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December 11, 1987 - Image 113

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ble past on wooden wagons
pulled by donkeys. There is
the occasional affluent villa.
Lots of mosques.
The Israeli Army is also a
highly-visible presence. There
are jeeps laden with troops
patrolling the road; army
camps commanding the hill-
tops; a systematic network of
roadblocks presaged by coils
of barbed wire.
These roadblocks have now
become targets for Gaza's
"drive-in" gunmen. One day
last month, a motorist pulled
up at one such checkpoint,
shot a soldier dead at point-
blank range and drove off.
Gaza, in short, looks like
trouble.
A tiny thumb of land that
runs down the Mediterranean
coast for some 20 miles before
disappearing into the wastes
of the Sinai Desert, Gaza is
one of the most densely
populated areas on earth.
Crammed into its 140
square miles is a stateless
population of 634,000 — 4,500
per square mile — with 59 per
cent under the age of 19.
Compounding the problem
of endemic overcrowding and
poverty is the fact that fully
182,000 Gaza residents —
more than one in four — are
second- and third-generation
refugees living in squalid
camps and shanty towns.
Attempts by the Israeli
military administration to
resettle the refugees — at a
rate of 615 families a year
have hardly scratched the
surface of the problem; in-
deed, demographers predict
that by the year 2000 the
population will have reached
one million.
By then, according to a
report published in Israel last
week, the camps and slums
will have become advanced
breeding grounds for "serious
social deviations" — crime,
drugs, delinquency, unem-
ployment and radical politics
— problems that will be fur-
ther aggravated by an acute
shortage of land and water.
Added to these combustible
ingredients are 2,500 Jewish
settlers, who have been
assigned half the available
State lands, and official plans
to settle a total of 30,000 Jews
in Gaza by the turn of the cen-
tury. Given such conditions,
the growth of religious
fanaticism among the Palesti-
nians of Gaza seemed almost
preordained.

The irony is that the Israeli
military authorities, in a
disastrous miscalculation, ac-
tually encouraged the

phenomenon, believing that
religious fundamentalism
would undermine the in-
fluence of the PLO.
They were clearly not
counting on the willingness of
Gaza's religious leaders —
who belong to the pragmatic
Sunni stream of Islam — to
borrow the techniques and
philosophy of the revolu-
tionary Shi'ite Muslims of
Iran and Lebanon. _
Indeed, according to reports
in the Israeli media last
week, Iranian money is now
financing the activities of
Islamic Jihad not only in
Gaza, but also in the West
Bank.
Over the years, Islamic
organizations, under the
guise of establishing youth
clubs, kindergartens and self-
help projects, were allowed to
receive money from abroad
(particularly from Egypt and
Saudi Arabia) and were per-
mitted to build mosques,
whose number has grown
from 70 to 180 over the past 20
years.
The Islamic College, estab-
lished with the blessing of the
Israeli authorities in 1978,
now has 4,600 students and
has become the focus of
radical religious activism,
precisely as West Bank
universities have provided
the seedbed for nationalist
activity.
Religious revival is evident
throughout Gaza. Increasing-
ly, young men and women
have taken to wearing tradi-
tional robes and head cover-
ings, and there is growing
pressure on the rest of the
Palestinian population to con-
form to the strict code of
Islamic law. Those who open-
ly defy such pressure are sub-
ject to harassment from the
Islamic zealots: shop owners
who sell liquor or cassette
tapes of modern music are
beaten up; Western-style wed-
ding feasts are broken up by
chanting demonstrators.
Gaza residents are also be-
ing vigorously "encouraged"
to attend the traditional Fri-
day prayers, where they are
exposed to anti-Israel
diatribes by local religious
leaders.
Nor is the influence of
Islamic extremism likely to
be contained in Gaza. The
great fear among Israelis is
that the ideology of Holy War
will spread to the 750,000
Palestinians of the West
Bank, many of whom have
grown cynical of the empty
PLO hype over the past 20
years.

The way Chef Boyardee prepares cheese ravioli and
macaroni shells, you'd think he was a Jewish mother. He
uses only the finest ingredients: rich, ripe tomatoes,
aged cheese and enriched wheat flour. So his pasta is not
only delicious, it's also 95% fat-free, contains complex
carbohydrates and has no preservatives.
So for cheese ravioli and macaroni shells with all the
good things your mother would use, you can thank good-
ness for Chef Boyardee.

Macaroni
Shells

Foo d Prod c is Inc

No one
mothers pasta
like Chef Boyardee

Thank Goodness for Chef Boyardee

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
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A HEALTHY IDEA FROM



FISH FILLET CREOLE

3 tablespoons
FLEISCHMANN'S
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1/2 cup chopped green
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cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic. crushed
1 ( 1 0- ounce) can low
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cut up

Sweet UNSALTED

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corn oil

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, melt 1 table-
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in
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Add 3 fillets: cook 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until fish
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Kosher

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The next time you want to make something
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One bite and you'll agree: There s never

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FLEISCHMANN'S GIVES EVERY MEAL
A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.

'2 teaspoon basil leaves
: teaspoon ground black
Pepper
6 flounder or sole fillets
(about 11/2 pounds)
3 tablespoons
all-purpose flour
3 cups fresh leaf spinach
steamed lemon wedges .

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS 101

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