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September 09, 1988 - Image 167

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YEAR N REVIEW 5748 YEAR IN REVIEW

THE DEMOCRATS chose Gov. Michael Dukakis, shown here with

his family at the national convention in Atlanta, as their presidential
nominee. The candidate's wife, Kitty (third from left) is Jewish, and
she stirred controversy when she said that the couple's three
children were raised as half-Jewish and half-Greek.

SEN. CARL LEVIN (D-Mich.) helped organize a letter, signed by 30

U.S. Senators, supporting the Shultz initiative and urging Prime
Minister Shamir to accept the principle of exchanging land for
peace. American Jews were sharply divided over the letter.

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JESSE JACKSON stirred black and Jewish emotions — in different directions — with his strong showing in
the Democratic primaries, finishing second to Michael Dukakis. Jackson's support of a Palestinian
homeland angered Jews, many of whom say they will vote Republican this fall for fear of his gaining a key
position in a Democratic administration.

POLITICS

126

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1988

GEORGE BUSH held off a

number of fellow Republicans
in the primaries to breeze to a
presidential nomination in
New Orleans, where his
impressive acceptance speech
was overshadowed by his
appointment of Sen. Dan
Quayle as running mate.

MAYOR ED KOCH of New
York infuriated Jesse Jackson
and his supporters when he
said that Jews would "have to
be crazy" to vote for Jackson.
Koch supported Albert Gore in
the New York primary.

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