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September 05, 1987 - Image 119

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MENS

Continued from Page 110

field and West Bloomfield states
that for the non-traditional Cole
Hann has produced a low
vamp lizard shoe for $550 in a
bunch of colors including
burgundy, grey, navy and
taupe.
The traditional wing tip shoe
with a lightened up sole is
shown for the businessman and
the long enduring tassled loafer
remains a favorite. Black and
cordovan are the main colors.
Suede shoes for business are
especially compatible with the
new tweeds.
"The boot, with a little higher
heel, is making a comeback,"
says Bishop. "Once again, it's
the Italian look with a little
tapered heel." These boots
generally cost $150 to $300
dollars.
For more casual footwear, an
updated version of deck shoes
in imitation alligator prints that
come in a wide variety of colors
is the newer look for the fall
season. Heavy ribbed soles are
also popular for casual city
wear.

TIE CARE
TIPS

I

f you get a water spot on a
silk tie, let it dry and rub it
briskly with a piece of the same
fabric. For tough-to-remove
spots, hold the spotted areas
over a boiling kettle's steam
spout. Then, apply cleaning
fluid.
Ties are dry cleanable and
many modern synthetics are
even washable. In dry cleaning,
be sure to select a laundry with
experience in handling ties.
Always hang your ties on a
rack. The only exception is knit-
ted and crochet ties, which
should be rolled and stored in a
drawer. Give your ties two or
three days rest between wear-
ings. This gives the wrinkles a
chance to hang out.

6245 Orchard Lake Road

West Bloomfield, MI 48322

(313) 851-0770

FALL '87 119

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