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March 19, 1988 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I SOVIET JEWRY 1

"NO MONEY DOWN"

casual
living
modes

- CUSTOM LEASE PLANS -

ALL
MAKES & MODELS
FOREIGN or DOMESTIC

LOWER
MONTHLY
PAYMENTS

1988 OLDS CUTLASS

SUPREME
$19748 PER MO. •

• AUTO. TRANS. • TINT GLASS •
• AIR COND. • REAR DEFOG. •
MUCH, MUCH MORE

CUSTOM QUOTE
354-0570
ALAN OR MIKE

• FREE LOANER •

• FLEXIBLE TERMS •

GLASSMAN

LEASING

TELEGRAPH AND 12 MILE RD.
• SOUTHFIELD •

•60 MONTH CLOSED END NON-MAINTENANCE LEASE WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
LESSEE HAS NO OBLIGATION TO PURCHASE VEHICLE AT LEASE END BUT DOES
HAVE THE OPTION TO PURCHASE AT S4900.00. LESSEE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EX-
CESSIVE WEAR AND TEAR. S500.00 SEC. DEP. PLUS FIRST MONTH PAYMENT RE-
QUIRED. MULTIPLY BY 60 TO GET TOTAL PAYMENT. PLUS 4% USE TAX & LIC. PLT.
EXCESSIVE MILEAGE CHARGE .08' PER MILE OVER 75,000 MILES.

-I)

contemporary
• furniture
• lighting
• wall decor
• gifts
• interiors

ELIZABETH KAPLAN

Staff Writer

Contemporary
accessories
for over
34 years

544.1711

22961 Woodward, Ferndale, MI

HUNTERS SQUARE
TALLY HALL

ORCHARD LAKE ROAD AT FOURTEEN MILE • FARMINGTON HILLS • 855-3444

34 stores
and services
to fulfill your
fashionable image

DON'T MISS OUR SPRING FASHION SHOW
FRIDAY - MARCH 18
SATURDAY MARCH 19
12:30 PM IN TALLY HALL

30 FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1988

Kosharovskys Begin
New Hunger Strike

uli and Inna Kosha-
rovsky of Moscow,
who were joined by
numerous Detroit area
residents in their recent
17-day fast, have decided to
indefinitely extend their
hunger strike.
Yuli Kosharovsky, who has
waited longer than any other
Soviet Jew for permission to
emigrate, began the fast with
his wife on March 10, the
17th anniversary of his first
refusal.
Since applying to leave for
Israel, Kosharovsky lost his
job and he and his family
have been frequently harass-
ed by the KGB. Kosharovsky
has been placed under house
arrest and charged with
"hooliganism."
Local Soviet Jewry activists
have initiated several pro-
grams to help draw attention
to the family's plight.
Celia Wilson, who has been
working for more than 11
years on behalf of the
Kosharovskys, is asking in-
dividuals to sign petitions
that will be mailed to OVIR,
the Soviet emigration office.
The petitions cite Soviet of-
ficials' constant rejection of
the Kosharovskys' visa ap-
plications, and ask that the
family be given permission to
leave for Israel.
Wilson also has been speak-
ing about the Kosharovskys
to groups throughout the ci-
ty. Late last week, she ad-
dressed students at Akiva
Hebrew Day School, where
students agreed to send a let-
ter every day to the
Kosharovskys.
And members of B'nei
Akiva throughout the nation
held a fast on March 10 in
solidarity with the refusenik
family. The youth group is
planning several events to
help publicize the case of and
support the Kosharovskys.
On March 10, Rep. William
Broomfield (R-Birmingham)
joined in the campaign sup-
porting the Kosharovksys
with a statement in the
House. In the prepared state-
ment, Broomfield said that
"In the spirit of glasnost it is
my most sincere hope that the
Soviet government will honor
its commitments as
signatories to the Helsinki ac-
cords. The most these in-
dividuals ask for is the oppor-
tunity to live their lives in
peace, in the country of their
own choosing."
Meanwhile, Sen. Carl Levin

y

(D-Mich.) just returned from
a trip to the Soviet Union,
where he met with a number
of refuseniks, including
Kosharovsky, and top Soviet
officials.
Levin, in an interview at
his Washington office, said he
stressed in his talks with
Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze that
relations between the two
countries would improve if he
allowed for increased emigra-
tion and decreased state in-
terference in religious
practices.
Levin said he cited specific
cases of individuals being
harassed for attempts to prac-
tice their religion freely.
Although the senator said
he found talks with Shevard-
nadze very productive, his
meeting with Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev was less
successful.
Gorbachev, he said, "was
rattling off his rhetoric"
about the non-existence of
human rights problems.
Levin said the talks were
"not particularly productive."
One of the refuseniks with
whom Levin met while in the
Soviet Union was Izabel Shte-
ingardt, mother of Detroiter
Svetlana Braun. Levin
delivered photos from the
wedding of Svetlana and
Keith Braun.
Levin also met with Ari and
Mila Volvolsky, the adopted
family of Congregation Beth
Shalom who also have family
in Detroit, and refuseniks
Abe and Michael Stolar.
Abe Stolar is an American
citizen who, as a child, settl-
ed in the Soviet Union with
his parents. He has been try-
ing to emigrate since 1974.
Levin has been extremely
active on behalf of Stolar, in-
cluding issuing an appeal last
month to President Reagan.
In his statement, Levin states
that, "Many longtime
refuseniks were allowed to
leave the Soviet Union in
1987, and we rejoice in their
freedom. But what do these
highly publicized cases mean
for the Stolars and others who
wait like them?
"Enough is enough. It is
time that this U.S. citizen be
allowed to leave the Soviet
Union with his family."

Genocide Law

Washington, D.C. — The
Anti-Defamation Legaue of
B'nai B'rith called on the
House of Representatives to
incorporate the crime of
genocide into the criminal
law of the United States.

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