100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 26, 1988 - Image 145

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-08-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Rosh Hashanah: A Time Of Hope, Happiness

Each month in this space, L'Chayim will present a Yiddish lesson
entitled, "Du Redst Yiddish (Do You Speak Yiddish?)," whose aim is to
encourage further study of Yiddish. The lesson will include a brief story
utilizing the Yiddish words to be studied, a vocabulary list with English
translations and a family activity which involves using the new words. Two
books which may be helpful for beginning Yiddish students are "Yiddish
for Beginners" by Dr. Joffen and "Der Yiddisher Lerer" by Goldin.
Weinreich's "English-Yiddish Dictionary" also may be useful. At the
conclusion of each lesson will be a suggested list of books for persons who
wish to further their knowledge.
The lessons were prepared by Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's Circle.
Following is this month's lesson:
I always look to Rosh Hashanah as tseit of hofehnung. This is a time I
like to put the trauerkeit of lehtstin year to ruh. This is a time to hahnoeh
hobn the weather, not zumer hays or vinter kahlt. This is a special time to
opshahtsin the mehntshin who give meaning to my lehbin. What a joy to
see them gehklayt in their neieh holiday clothes, to see the table bandehkt
in our best leivunt, zilber and stemware. The good ehsenvarg we eat at this
time, the roasted hindl or flaysh, the potatoes, the grins, the vein and, most
symbolic of the holiday, the ehpel dipped in hawnik for a sweet year. Also,
symbolically, a keilechik challah that signifies the aybik nature of life,
without a beginning and without an end.
A new yor filled with good hopes for unz ahlehmehn.

Vocabulary

tseit
hofehnung
trauerkeit
lehtstin
ruh
hahnoeh
hobn
zumer
hays
vinter
kahlt
opshahtsin
mehntshin
lehbin
gehklayt
neieh
bandehkt
leivunt
zilber
ehsenvarg
hindl
flaysh

time
hope
sadness
last
rest
enjoy
enjoy
summer
hot
winter
cold
appreciate
people
life
dressed
new
covered
linen
silver
food
chicken
meat

Yom Kippur Crossword

grins
vein
ehpel
hawnik
keilechik
aybik
yor
unz
ahlehmehn

salad
wine
apple
honey
round
ongoing, perpetual
year
us
all (everybody)

Recommended
Reading

"The Shofar That Lost Its
Voice" by Fass. A book for children
age 8-10.
"The Jewish Festivals" by H.
Schauss.

Family Activity

Invite someone who would
otherwise be alone to come to your
dinner.

2

1

1

Across:

1. The act of not eating any food or drinking any liquid.
2. Common name for Yom Kippur
3. Hebrew word for repentance
4. Bible story read on Yom Kippur
5. Date of Yom Kippur
6. The number of times the Kol Nidre prayer is chanted
7. Traditional three-cornered, meat-stuffed Yom Kippur food
8. Closing Yom Kippur prayer service
9. How man talks to God

3

I I I

2

6

5

1■ 1101•1

4

ii i

C

Down:

1. Special candle lit in memory of someone who has died
2. Number of days Yom Kippur is celebrated
3. Ceremony using a live animal that allows a person to transfer their
sins onto the animal
4. Hebrew name for the Sabbath between Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur:
The Sabbath of Return
5. Wrongdoing
6. Animal used in Kapporot ceremony
7. Evening prayer service/major Yom Kippur prayer

8

Answers to Choose From:

Chicken
Jonah
Kreplach
Prayer
Tenth

Day of Atonement
Kapporot
Neilah
Shabbat Shuvah
Teshuvah
Yahrtzeit

Fasting
Kol Nidre
One
Sin
Three

n

7

II I C

9

Answers on Page L-7

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-5

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan