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October 09, 1987 - Image 80

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BEST OF EVERYTHING

11 1

Mystery Muncher

725 South Hunter
Birmingham

Continued from preceding page

smar

Reservations
642-6900

CANCER
c AIIIIERICAN
SOCIETY'



GREAT LITE SUPPERS

. s SALOON



FAMILY
RIALTO

PIANO ENTERTAINMENT



SINGE 1926



RESTAURANT

22740 WOODWARD AVE., Just South of 9 Mile Rd. • Ferndale

544-7933

THANK YOU FOR HELPING MAKE OUR 61ST ANNIVERSARY SUCH
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS! BECAUSE OF YOUR GREAT SUPPORT,
WE ARE CONTINUING OUR FANTASTIC, UNBELIEVABLE OFFER!

2 FOR

COMPLETE DINNERS
ALL DAY, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

GOOD 7 DAYS
A WEEK !

.

YOUR CHOICES OF ANY COMPLETE DINNER!











FRESH BROILED WHITEFISH
FREH PICKEREL
ORANGE ROUGHY
FRESH FISH & CHIPS
FRESH ROASTED TURKEY
CHICKEN PARMESAN
VEAL PARMESAN
VEAL CUTLETS
BAR-B-Q RIBS











BAR-B-Q CHICKEN
BAR-B-Q RIBS & CHICKEN
BAR-B-Q RIBS & SHRIMP
BAR-B-Q CHICKEN & SHRIMP
ROAST SIRLOIN OF BEEF
CHOPPED SIRLOIN W/MUSHROOM SAUCE
SHISH KEBOB
LIVER & ONIONS OR BACON
ETC., ETC., ETC., ETC., ETC.

COMPLETE DINNERS

FOR TWO!

ALL DINNERS INCLUDE .. .
SOUP OR SALAD (TOSSED OR GREEK), POTATO (YOUR CHOICE)
OR SPAGHETTI, DESSERT (STRAWBERRY CHEESECAKE, ICE
CREAM, RICE PUDDING OR JELLO), BREAD BASKET
(INCL. STICKS) AND BEVERAGE (COFFEE OR HOT TEA)

COCKTAILS, BEER AND
WINE

OUR REGULAR HOURS ARE:
MON;-THURS, 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.

FRI. & SAT. 10:30 a.m.-11 p.m
SUN. 8 a.m.-10 p.m.

NO COUPON NECESSARY!

A TASTEFUL
TRADITION

Over the years, Chuck Muer restaurants- have
earned a reputation for excellence. Our daily
changing menu
the finest fresh fish,
_ features
. .
seafood
and pasta. Beautifully
presented in the
,
,
warm, relaxed atmos r pf our restauran

tr

Ch0.01e145 cra bb.

5498 Crooks Rd;

401 Depot Street
Ann Arbor, MI
(313) 769-0592

-11-0y, MI
(313)879-2060

When you're in Florida, be sure to join ud

CHUCK.:
HAROUYS

A CAFE

ehaRtetfp- eRC0a

chaRtect's CRC1 b

207 Royal POinciana Way 456 South Ocean Blvd.
Palm Beach, FL
Palm Beach, FL
(305) 659-1440
(305) 659-1500

chaRtey's eRab

1000 U.S. 1
Jupiter, FL
Opening December 1987

78

FRIDAY, OCT. 9, 1987

■ 11ME

Now —
breast cancer
has no place to hide
in Michigan.
Call us.

:

Lunches • Dinners • Sunday Brunch • Cocktails
Beautiful Banquet Facilities



111111111111111

420 Harding Circle
St. Armand's Key
Sarasota, FL
(813) 388-3964

cha R Ley's cRab

3000 N. East 32nd Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Opening January 1988

women started entering the
career world, they said good-
bye to cooking. Friedan decid-
ed she would cook when she
felt like it with a minimum of
fuss.
_ " 'We women had to
liberate ourselves from the
slavish necessities, the ex-
cessive drudgery and guilt
related to cooking in order to
be able to now liberate
ourselves from an excessive
need to react against it she
said. Friedan may be back in
the kitchen but restaurants
are filled with women who
work and those who don't but
shudder at the thought of
that lost art —. entertaining
at home.
"Back in 1977, Detroiters
were going to the dinner
theater at Botsford Inn to see
I Do! I Do! with perennial
favorites Phil Marcus Esser
and Nancy Gurwin. The price
was $13.50 per person.
"Some local folks were
enrolling in dance classes to
learn disco, swing and cha-
cha from Jack Barnes at
$2.50 a lesson. Minks were on
sale from $699 to $1,995.
"Omelettes were out and
crepes were in. Charity balls
were out and disco was in.
But you were assured that if
your tastes in food or enter-
tainment weren't popular, an
out could quickly become an
in.
"Once upon a time, people
made their own soup, simmer-
ing it for hours_ in a pot. As
the liquid bubbled, they add-
ed spices and herbs, meat and
fresh vegetables, sometimes
leftovers. The result was in-
deed 'rich' as Lewis Carroll
wrote. It tasted good. It was
nutritious, too.
"But homemade soup was a
lot of work. And so, a few
years after Lewis Carroll
wrote his song of praise to
homemade soup, 19th Cen-
tury technology brought forth
canned soup. Condensed soup
in a can was one of America's
first real convenience foods. It
was introduced by a small
New Jersey company then
called Jos. Campbell Preserve
Co.
"For a long while, Campbell
and its early rival, H.J. Heinz
Co., found the canned soup
business slow 'going. Back
around the turn of the cen-
tury, few people were convinc-
ed that canned rivaled
homemade. Sniffed the late
Amy Vanderbilt, 'In my own
childhood, canned foods of all
kinds were looked upon with
great disfavor?
"The newly-named Camp-
bell Soup Co. worked hard to
give canned soup a good im-
age. In expensive advertising
campaigns, the company
plugged flavor and quality

rather than convenience.
Typical was a 1940 radio com-
mercial in which the an-
nouncer, in honeyed tones,
described Campbell's
relatively new cream of
mushroom soup as having 'a
delicious, out-of-the ordinary
taste — a blending of fresh,
sweet cream, heavier even
than whipping cream, and
young cultivated mushrooms.
Mushroom flavor fills every

"If your tastes
weren't popular, an
out could quickly
become an in."

spoonful. Mushroom slices
abbund.'
"Eventually, Campbell's
campaign succeeded. In the
American pantry, cans of
soup — usually Campbell's
distinctive red and white cans
— became a staple. In the pot
on the stove, canned soup took
the place of homemade.
"True, today there's
something of a backlash
because of the new interest in
avoiding processed foods. The
pot of homemade soup is
again bubbling in some
American kitchens.
"But Campbell and its com-
petitors still sell more than
$900 million worth of soup
every year. It's clear that
canned soup will remain a
convenient, low-cost staple of
the American diet.
"Trouble is, most canned
soups don't taste very good.
And most aren't very
nutritious."

I ENTERTAINMENT I

Center Hosts
Music Class

"The Sound of Music," a
listener's guide to understan-
ding, has begun at the main
Jewish Community Center.
This series, which runs
through Nov. 3, will help the
listener appreciate the
classics. Symphonic music of
Mozart, Beethoven and
Shubert will be discussed.
Mark Kligman, who is cur-
rently pursuing his graduate
studies in music theory at the
University of Michigan, will
conduct the series. He has
composed, accompanied and
conducted music for a varie-
ty of ensembles and per-
formers, including many can-
tors and synagogue choirs. He
recently hosted a National
Public Radio-affiliated show
in Northridge, Calif.
There is a fee. For informa-
tion, call the Center,
661-1000, ext. 335.

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