M. Butzel Award in 1980.
Mrs. Stollman had leading
roles in women's divisions of
leading Jewish causes. She
founded the Detroit Chapter
of American Women for Bar-
Ilan. She was a past president
of the Women's Division of
Jewish Welfare Federation,
was a former chairman of the
Women's Division of State of
Israel Bonds in Detroit and a
past president of Women of
Jewish National Fund. For
their leadership in activities
benefiting JNF, a forest in
Israel was named in honor of
Mrs. Stollman and her
husband.
Dulcie Rosenfeld, who holds
a seat on the Federation
board of governors, called
Mrs. Stollman a role model
for women. "She was a men-
tor and role model for every
woman in the Women's Divi-
sion and her approach to the
fund-raising and education
components of the Women's

Frieda Stollman

Division and her total com-
mitment to the overall Jewish
community and Federation
were unique . . . she was very
gentle and very strong."
An active supporter of the
Young Israel movement in
Detroit, Mrs. Stollman held
membership with her family
in Young Israel of Oak-Woods.
She joined her family in af-
filiation with the Mizrachi
Orthodox Zionist movement.
Mrs. Stollman is survived
by her husband, Max; two
sons, Bernard of Birmingham
and Mellvyn of Tel Aviv; a
daugher, Mrs. Robert (Sandra)
Greenstone of Houston,
Texas; a brother, Aaron
Ginsberg; and seven
grandchildren.

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