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March 25, 1988 - Image 153

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

acP t
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Pesah Is A Happy Family Holiday

Vocabulary

1°0

Each month in this space, L'Chayim will present a Yiddish lesson
entitled "Du Redst Yiddish (Do You Speak Yiddish?)" whose aim is to
encourage further study of Yiddish. The lesson will include a brief
story utilizing the Yiddish words to be studied, a vocabulary list with
English translations and a family activity which involves using the new
words. Two books which may be helpful for beginning Yiddish
students are Yiddish for Beginners by Dr. Joffen and Der Yiddisher
Lerer by Goldin. Weinreich's English-Yiddish Dictionary also may be
useful. At the conclusion of each lesson will be a suggested list of
books for persons who wish to further their knowledge.
The lessons were prepared by Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's
Circle.
Following is this month's lesson:
Pesah is a holiday full of fahrgehnign. Es kumt in friling, ven the
velt is coming to Iebn. The trees start showing blehtehr, some flowers
show a tsuzug to bloom and the tuft is balmy and sweet.
The gahntseh family come together for a seder. Yehder is
ongehtun in holiday clothes. The tish is beautifully bandehkt with a
white tishtach, a liechtehr, a Passover plate. The father dertsaylt the
Passover mieseh. The youngest kind asks the four frahgehs.
Ehsenvarg is served. Usually, eggs in salt vahser, gefilte fish, zup
with matza balls, chicken and kawmpawt. One drinks four glehzer
wine. It is vichtik to remember that Passover is a celebration of freiheit
from knechtshaft.

fahrgehnign
es
kumt
friling
ven
velt
Iebn
blehtehr
tsuzug
luft
gahntseh
yehder
ongehtun
tish
bandehkt
tishtach
liechtehr
dertsaylt
mieseh
kind
frahgehs
ehsenvarg
vahser
zup
kawmpawt

glehzer
vichtik
freiheit
knechtshaft

glasses
important
freedom
slavery

pleasure
it
comes
spring (season)
when
world
Have various members of the
life
family
participate in the reading of
leaves
promise the Haggada, wherever
air .appropriate. Have the children take
whole part in the preparation of the
each one Passover seder plate — the making
dressed of haroset and the like. If you know
table of someone who will be alone on
covered Passover, invite them to your seder.
tablecloth
candelabra
tells
story
child
The Jewish Holiday Book by
questions
food Wendy Lazar; Holiday Work and
water Play, Joyce Fischman; Passover —
soup In Song and Story, Rabbi Charles
compote Wengrov.

Family Activity

Recommended
Reading

co p Want A Pen Pal? Write

covi

To A Family In Russia

One way to learn about Jewish
life around the world is to write to a
Jewish family in another country.
What is daily life like in the pen
pal's country? What is Jewish life
like? How are the holidays
celebrated? To help our readers
learn about Jews around the world,
L'Chayim is making available
addresses of Jewish families in
communities abroad.
This month, the address of
Russian Jewish refuseniks was
made available by the Detroit Soviet
Jewry Committee of the Jewish
Community Council. Before writing,
please read these special rules for
corresponding with Russian Jews:
Letters should be personal,
warm, sympathetic, and should ask
about birthdays, anniversaries and
family events. Cards should be
exchanged on these occasions and
on the Jewish holidays as well.
Avoid any anti-Soviet material and
refrain from mentioning names of
Soviet Jewry rescue organizations.
Russian, Yiddish, Hebrew or
English may be used. The standard
way to address a letter to the Soviet
Union is the reverse of the
American way: USSR, Name of
Republic, Name of City, Address,
Addressee (last name first). The fee
is 44 cents per 1/2 ounce, up to two
ounces.
This month's refusenik family is

that of Grigory and Natalia
Rozenshtein.
A computer scientist,
Rozenshtein worked at the Science
Research Institute for Instrument
Automization, where he used
computer applications in his
research on the structure of the
human brain. In 1974, in anticipation
of filing an application to emigrate
to Israel, Rozenshtein resigned from
his job at the institute. Later that
year, he applied with his family for
an exit visa. A refusal was received
based on his alleged access to
"state secrets" to which he was
exposed in 1965.
The Rozenshteins are two of
the leading Soviet Jewish activists
in Moscow. In November 1974, they
conducted a two-week hunger strike
to protest the Soviet authorities'
refusal to let them emigrate to
Israel. On Jan. 9, 1979, Mrs.
Rozenshtein and ther youngest son,
Efraim, demonstrated near the
Science Research Institute for
Instrument Automization, in order to
draw attention to their plight.
The Rozenshteins are Orthodox
and raised their children in the
traditional religious manner.
Letters of support can be sent
to the Rozenshteins by writing them
as follows: USSR, RSFSR, Moscow
117485, Butlerova 2-1-69,
Rozenshtein, Grigory.

TOYS AND GAMES

The Mentchkins Puzzle (two sizes: 54 pieces, 100
pieces), Brachot puzzle (100 pieces), both at Borenstein's.

BOOKS

The Holocaust Haggada, Diasporah Haggada, both at
Spitzer's. The ArtScroll Youth Haggada and The Animated
Haggada, both at Spitzer's and Borenstein's. The
Passover Haggada: Legends and Customs, Rabbi
Menachem Hacohen and Haim Ron; Fadel: The Cat That
Left Egypt, Norman Geller; Passover, June Behrens; I
Love Passover, Marilyn Hirsch; Jewish Holiday Fun, Judith
Hoffman Corwin; The Yeshiva University Haggada;
cookbook, Something Different for Passover, Zell J.
Schulman, all at Borenstein's.

AUDIO CASSETTES

Cindy Paley Presents a Singing Seder; Come to My
Seder, Paul Zim, both at Borenstein's and Spitzer's. Mosty
Matza, Fran Avni; Yanky at the Pesah Seder with Zeyde,

both at Borenstein's.

VIDEO CASSETTES

Animated Haggada, book and video cassette, at
Spitzer's.

Spitzer's is located at 21770 W 11 Mile, Southfield.
Borenstein's is located at 25242 Greenfield, Oak Park.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-5

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