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December 11, 1987 - Image 114

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BOOKS

ANNOUNCING THE GRAND OPENING OF

mobiltronics
west MIN

r 9 DRIVE-IN

)0 CELLULAR
sales • service • installation
Limited Time Offer
Buy A New
Hands Free Cellular
Mobile Telephone
INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

mt MITSUBISHI

A Survivor's Tour

$795.00*

mobiltronics west

mobiltronics east

626.8480

Ca

Of The Holocaust

ABRAHAM H. FOXMAN

585-4520

an authorized

AMERITECHTM COVERAGE

agent

a division of TRAC COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS
AUTHORIZED RESELLER

• Roaming in over 170 cities in the U.S.A. and
Canada • more cells for greater call capacity •
free roaming in Windsor — pay local cellular
rates only.

*Offer expires 12/31/87 or while supplies last. Prices good on mobile unit only. No dealers. No take withs. Installation,

Ameritech activation and minimum 90 day service required.

Three Varieties of Fruit?

APPLE and ORANGE and BUCKWHEAT

Yes, you know apples and oranges are fruit, but did you know that Kasha
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an economical food high in balanced protein . . . and it's delicious, too!

For a FREE recipe leaflet, write to:
The Birkett Mills, Penn Yan, NY 14527
and discover the world of the UNSUNG FRUIT!

because...
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15t OFF I

STORE COUPON

on any

one package of Wolff's KASHA I
ROASTED BUCKWHEAT KERNELS

TO THE DEALER: This coupon agencies. Coupons are non-
I
will be redeemed only as transferrable and void if use is
follows: For amount specified prohibited, taxed, restricted or n
plus 8c for handling, provided license is required. Customer 55
coupon is received from cus- must pay any sales tax. Cash rn
tomer on purchase of listed mer- redemption value 1/100c. FOR
chandise. Proof of purchase of REDEMPTION, PRESENT TO
sufficient stock of merchandise OUR SALESMAN OR MAIL TO
to cover coupons submitted THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN C
must be shown on request. VAN, NEW YORK 14527. OFFER 1 / I
(Failure to comply may void all GOOD ONLY IN U.S.A. LIMIT
coupons submitted for redemp- ONLY ONE COUPON MAY BE
tion.) Redemptions not honored REDEEMED PER UNIT OF
I
through brokers or other outside PRODUCTS PURCHASED.

Limit one coupon per purchase.

The Birkett Mills, Penn Yan, New York 14527
This coupon expires Dec. 31, 1988

STORE COUPON

NM NM NM MI =MN= =INN

102

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1987

=MI MI NM MN Ell NM

15t OFF

NM NM

I

I

If I had the power, I would
compel all who deny the fact
of the Holocaust to read I
Shall Live — Surviving
Against All Odds, 1939-1945
by Henry Orenstein (Beaufort
Books). It is a simply told ac-
count of atrocity piled upon
atrocity which Orenstein
either suffered or witnessed.
This is not a work of the im-
agination, like Dante's Infer-
no, but harrowing personal
experience. It is a descent in-
to the hell of the Holocaust
guided by a survivor, a man
with mathematical gifts, who
estimated the odds of his sur-
viving the experience at
about one in 4,650.
He narrates a tragic yet
riveting story as he testifies
for the six million who did not
survive to bear witness for
themselves. In the dedication,
he says he wrote the book at
the inspiration and urging of
his wife; but only a fierce, ir-
resistible compulsion could
have motivated him to relive
even in memory the horrors
he endured and witnessed in
an odyssey that took him
from Poland to the Soviet
Union then back to Poland, as
he and the rest of his family
sought to flee the invading
Wehrmacht and SS murder-
ers, and then, after his cap-
ture, to the Budzyn, Ma-
jdanek, Plaszow, Ravensbruck
and Sachsenhausen death
camps in both Poland and
Germany.
The book's details are
permeated with authenticity.
You are there, see events with
his eyes, feel his despair not
only of his own situation but
also at the apparent invin-
cibility of the Nazi war
machine and, ultimately,
share with him his growing
hopes of survival as the for-
tunes of war are reversed.
It is remarkable that his
tale is told so baldly and
calmly, without embellish-
ment or histrionics. Never-
theless, the impact of the
bestiality piled upon brutali-
ty is cumulative, overwhelm-
ing the reader with the elo-
quence of truth.
told
is
His
story
chronologically, starting with
a reconstruction of his
childhood and adolescence in
Hubrieszow, a town in which
Jews lived among Poles,
though completely separated

Abraham H. Foxman is national
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

from them. He recalls it as
hard "shtetl" life but one in
which his father prospered so
that he and his family were
comparatively affluent. Anti-
Semitism was accepted like
an element of nature,
although the author recalls
with pride how his father
bravely reacted to overt in-
cidents of Jew-baiting.
It was a close-knit family
which held together even dur-
ing the stresses and strains of
the first years of the war, but
which was eventually
separated under the
relentless pressure of the
Nazi Final Solution. Never-
theless, he and two of his
brothers managed to remain
together as they were
transferred from camp to
camp.
Throughout the book,
Orenstein relates the events
of the war as counterpoints to

You are there, see
events with his
eyes and feel his
despair.

his own predicament. First,
there was the belief that the
Allies would smash Hitler,
then the crushing swift defeat
of Poland, leading to his flight
into the Soviet Union and the
disillusionment of the Nazi-
Soviet pact which dismem-
bered Poland.
When the Nazis poured in-
to the USSR, Orenstein
witnessed the warmth with
which the Ukrainians
welcomed the invaders. It
leads him to assert in an
editorial note that'Hitler's
greatest blunder" was his
treatment of the local
populace, most of whom
"hated Stalin, his Com-
munist regime and his party?'
With the Red Army in pell-
mell route, Orenstein and his
father returned to Poland,
where they had left his
mother and sister, believing
that they would not be harm-
ed. Orenstein writes that
even in 1941 "except for some
pessimists, Jews and non-
Jews alike found it hard to
believe that Germany, a na-
tion of poets, philosophers,
musicians and scientists, a
nation that gave the world
Beethoven, Goethe and Kant,
would embark on a program
of brutal mass extermination
of all Jews, including inno-
cent little children, old
helpless people and women."
So they returned with much
hardship to a reunited fami-
ly, but also to a nightmare of

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