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June 24, 1988 - Image 76

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WilL")41,
Catch Our

SUPERIOR
FISH CO.

HOOK INTO THE VARIETY AT
THE HOUSE OF QUALITY

Fresh Alaskan

Fresh Florida

Fresh Applewood

SALMON
STEAKS

GROUPER
FILLETS

SMOKED
SALMON

$5.99.

5 6.95.

$5.25w

exp. 7/2/88

=

.17/^ 0,

exp. 7/2/88

0

Summer Sale!

• Bedcoverings • Window Treatments
• Pillows • Accessories

Kosher Expo

20% to 56% OFF

Continued from Page 66

SvatISS B=E° A F OS

L 999 S. Hunter, Birmingham • 644-5646

exp. 7/2/88

SUPERIOR FISH CO.
House of Quality

11 Mile

Serving Metropolitan Detroit for Over 40 Years

309 E. 11 Mile Rd., Royal Oak, MI • 541.4632

Parking in rear

Mon.-Wed. 8-5
Thurs. & Fri. 8-6
Saturday 8.1

LOOK FOR THIS EMBLEM AT

ME BER

DETROIT
RETAIL
ROSNER

MEAT
DEALERS
ASSOC.

MEMBER MARKETS OF THE
DETROIT AREA KOSHER RETAIL
MEAT DEALERS ASSOCIATION

•• •

• • • • • • • •

:Film To Video
• Transfer •

PRE JULY 4th SPECIALS

SUNDAY, JUNE 26th THROUGH THURSDAY, JUNE 30th

• Transfer Movies •
• 8mm-16mm • •
• To VHS or Beta •

EMPIRE FRESH/FROZEN

TURKEY- BURGERS . .

• • • • •

a

••

MIN & TURKEY FRANKS .



EMPIRE

BARBECUE CHICKEN Oven Ready/heat 'n serve

YOU CAN DEPEND ON OUR MEMBER MARKETS!

NEW ORLEANS
HARVARD ROW
KOSHER MEAT MARKET KOSHER MEAT MARKET

15600 W. 10 MILE RD.
Smithfield
569.1323

21780 W. 11 MILE RD.
Southfield
356-5110

SINGER'S
KOSHER MEATS

DEXTER-DAVISON
KOSHER MEAT MARKET

13521 W. 9 MILE RD.
Oak Park
LI 7-8111

COHEN & SON
KOSHER MEAT MARKET

26035 COOLIDGE
Oak Park
LI 7-4121

25760 COOLIDGE
Oak Park
LI 8-6800

BERNARD & SONS
KOSHER MEATS

29214 ORCHARD LAKE RD.
Farmington Hills
851-2788

OUR MEMBER MARKETS USE ONLY THE FINEST
AND FRESHEST OF GLOTT KOSHER MEATS. WE
DO NOT PRE-PACKAGE OUR MEATS AND POULTRY.
YOU, THE CONSUMING PUBLIC, HAVE THE RIGHT
TO SELECT YOUR MEAT AND POULTRY FROM A
DISPLAYED COUNTER. BE A NAME NOT A NUMBER
BY SHOPPING AT YOUR INDIVIDUAL MEMBER
KOSHER MEAT MARKET.

FOR HEALTH & QUALITY REASONS,
IT'S CHEAPER TO BUY KOSHER!

68

FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1988









1-200 FEET
201400 FEET
401-600 FEET
601-800 FEET
801-1000 FEET



$20.00 •
$26.00 •
$39.00 •
$52.00 •
$65.00 •

Film over 1,000 feet add 6; a foot. •
Tape $8.00 Additional.




; CC tRIPTUR. •

CfANNARA, •
• BUY—SELL—TRADE •

• 3017 N. Woodward, Royal Oak •

(3 Blks. South of 13 Mile)



Daily & Sat. 10-6, Fri. 10-8




288-5444

• • • • • • • • i • •

O D LO
O

L,AF
v En
SE' ALASKA ns

SEAFOOD
EXPRESS t--
,4 COMPANY

Seafood caught and packed
on ice and delivered to your
doorstep in 48 hours.

• KING SALMON
• SHRIMP
• ALASKAN KING
CRAB LEGS
• LOBSTER

352.3855

"There's not a fish market in
town that can match our
quality and price!!

expected to be a popular dish
at weddings and bar mitz-
vahs, some in food industry
predict.
Critics complain Jews
shouldn't be made to feel that
they're missing anything,
though. Moreover, they say,
emulating non-kosher foods is
merely a way of circumvent-
ing kashrut, Jewish dietary
laws. "Why should we say
that Jews haven't been enjoy-
ing the right things until
now?" complained Rabbi
Yosef Wikler, who edits
Kashrus Magazine. "It's a
media ploy that doesn't reflect
Jewish interests."
Judging by the number of
people eagerly gobbling up
the handouts, the verdict was
positive. "The way they drape
it over the edge of the dish,
you'd think it was real shrimp
salad," said Bebe Feld of
Massapequa Park, Long
Island. Eric Horowitz, a
20-year-old who manages Col-
umbia University's kosher
deli, liked the taste of the im-
itation crabmeat and said he
might consider stocking it.
It wasn't all food, though.
Elsewhere, exhibitors pro-
moted Israel as a safe haven
for tourism, aliyah and in-
vestment, hoping to dispel
fears about the effects of the
Palestinian uprising.
"I was more nervous walk-
ing the few blocks around
here," said Harvey Cohen, a
deputy director with Israel's
government tourist office,
which shared booth space
with El Al Airlines. He was
referring to the deserted
streets of midtown Manhat-
tan's west side.
Various charitable groups,
hoping to familiarize
American Jews with their
causes, sought assistance for
the Israeli army, downtrodden
Ethiopian and Syrian Jews,
and different social-services
projects. The Jewish National
Fund solicited contributions
that would be used for replan-
ting Israeli's forests, which
were reportedly set fire by
Palestinians.
Some groups complained of
U.S. media coverage and
sought a broader audience for
their messages. "There's a lot
of misinformation out there,"
said Shifra Hoffman, who has
an Israeli radio show and was
passing out literature about
atrocities committed against
Israeli soldiers.
At the World Zionist Organ-
ization booth, several hun-
dred browsers signed peti-
tions calling for the United
States to refrain from becom-
ing involved in Israel's
general elections this
November. Meir Kahane's
Kach party also had booth,
where JDL T-shirts were on
sale.

Another group was solicit-
ing donations to be used for
purchasing land in Jeru-
salem's Moslem quarter.
"Arabs are dying to sell to us,
they're getting top dollar,"
said Dr. Joseph Frager, a
board member of the Jeru-
salem Reclamation Project,
which claims to own about 25
properties in the quarter.
And sprinkled among the
controversial were others con-
cerned with the conventional:
Jewish stereotyping and
discrimination, and Jewish
needy in the United States.
Lilith magazine, for instance,
trumpeted a recent issue in
which it blasted the use of the
word "Jap" as a thinly
disguised means of downgrad-
ing Jewish women.
Surveying the scene from a
corner of the convention floor
was Rose Allen, a retired
senior citizen. Munching o _ n a
kasha varnishka sample, she
admitted that she doesn't
keep kosher but was fascin-
ated with the different foods
and messages to be gotten at
the booths. "I belong to the
old school and I've heard
much of this already," she
said. "But I'm here because
I'm Jewish and I want to be
with my own people."

'"'I LOCAL NEW±'

Society Installs
New Officers

The Radomer Aid Society
held its annual installation of
officers at the Zionist
Cultural Center on Tuesday.
Cocktails will be served at 7
p.m.
The newly elected officers
include: Oscar Tuttleman,
president; Nancy Ager and
Joseph Finkel, vice
presidents; Mae Weintraub,
Lillian Katz and Shirley
Finkel, secretaries; Robert
Dorn, treasurer; Sam Ager
and Louis Klein, trustees;
Mae Weintraub and Rita
Ager, sunshine committee;
Jean Feldman, publicity.

Jabotinsky
Celebration

The Jabotinsky Society of
Herut Zionists of America
will celebrate Israel's 40th
anniversary at 6 p.m. Sunday
at the United Hebrew Schools
building.
State Representative David
Gubow will be the guest
speaker. Ruth Savage will
sing Yiddish, Israeli and
English songs,
Dinner will be served.
Friends are invited. For reser-
vations, call Simon Cieck,
548-3073; or Sam Horning,
557-1847.

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