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February 20, 1987 - Image 72

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ON CAMPUS

of &loom/told Hills

For those who
want the finest custom
furniture at...
AFFORDABLE PRICES

The simplest cube to the most
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specifications by meticulous craftsmen.

)i( Selections for every room in your
home or office in fine woods, laminates,
marble, glass and specializing in...
OUTSTANDING LUCITE DESIGNS

Otzma Is Recruiting
For Year In Israel

Creative
Designs In
Custom
Closets

Call Kathleen Park
at 473-6800

S

DIVORCE

is the last step

Don't speculate.
The emotional and financial benefits
of knowing the facts are too important.

AARAGON INVESTIGATION AGENCY

Specialists in domestic investigation
25 W. Long Lake Rd., Suite 201, Bloomfield Hills

646-2090

• a discreet and confidential approach •

CELEBRATING MICHIGAN'S
150th BIRTHDAY

Come to one of northern
Michigan s finest summer
camps.

FOR MORE
INFORMATION
PLEASE CALL:

ALL PHONE NUMBERS IN 313 AREA

72

Friday, February 20, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

College students age 18-24
may be eligible for Otzma II, a
year of study and work in Is-
rael.
Project Otzma, the Jewish
Service Corps, provides par-
ticipants with an opportunity
to learn about Israel's history,
language, culture and lifes-
tyle. At the same time, it
deepens their understanding
through contact with peers and
"adoption" by selected Israeli
families.
Recruitment for the pro-
gram's second year officially
began this winter when Jewish
Welfare Federation represen-
tatives started interviewing
Otzma hopefuls.
The new program starts with
a national orientation, Aug.
21-25 in New York. From
there, the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration hopes to send 15
Michigan students to Israel.
Otzma participants will
spend their first three months
on a kibbutz and divide their
time between intensive lan-
guage study (ulpan), work and
integration into the social and
cultural life of the kibbutz.
They will also work at Youth
Aliyah villages, where the vol-
unteers will tutor and work
with the residents.
Based on positive feedback
from this year's participants,
Otzma has expanded the
period of service in Youth
Aliyah villages from three to
eight weeks.
Another extra is the possibil-
ity that next year's students
may be able to earn up to eight
college credits for their work
on the ulpari. Negotiations are
under way with Haifa Univer-
sity.
In addition, arrangements
have been made for those who
would like to spend extra time
in Israel once the program ends
through an independent track
program.
What sets Otzma apart from
other student programs is the
adoptive family set-up. The
group has made close ties with
their Israeli brothers and sis-
ters. "I continue to be im-
pressed with the program's
quality, and with the people
responsible for putting things
together," said Eric Berman, a
participant from the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
Their remaining five months
will be devoted to public serv-
ice in a Project Renewal
neighborhood. The seven par-
ticipants from Michigan will
go to Rainla, Detroit's sister
city.
The 56 young men and
women on this year's trip re-
present a diverse cross-section
of contemporary North Ameri-
can Jewry. This is one of the
program's strengths as par-
ticipants learn from each

other's experiences and in-
sights.
Under the auspices of the
Jewish Welfare Federation,
Otzma is funded in part by
United Jewish Charities and
the Jewish Agency for Israel.
Its objective is to identify
gifted young leaders, at an
early point in their career, and
then familiarize them with Is-
rael and the Jewish commu-
nity in a way that will stimu-
late them to become Jewish
communal professionals or
active volunteer leaders.
In all, the volunteers will
live, learn and work in virtu-
ally every part of Israel. They
will also have the opportunity
to visit with leading Israeli
educators, scientists and
authors.
For information on Project
Otzma, contact Ken Mintzer at
Federation, 965-3939.

Max Kapustin
Symposium Due

Rabbi Max Kapustin

The second annual Max
Kapustin Memorial Sym-
posium will take place March 2
at Manoogian Hall at Wayne
State University and at Adat
Shalom Synagogue.
At 3:30 p.m. that day at
Manoogian Hall Prog. Peter
Machinist will present a lec-
ture on "New Trends in Bibli-
cal Criticism." At 8 p.m. that
day at Adat Shalom, Prof. Zvi
Abush will present a lecture on
"From Creation to
Abraham—The Shaping of the
Biblical Universe."
The public is welcome, free of
charge, to both lectures.
Rabbi Kapustin was the di-
rector of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at WSU from 1948
to 1976. •
Machinist is professor of Bi-
blical and ancient Near East-
ern studies at the University of
Michigan. Abush is a professor
in the department of Near
Eastern and Judaic studies at
Brandeis University.

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