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September 25, 1987 - Image 162

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I COOKING I

Coming Soon!

L'shanah
Tovah
from

Dance Studio

ELEGANT
FASHION

Barry Douglas
Call 6-81-41-01

EVENING WEAR
SPORTS WEAR
ACCESSORIES

Best Wishes To All
Our Customers & Friends
For A Healthy & Happy

"Special occasions
require
Special dresses"

NEW YEAR

ASAYA

And Staff Of

10-7 P.M. M-Sat.
10-5 Sun.

zet 9e4tote

Salon

29325 14 Mile • Corner of Middlebelt • Farmington Hills
Broadway Plaza • (313) 737-4483

-

.• .•

-



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77

_

""-"-"---
NOW
WIN

4

LAblq
RcSEA VMS
FLAG

Now

RESEALABLEI

3411100.
L

12M" 1987 GENERAL FOODS CORPORATION

ZIP•PAK" is a trademark Of Zip•Palc incorporated

158

FRIDAY, SEPT. 25, 1987

mG

ere ee

Kosher is a delicious tradition.

Yom Kippur: Before
And After The Fast

GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Special_to The Jewish News

undown tonight
marks the end of
Rosh Hashanah
5748, but the momentous
ten "Days of Awe" that
culminate with Yom Kippur
have just begun. Until next
Friday evening, we will con-
tinue to enjoy apples with
honey, round challah
filled with raisins, taiglah
and many other holiday
treats.
That Friday evening meal
will be particularly mean-
ingful for it will not only
welcome Shabbat, but will
also be our last chance to
dine before we begin the
Yom Kippur fast. In many
Jewish households, both the
erev Shabbat and pre-fast
meal traditionally feature
chicken soup. When I was a
child, my favorite holiday
addition to the wonderful
golden soup was delicious
meat-filled kreplah.
A month or so before Yom
Kippur, my mother would
start collecting bits of left-
over pot roast and steak,
and put them in a special
stash in the freezer. For her
homemade kreplah, the on-
ly suitable filling had to be
made from leftovers! When
she had enough, she would
grind the meat by hand in
her grinder, and add eggs
and seasonings. She made
and rolled out the noodle
dough completely by hand.
Once the kreplah were stuff-
ed and
boiled, the hardest part was
keeping them away from our
eager little mouths before
dinner time!
For our main dish, we had
the tender chicken from the
soup with some plain vege-
tables — a generally bland
meal to help keep the adults
from becoming overly thirs-
ty when they fasted. The
meal was always concluded
with grapes and tea which,
my mother had learned
from my grandmother, was

S

also supposed to alleviate
thirst.
most
with
As
Ashkenazim, my family
always broke the Yom Kip-
pur fast with a lavish assort-
ment of smoked fish and
dairy dishes — a sort of buf-
fet "brunch" served at
night. For this special meal,
my mom insisted on squeez-
ing fresh oranges for juice;
diluted frozen concentrate
just wasn't good enough.
And she often served her
homemade
delectable
She
cheese blintzes.
prepared almost all the food
beforehand, so that she had
a minimum of last-minute
cooking to do.
Of course, that is essential
for a Yom Kippur "break-
the-fast" because we cannot
cook during the holiday, and
no one wants to wait for food
once the stars are finally
visible in the night sky. The
ideal dishes are those
which: (1) require no
preparation or cooking, such
as purchased smoked fish
and chopped herring, (2) can
be made the day before the
holiday, such as chilled fruit
and vegetable salads, and (3)
can be made way ahead,
frozen, thawed during the
day, and then quickly
reheated just before serving,
such as some of those dishes
that follow.
Also included below are
some interesting drinks
which Jews from other lands
partake of to break their
fasts.

EGG TOPPING FOR
COFFEE
This delicious topping is
adapted from a small
cookbook called Recipes from
the Jewish Kitchens of
Curacao. A very similar coffee
topping made only with yolks
is enjoyed by Moroccan Jews.
The Jews of Curacao original-
ly used only yolks, but more
recently they have added
whites to make the topping
more fluffy. (Note: Because
this topping contains raw

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