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July 22, 1988 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FRIDAY, JULY 22, 1988

Dutch Leaders On
Visit To Israel

Jerusalem (JTA) — Prime
Minister Ruud Lubbers and
Foreign Minister Hans van
den Broek of the Netherlands
have agreed to establish a
joint working group with
Israel to consider the route
Jewish emigrants will take
leaving the Soviet Union.
Holland is directly con-
cerned because its embassy in
Moscow issues Israeli visas to
Soviet Jews who have ob-
tained exit permits. The
Netherlands has represented
Israeli interests in the USSR
since Moscow broke diplo-
matic relations with Israel in
1967.
The Israeli Cabinet decided
recently that in the future,
Jews leaving the Soviet
Union on the strength of
Israeli visas must pick them
up at the Israel Embassy in
Bucharest, Romania, from
where they are to fly directly
to Aviv.
According to reports of last
Monday's meeting, Lubbers
objected to the scheme on
grounds that Soviet Jews
should have freedom of choice
about where to settle. The
issue also has sparked con-
troversy in the Soviet emigre
community here and among
Jewish leaders overseas.

The Israelis say that Soviet
Jews would be free to settle
elsewhere, if they so wished,
after coming to Israel. But
once they arrived in Israel,
they would lose their refugee
status and could be forced to
wait several years for entry
into the United States or
other Western countries.
The Cabinet decision would
be moot without Dutch,
Soviet and Romanian cooper-
ation. Peres seemed hopeful
that the proposed joint work-
ing group would produce an
understanding.
Meanwhile, the six mem-
bers of an Israeli consular
delegation due to go to
Moscow are expected to
receive their entry visas
momentarily. They will pick
them up at the Hague en-
route to the Soviet Union.
Israelis hope the delegation
eventually will be allowed to
issue visas, a routine consular
function. The Soviets insist
that is not within the purview
of their visit, for the time
being.
The Israeli delegation will
reciprocate the visit of the
Soviet consular team that has
been in Israel since June
1987.

,

Reform Rabbis Urge
Support For Pollards

COMPLIMENTARY
GIFT
WRAPPING

42

I

New York (JTA) — In a
resolution passed unanimous-
ly by the executive board of
the Central Conference of
American Rabbis (CCAR),
Reform rabbis called upon the
entire Reform movement to
express support for Jonathan
Pollard, who is serving a life
sentence for selling classified
intelligence data to Israel,
and for his wife, Anne, who is
serving a five-year sentence
as an accomplice.
CCAR is a 1,500-member
worldwide organization of
Reform rabbis. The organiza-
tion last week proposed that
major Jewish and Christian
organizations "encourage the
United States government to
re-evaluate the Pollard case,
and to insure that the
Pollards be treated with
fairness and equity during
their incarceration?'
Specific concern focuses on
what the CCAR describes as
inadequate medical treat-
ment for Anne Henderson
Pollard, who suffers from a
rare gastrointestinal disorder.
Only when her condition
reached the verge of being im-

mediately life-threatening
did she receive care from a
Mayo Clinic physician at a
prison near Rochester, Minn.,
according to the CCAR.
Jonathan Pollard recently
ended a week-long hunger
strike to protest his wife's
health care and to call atten-
tion to his own deteriorating
conditions in prison.

Conservative
Rabbis Ordained

New York (JTA) — The Con-
servative movement in Israel,
known there by the Hebrew
name Masorati (traditional),
will ordain the first Israeli-
trained rabbis to serve the
Israeli Conservative com-
munity in ceremonies at the
Mt. Scopus campus of Hebrew
University, a spokesperson for
the Jewish Theological
Seminary, the spiritual base
of the Conservative move-
ment here, said last week.
Leaders of the Conservative
Jewish movement in America
are planning to attend the
ceremonies, which were

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