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May 08, 1987 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-FENBY-STEIN

553-9966

CAPITOL REPORT

Talent Agency

WOLF BLITZER

WE'RE PLAYING YOUR SONG!

JERRY FENBY
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RENDEZVOUS
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ROMANCE
MIRAGE
NANCY & COMPANY
THE RITZ
WILMOT
RARE BLEND

FENBY-CARR
SHELBY LEE
ERIC FREUDIGMAN
CARL RYDING
GEORGE BENSON JAZZ
AUSTIN-MORO BIG BAND
BOB DURANT BIG BAND
SOIREE-FLUTE/GUITAR
CLASSIC TOUCH
ASSOCIATES IN SOUND
JAY VALLE
SPECIAL AFFECTS

Before
there was Israel,
there was
Hadassah.

A young, growing country is like a
young, growing child. You keep thinking it
will get easy, but problems crop up and
needs multiply.
For 75 years, Hadassah has been there
to meet those needs. It's hard to picture a
healthy Israel without thinking of Hadas-
sah. Now the hand that helps needs a little
help, too.
This Max', when your ballot arrives,
.
remember to be there for Hadassah. Vote
the Hadassah slate and send the strength

ERIC HARRIS, D.J.
GOLD TONES, D.J.
RED GARTER BAND
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MARIACHI BAND
GAMUT 50'S BAND
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of women to the 31st World Zionist Con-
gress in Jerusalem in December.
We need a strong delegation so we
can fight for all the things you believe in,
independent of any political factions. The
stronger our delegation, the stronger our
voice for religious pluralism, Jewish edu-
cation, Jewish youth programs and free-
dom for oppressed Jews everywhere.
So vote Hadassah slate #2 as soon as
your ballot arrives. More than Iladassalis
future depends on it.

Vote
Hadassah
slate # 2

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38

Friday, May 8, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Another Chance At Peace
In Mideast May Be Lost

W

ashington — Yet
another missed op-
portunity for moving
toward Arab-Israeli peace
seems likely right now.
Historically, there have been
a series of such missed oppor-
tunities over the years. But
this one seems especially
tragic because a more favor-
able overall climate toward
Israel certainly appears to ex-
ist in much of the region.
In various parts of the
Arab world — well beyond
Egypt — there is a grudging
acceptance that Israel has in-
deed become a fundamental
fact of life in the Middle East.
Moderate Arabs are willing to
seriously consider entering
into peace agreements with
Israel.
Arabs have come to respect
Israel's military strength.
They also have come to view
the U.S. connection to Israel
as incredibly solid — one that
will not be broken by the
Arabs and their supporters.
Arab extremists, of course,
continue to hold out for a
vision of the Middle East
with no Israel. But they are
now seen as a distinct minor-
ity.
King Hassan II of Moroc-
co openly welcomed then-
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
to his country last year, and
more Israeli-Moroccan dis-
cussions are expected, es-
pecially following Hassan's
decision to sever ties with the
PLO.
Egypt, despite its nine-year
old peace treaty with Israel,
is no longer totally isolated in
the Arab world.
There is a real prospect of
discreet discussions between
Israeli and Tunisian officials.
The Director-General of the
Israeli Foreign Ministry,
Avraham Pamir, was recently
due to meet with the Tunisian
Ambassador at the United
Nations until word of that
session leaked out.
Iraq's position, while not
moderate, has still softened
considerably in recent years,
particularly as it has sought
to stave off Iranian military
advances. Even Saudi Arabia,
through billionaire Adnan
Khashoggi and a few other
special envoys, has informed
Israel of a readiness to coex-
ist.
As for the Palestinians
living under Israeli military
occupation on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip, they would
no doubt welcome a decision
by the PLO to accept the
minimal conditions necessary
for U.S., and perhaps even

Israeli, recognition — name-
ly the acceptance of UN
Security Council Resolution
242. The PLO would then
presumably be in a position
to sit down at the bargaining
table.
But the PLO has opted for
short-term unity among its
various factions rather than
political courage and wisdom
necessary to genuinely help
the Palestinians themselves.
The real losers are the
Palestinians.
The Soviet Union, for its
part, has embarked on an ap-
parent course of improving
relations with Israel, albeit
slowly and cautiously.
In Jordan, top government
officials speak candidly and
openly of their desire to reach
some sort of peaceful settle-

"If the interna-
tional conference
doesn't take place
this year, it
will be extremely
difficult" to hold
it next year,
Jordan's Foreign
Minister said.

ment with Israel. The Jordan-
ians want an international
conference to convene this
year, before next year's U.S.
presidential and congres-
sionial elections come to
preoccupy America's think-
ing. "If the international
conference doesn't take place
this year, it will be extremely
difficult that it will take place
next year for many reasons,"
said Jordan's Foreign Min-
ister, Taber al-Masri, during
an interview in Amman.
The Jordanians insist that
the moment has never been
better for direct Arab-Israeli
peace talks, despite the latest
decisions taken by the PLO in
Algiers. They are prepared to
swallow those PLO decisions
and not make a major fuss
over them, provided that an
international meeting can get
off the ground. PLO Chair-
man Yasser Arafat, the Jor-
danians insist, can still be
brought into line.
That may be an overly op-
timistic opinion, but the Jor-
danians are challenging Israel
to test the waters for peace.
King Hussein, for his part,
has been secretly meeting

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