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December 11, 1987 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Rally

Continued from Page 23

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Marching down Constitution Avenue.

HUMAN RIGHTS PLEA

or Soviet Jewry

Speaker:
Daniel C.P. Grossman

Human Rights Officer
U.S. Department of State
Office of Soviet Union Affairs

• Known as a great friend and advocate on behalf of refuseniks when he served as political-economic officer in the
Consulate General in Leningrad with responsibility for reporting on human rights developments

• Reviews Soviet adherence to international agreements that guarantee basic rights, such as the freedom of religion,
speech, and movement to all people

• Studied at Leningrad State University

• Directed national, grass roots educational campaign about the Soviet Union, sponsored by Ground Zero, a non-
partisan nuclear war education project

2:00 PM. Sunday, December 13, 1987
Congregation Shaarey Zedek
27375 Bell Road at Eleven Mile Road
Southfield, Michigan

Convened by the Michigan Region of Women's American 0.1ZT and the Soviet Jewry Committee
of the Jewish Community Council

NO ADMISSION CHARGE

CO-SPONSORS: American Women for Bar-Ilan University, Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, B'nai B'rith Metropolitan
Detroit Council, B'nai B'rith Women's Council of Metropolitan Detroit, Congregation B'nai David, Ecumenical Institute
forJewish/Christian Studies, Friends of the SovietJewry Education and Information Center, Greater Detroit Interfaith Round
Table of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Hadassah/Greater Detroit Chapter, Hillel Day School, Jewish Welfare
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26

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1987

songs. And therein lies a tale.

For while organizers
stressed the fact that
virtually every segment of
the Jewish community
participated in the rally, the
right-wing element of the
Orthodox movement did not.
In part because some of their
leaders, including Rabbi
Eliezer Schach of Israel, came
out against the rally on
grounds that it would be
harmful to the Jews of Russia
to protest and that quiet
diplomacy is the favored
policy. The small Agudas
Harabonim organization
came out publicly against the
rally. The powerful Agudath
Israel movement in this
country maintained a neutral
position on the rally, neither
condemning it nor taking
part in it.
In Baltimore, the Ner Israel
Rabbinical College,
Talmudical Academy, Torah
Institute and Bais Yaakov
School for Girls had agreed —
after some varying degrees of
reluctance, according to in-
siders — to participate in the
rally. But when it was learn-
ed during the final week that
Mary Travers would be per-
forming, in violation of the
Halachic prohibition against
Jewish men hearing a woman
singing, they withdrew their
participation.
Nationally, according to
Gerald Strober, about 50,000
people attended from the
greater Washington area and
more than 30,000 from the
New York area.

Organizers now admit that
they had expected between
70,000 and 80,000 people,
with the weather and the
Washington area turnout be-
ing the single biggest un-
knowns. They arranged for a
sound system to accom-
modate about 120,000 people,
which is why almost half of
the crowd never heard the
program, much less saw the
speakers.
But despite that frustra-
tion, those who attended ex-
pressed a sense of deep
satisfaction at having taken
part personally in such an
historic occasion. "There was
a sense of being part of a
larger whole," noted Maggi
Gaines. "It's not often that
you feel that your presence
can make a difference, but
this time it was true."
She and others noted that
the rally not only bolstered
the cause of Soviet Jewry but
the American Jewish com-
munity's feelings about itself.
Leonard Fein, the author,
said the rally transcended na-
tional politics and national
Jewish politics. "Fifteen
years ago," he said, "when
this movement started, the
Soviets figured they would
wait three months and the
tumult would die down. But
this community has hung in
for 15 years, and seen several
hundred thousand Jews
allowed to leave the USSR,
and maybe the Kremlin is
beginning to believe that our
rhetoric is true: we're not go-
ing to go away or be quiet un-
til the Soviet Jews are out."



White Hat

Continued from preceding page

pick up a brown bag as they
passed through the boarding
gate. Borman's had provided
877 bagels with lox and
cream cheese and a container
of orange juice. While
Michael Berke helped
distribute the Tauber
doughnuts on Plane C,
Tauber used the plane's
public address system to issue
demonstration instructions,
set the tone for the rally, and
thank Gilbert and Stuart
Borman, who were aboard.
"This sure brings back

memories," said Southfield
Judge Susan Moiseev. "I
haven't done anything like
this since 1972 when I stood
in front of the White House to
protest the bombings in Cam-
bodia."
Another veteran of many
demonstrations, Detroit black
leader Horace Sheffield, com-
mented that he was glad to be
going along "to give our sup-
port." Sheffield was part of an
11-member contingent from
the Council of Black Trade
Unions. "It's all part of the

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