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June 05, 1987 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

" SI NG IG UIIIP

ENTERTAINMENT

\

dining room, carry-out and trays

• breakfast • lunch • dinner
fter-theater • kiddie menu

fl

9126

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

968-0022

lincoln shopping center, 101/2 mile & greenfield, oak park

UR, Tax.,

..0.,

'.

2Inin9

-gine

44 0

A Tradition
, Since 1934

,um ,

and Codzig.lih

Fred Bayne at the organ nightly

111

1128 E. Nine Mile Road (1 1/2 Mile East of 1-75)

Recommended by AAA & Mobile Guides

(313) 541-2132

FUNG LI 'S

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN

Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. 12-10

;BANQUET FACIUTIES I
CARRY OUT • CATERING
• 5441021
8410 W. NINE MILE, W of Livernois

GOLDEN BOWL

Restaurant
22106 COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE In A & Iv Shopping Center
398-5502 or 398-5503
DINE IN & CARRY-OUT

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE

OPEN 1 DAYS-Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

• Banquet Facilities

r.17

A

.

..,

y L-1,19,

Your Chef: FRANK ENG

THE GOLD COIN

OPEN 7 DAYS — YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE
AND AMERICAN FOOD

if

COMPLETE
CARRY-OUT
AVAILABLE

24480 W. 10 MILE (IN TEL-EX PLAZA)

353-7848

West of Telegraph

THE GPEAT WW CC

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

I



PRIVATE DINING ROOM

BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS I

Your host ... HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry outs • Catering

35135 Grand River, Farmington
(Drakeshire Shopping Center)

476-9181

HOA KOW - INN

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30
— Carry-Out Service —

13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park

KING -LIM'S.GARDEN

Mandarin, Szechuan & Cantonese Food

26196 GREENFIELD, LINCOLN CENTER. OAK PARK

Mon.-Thurs. 11 to 10:30
Fri. 11 to 11, Sat. 11 to 12
Sun. 12 noon to 10

968-3040

OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW KING
LIM'S

'3305 Auburn Rd.

Carry - Out Service

832 8280

-

Exotic Cocktails

Catering To Parties Available

/

547-4663

FLOWN IN FRESH

EXPRESSLY FOR YOUR DINING

ENGLISH DOVER SOLE
KINGSLEY INN 642 0100
the

at

-

KOW KOW INN

• Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
OPEN Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m., Sun. & Holidays 12 Noon-12:30 a.m.

CARRY OUT SERVICE

EASY PARKING

322 W. McNichols Bet. Woodward & Second

56 Friday, June 5, 1987

868-7550

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Dateline: Detroit

Continued from preceding page

the Detroit Free Press, the
Detroit News, the Wall Street
Journal, listens to radio news

reports, watches her own
network and keeps a keen
eye on the competition.
Her work day begins at 9
a.m. when she meets with
her news directors and news
editors. She decides what
stories to include in that
day's show and then, sets to
work writing them. Margolis
regularly checks the news-
wires, reviews any pertinent
taped segments or reports
and, perhaps, squeezes in
some preparation for an
interview segment. By then,
the morning is gone and it's
almost time to go on the air.
After the noon newscast
ends, Margolis checks in with
the newsroom to get her af-
ternoon assignment. This
might involve taping of a re-
port for future use, hitting
the streets in order to be on
the scene of a news story, or
working several days in suc-
cession on a special series,
such as her in-depth studies,
last year, of sexual harass-
ment and caring for elderly
parents. Time must be allo-
cated, later in the day, to
write her piece and then, go
over it with the editor — and
by 5 p.m., get into editing so
that her report is ready to air
on the 6 p.m. news. Some-
times, there are phone calls
to be taken, and occasionally,
these result in good' inter-
views.
Margolis, who grew up in
Buffalo, has always been in-
volved in communications of
some sort. She edited her
high school newspaper and
wrote for her college paper,
later working as editorial
assistant for Buffalo Spree
Magazine, a quarterly city
publication. During her years
in Buffalo, various jobs in-
cluded waitressing, clerking
in a department store, teach-
ing religious school, advising
a United Synagogue Youth
group, teaching dramatics to
children, and working as a
public relations intern for the
Buffalo Jewish Federation.
Attending State University
of New York in Buffalo, Mar-
golis majored in English lit-
erature and minored in thea-
ter. She acted in plays, di-
rected productions, including
musicals, and predicts that
she will always pursue drama
as a hobby. Margolis has, in
fact, appeared in several
television dramas, among
them The Last Embrace with
Roy Scheider, shot in Niag-
ara Falls; Skeleton Key, a TV
movie made in Buffalo; Vam-
ping, a Patrick Duffy movie;
and most recently, as an
extra in I'll Take Manhattan,
the CBS mini-series filmed in
Toronto.
Margolis' extensive media
experience encompasses an
impressive number of posi-
tions, beginning with Buf-

falo's Channel 29, an inde-
pendent television station,
where she created, hosted
and produced a children's
morning show. At about this
time, she entered the Univer-
sity of Buffalo, in pursuit of a
graduate degree in communi-
cations. She was sub-
sequently awarded a
graduate assistantship, which
entailed teaching two under-
graduate classes. For a brief
time, Margolis was a substi-
tute weathercaster on NBC's
WGR-TV, moving on with
her career as a newscaster to
Buffalo's top radio station, a
position she retained for 2Y2
years.
In the midst of all these re-
sponsibilities, there was also.
a stint as a broadcasting
intern at ABC's Channel 7,
again, working in the news-
room. This was all a prologue
to Margolis' three years a
WKBW-TV, after which De-
troit's TV2 invited her to join
its team.
Margolis loves Detroit and
its Jewish community. After
Buffalo, with a population of
18,000 Jews, she says, "Corn-
ing to Detroit was like being
a kid in a candy store!" She
remains impressed with the
activity and closeness of the
Jewish community here.
Discussing how her Jewish
identity relates to her career,
Margolis comments on the
fact that Jews seem to be un-
derrepresented in Detroit
media. As an individual, she
notes, "I never hide my faith.
I never hide my Jewishness,
because it's part of who I
am."
"The challenge," she con-
tinues, "for me, is being
Jewish and reporting on the
other side," as was recently
the case when she investi-
gated local anti-Arab senti-
ment. "I'm called on, every
day, to be impartial, unbiased
... that's my job."
On the other hand, she as-
serts, "As far as opinions —
you have to be careful. I'm
not paid to give an opinion,
but to tell my audience the
facts." Often, Margolis comes
away from a tough assign-
ment — one in which her
personal values are brought
into conflict — with a better
perception of what her job
really is. She has learned to
carefully weigh both sides of
every issue.
Margolis encourages De-
troiters to take advantage of
the fact that radio and televi-
sion stations are receptive to
their audiences. She urges
people to call their stations to
issue complaints, suggestions
or plaudits. She enjoys re-
porting on stories that stimu-
late her viewers to be less
passive and complacent, more
aware and protective of their
rights.
For her own rest and rela-
xation, Margolis might read
or even re-read an old

English novel, or rev up with
a long, exhilirating run.
When her rare free time
allows, she tunes her own
television to 60 Minutes,

20-20, Cheers, St. Elsewhere,
Cagney and Lacey — the lat-

ter three of which she prefers
for their realistic -Portrayal of
people.
Much of Margolis' energy,
however, goes into the nur-
turing of a long-distance rela-
tionship with Jeffrey Zaslow,
staff writer for the Wall
Street Journal, which will
culminate in a summer wed-
ding. The couple plans to stay
in Detroit.
Margolis loves being where
she is, doing what she's do-
ing. - She communicates her
delight when she tells you,
"As soon as I came to Detroit,
I had a good feeling about it.
I got a Jewish News and
started looking for a room-
mate. The person I contacted
became a friend, and so it be-
gan. So many nice people!"



Golf Invitational
Aids Alzheimer's

Grace and Wild Studios will
sponsor their third annual
charity golf invitational to
benefit the Alzheimer's Disease
and Related Disorders Associa-
tion on June 12 at the Bay
Pointe Golf Club in West
Bloomfield. The-off times begin
at 7:45 a.m. and extend
through the afternoon.
The fee includes 18 holes of
golf, breakfast, lunch, open bar,
dinner, cocktails, carts and
greens fees.
The fee is tax deductible.
Reservations are limited to the
first 130 players. To register,
call Mary Benjamin, 471-6010.

Theater School
Season To Begin

The Cranbrook Theater
School will begin its 46th
season for students in grades
three through college beginn-
ing June 22 at 9:30 a.m.
The format includes: acting
techniques development; im-
provisation; diction and voice;
makeup; and stage movement
through dance.
For enrollment information,
call Cranbrook Schools,
644-9065 or 645-3678.

Arts Festival

Southfield will celebrate the
visual and performing arts this
weekend at Arts Festival '87.
The three-day event at the
Southfield Civic Center will
feature fine art, ethnic food
booths, live non-stop entertain-
ment, children's art activities
and much more.

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