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July 03, 1987 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT I

OUR FAMOUS SPECIALS

INCLUDE TWO MUGS OF DRAFT BEER

91.95

BBQ Slat St. Louis Ribs for two

$ 7.95

BBQ Chicken for two

DINE-IN OR CARRY-OUT

GOOD ANYHOUR! ANYDAY!

Expires July 31, 1987

THE BRASS POINTE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 11 a.m.
24234 Orchard Lake Rd. at 10 Mile
476-1377

MELANIE'S ICE CREAM
AND SANDWICHES 626-2930

6393 FARMINGTON RD., JUST NORTH OF MAPLE •

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM

MADE ON OUR OWN PREMISES!

AND ALL DELI SANDWICHES & COLOMBO YOGURT

HOURS: SUN. THRU THURS. 10:30 to 11 • FRI. & SAT. 10:30 to 12 Mid.

----

COUPON -

50 0

---

OFF

QUART OF
OUR HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM

• 1 Coupon Per Quart
GOOD 7 DAYS A WEEK

JN

MAKE YOUR
4th OF JULY
BAR-B-Q
A BIG SUCCESS
WITH

MELANIE'S
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM

Restaurant

6066 W. MAPLE,

North of Orchard Lake Rd. •

VISIT OUR

851-0805

CARRY-OUT DEPT.

NEXT DOOR TO OUR FULL-SERVICE RESTAURANT

Featuring

• Pizza • Ribs • Greek Salads • Lasagna
• Chicken • Sandwiches • Etc.

OUTSIDE CATERING FOR
ALL OCCASIONS

FCOUPONT

$2 OFF DINNER FOR 2

SLAB OF RIBS

•GREEK SALAD

• BAG OF BREAD STICKS

CARRY-OUT LOCATION ONLY

Expires July 31, 1987

JN

coupoNi

=AM

BUY ONE PIZZA

GET 2ND SAME PIZZA

CARRY-OUT
LOCATION ONLY

48

FREE Expires

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 1987

Miniatures

Continued from preceding page

July 31, 1911

JN

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

by shop, place them in their
trunks, and hope that the jig-
gling of the automobile will
assemble the pieces by the
time they arrive home.
Although he will sometimes
buy kits to modify, he will
often spend weeks or months
doing the historical research
necessary to produce authen-
tically accurate miniature
soldiers, furniture, in-
struments, and, most recent-
ly, model ships.
"A miniature intrigues me
because it is a compact piece
of history," he says
thoughtfully. "Most of my
pieces require as much time
in research as they do in ac-
tual construction. I'm a very
curious person, and I've
learned that if you're in-
terested in something, you
dig for the information, and
you'll find it. It's the research
that fascinates me. When I
got interested in the British
occupation of India, I decided
to make an elephant
transporting a cannon. It took
three weeks to discover how
an elephant lays. Their legs
are double-jointed, but no one
really knew how I should
position them."
Right now Goldman is "in-
to ship models," which re-
quires spending time in
libraries, writing to the
Smithsonian Institute for
original plans, doing research
on the people who worked on
a particular ship, even
visiting the actual ship, if
possible. He and his wife,
Marlene, are planning a fall
trip to Mystic, Conn., to study
the "Morgan," the only sur-
viving whaling ship in this
country and Goldman's next
model project. An earlier
rigged ship took him nearly
eight months to build. It has
minute detail, such as pulleys
and ropes on a cannon, that
one cannot even see because
they're covered by other
items.
It all began with miniature
soldiers, says Goldman, and a
visit to the Dollhouse and Toy
Soldier Shop in Berkley in
the mid-1970's. The challenge
came in reproducing authen-
tic uniforms, "even down to
the color of the buttons."
Next came the dollhouse
furniture. "I was browsing in
the shop one day, looking to
see what soldiers were
already available, and I notic-
ed the miniature furniture.
And in my mind I said, 'I can
do that, and I can do that bet-
ter than what I've seen."'
Goldman went home and
took his camera and his tape
measure down to the Henry
Ford Museum to photograph
and make actual measure-
ments of several antique
pieces. A trip to the library

This violin and cello are examples of Goldman's work.

supplied him with more infor-
mation, and after a number of
hours in the basement of his
then Oak Park home,
Goldman had finished a few
items which he took back to
the shop in Berkley. "I left
them on consignment, and
when I opened the door at
home, the phone was ringing.
They had been sold. Would I
come back and sign and date
them?"
Perhaps Goldman is best
known as a craftsman of
miniature musical in-
struments. "After about a
year of making furniture, I
was curious about what items
were not available for
dollhouses. I found that no
one made musical in-
struments, and I went to the
violin-maker, Mr. Harrison,
in Berkley, and he showed me
how to make a violin."
Goldman "went commer-
cial" very quickly. He
estimates that he has sold
between 4,000 and 5,000
violins, along with several
thousand other instrumental
miniatures. His 13 different
items, which include a zither,
a banjo, and a harp, cost
about $20. "Even (President
Jimmy Carter's daughter)
Amy Carter has one of my
violins," he adds. They have
been shipped throughout the
world, sold in this country
primarily in New England
and California where, accor-
ding to Goldman, there is a
much greater interest in
miniature collecting.
"There's a man in California
who sells dollhouses for
$25,000 and up, and he has a
five-year waiting list. People
take out mortgages, and he
has started a miniature mor-
tgage company."
Goldman said he feels that
apartment living has
somewhat hampered his
work-style. His craftwork is
like "someone else's martini"
and provides him with a way
of unwinding after work.
When the couple had their

own home, "if things went
well, it was not unusual for
me to still be in the basement
working at three o'clock in
the morning. I can't do that
in the apartment because I
can't run my machinery at
that hour."
Goldman likes to work in
hard woods, mahogany and
particularly cherry. "I stay
away from the soft woods,
such as pine and balsa."
The tools of such a
meticulous trade are largely
of Goldman's own making
because some of the areas in
which he works are so small
that conventional craft tools
aren't suitable. Sometimes he
uses dental instruments as
well. He wears the double-
magnifying glasses that a
jeweler uses.
Goldman is the only one of
his family to pursue an in-
terest in crafts. He says his
wife has been working on two
afghans since they were mar-
ried 30 years ago. "But she
does knit a little," according
to Goldman. "When I first
saw the bulky knit sweaters
a few years ago, I thought I'd
make her one. I said, can do
that,' and she said, `Don't you
dare — I want to have
something that you don't
do.'" So, he turned to needle-
point. "I had a frame, and I
would watch television and
needlepoint, and that in-
terested me for a while."
Likewise, Goldman's two
grown children prefer to col-
lect their father's miniatures
rather than doing craftwork
themselves. Son Ross and his
wife live in Troy, and
daughter Lee has her home in
Novi.
A native of St. Paul,
Goldman went into the
Marine Corps after two years
of college. "It was during the
Korean 'Police Action,' and
when I got out, I didn't know
what I wanted to do. I'd ap-
prenticed as a motion picture
operator, but television was

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