100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 02, 1987 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-01-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

dining room, carry-out and trays

• breakfast • lunch • dinner
after-theater • kiddie menu

BfIS

grEA

BEST OF EVERYTHING

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

lincoln shopping center, 10 1 /2 mile & greenfield, oak park

DANNY RASKIN

968-0022

., 44 auott . s

v.

,

A inT c ra e dlit 9 io 3n 4

Tim

-gine

,

2inin9 and (..::ocle1,414

Fred Bayne at the organ nightly

1128 E. Nine Mile Road (1 1 /2 Mile East of 1-75))

Recommended by MA & Mobile Guides



(313) 541-2132

FUNG- LI

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN

Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. 12-10

CARRY OUT • CATERING
IBANQUET FACIUTIES1
8410 W. NINE MILE, W of Livernois
5444021

GOLDEN BOWL

Restaurant

22106 COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE In A & P Shopping Center

DINE IN & CARRY OUT
398-5502 or 398-5503
SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE

-

/

OPEN 1 DAYS—Mon.-Tliors. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
• Banquet Facilities
Your Chef: FRANK ENG

„,,

a--
.V,

THE GOLD
COIN.


.:\

:

A•

• : = A

OPEN 7 DAYS
YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW
SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE
AND AMERICAN FOOD

*.

COMPLETE
CARRY-OU _
AVAILABLE

24480 W. 10 MILE pt1 TEL-EX PLAZA)

West of Telegraph

353-7848

TNE GrEAT WACC.

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

I



PRIVATE DINING ROOM

BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS

I

Your host . . . HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry outs • Catering

35135 Grand River, Farmington
(Drakeshire Shopping Center)

476-9181

HOA KOW INN

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30

— Carry-Out Service —
13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park

KING LIM'S GARDEN_

Mandarin, Szechuan & Cantonese Food

26196 GREENFIELD, LINCOLN CENTER, OAK PARK

968-3040

Mon.-Thurs. 11 to 10:30
Fri. 11 to 11, Sat. 11 to 12
Sun. 12 noon to 10

OPEANdERYS

NEW KING
LIM'S

3305 Auburn Rd.

Carry - Out Service
Catering To Parties Available

/

547-4663

852 8280

-

Exotic Cocktails

FLOWN IN FRESH

EXPRESSLY FOR YOUR DINING

at
the

ENGLISH DOVER SOLE
KINGSLEY INN 642-0100

KOW KOW INN

• Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
OPEN Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m.. Sun. & Holidays 12 Noon-12:30 a.m .

CARRY OUT SERVICE

EASY PARKING

322 W. McNichols Bet. Woodward & Second

68

Friday, January 2, 1987

868-7550

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

.

THE
MYSTERY
MUNCHER writes . . . "More

a never-never land than a res-
taurant, the glitzy, glittery,
glamorous Potomac was
launched in August on a beau-
tiful bend of the Potomac River
in Washington, D.C.
"The three-story dining
room, from the man who
brought the elegant Maxwell
Plum to New York City, is lit
by 800,000 bulbs shining
through swirls of colored glass
jewels. Just visualize 24 crys-
tal chandeliers, 110 crystal
sconces, a brass model train
rumbling along the edge of the
balcony and 50 jardinieres
stuffed with armloads of bright
blossoms.
"Visiting Potomac is like
attending a magnificent wed-
ding without knowing the
bride or groom. It's a rare show
right down to the floral china
and matching tablecloths. The
menu demands a guide who is
familiar with the territory.
"Appetizers include avocado
with raw tuna and Japanese
vinaigrette at $7.75, mosaic of
bass and salmon with spicy
sauce at $8.75 and a shrimp
cocktail with remoulade and
sherry wine sauce for a whop-
ping $10.95.
"The soups, shell crab, gaz-
pacho and onion, have more
character than the average.
Main courses range from $23
for lobster with sizzling ginger
butter and deep fried spinach
to redfish at $15.75. But at any
price, the food is really nothing
to rave about.
"If you want lighter fare, you
can order duckling salad or
lobster and artichoke salad
with a variety of fruits and
vegetables. Also available are
hamburgers, steak sandwiches
and club sandwiches.
"More impressive are pas-
tries such as chocolate pecan
passion, New York cheesecake
and chocolate and praline
mousse cake. But even if you
just order a drink, don't leave
Washington without seeing
the greatest show in the
capitol.
"Coming back down to earth,
we were disappointed with our
dinner at Aldo's on Kelly near
East Seven Mile. The atmos-
phere is Italian down to the
piped-in Mario Lanza
melodies. But we expected the
food to be an outstanding ver-
sion of "that's Italian” and
we've had much better.
"The minestrone is more a
thick vegetable stew and it's
filling. The salad, usually a
treat in Italian restaurants, is
a boring combination of let-
tuce, tomatoes and little else.
The dressing is oil and vinegar
without the spice. We missed
the antipasto which is served
at Lelli's and was a favorite at
Larco's. We might not have or-
dered the specialty of the
house, but nobody was thrilled
with the pasta or the veal. The
waitress was pleasant, the
service leisurely and the at-
mosphere relaxing. P.S. — Al-
do's doesn't take credit cards.

"Maybe you'll think twice
next time you fail to keep a
reservation at a busy dining
spot. At Golden Mushroom, at
least, a computer software
package designed for the posh
Southfield restaurant keeps
track of no-shows and late can-
celers and is expected to save
the dining spot thousands of
dollars a year in lost revenues.
Says Reid Ashton, Mushroom
owner, "Like hotel space, res-
taurant reservations are
perishable and can't be resold
to somebody else."
"Ashton figures losses of
more than $13,000 a year in
no-shows. He's considering
marketing the software to
other restaurants and says the
system could pay for itself in a
year. Ashton says he'll reward
loyal, considerate customers
with a bottle of wine or a
thank-you note. But no-shows
and late-cancelers will be
warned when they try again
and if they don't mend their
ways, they'll be advised the
restaurant is booked.
"It seems odd that so many
Detroit restaurants are dark
on Sunday nights when a lot of
women aren't in the mood to
cook and the men are too re-
laxed after watching a football
game to argue. Maybe Sunday
is family night and the more
expensive, couple-oriented
places figure it doesn't pay to
stay open.
"We recently drove to three
dining spots on a Sunday night
only to find them all closed. We
finally landed at
Meriweather's, on Telegraph
and Ten Mile which was open
for business but not very brisk.
We were happy with our choice
and the sea food in the restau-
rant, now owned by the inimit-
able Chuck Muer, is fresh, var-
ied and deliciously prepared.
Southfield Charley's, another
Muer success, also is open
Sundays and the food keeps
getting better.
"Metropolitan Detroit re-
cently listed its restaurant
awards with a check list for
reader' opinions. We've only
been to one nominee for best
breakfast and that's Original
Pancake House. Must admit
we've never munched in the
best Sunday brunch spots
nominated.
"For best steakhouse, Haab's
in Ypsilanti, Stuart Ander-
son's American Grill and
Carl's Chop House we're famil-
iar with. Waxing nostalgic, we
can't forget the old Cliff Bell's
and Mayfield chop houses of
yore where the steaks were
first class. And what about
Driscol's?
"Best seafood nominees Ben-
jie's and Joe Muer's we've
tried.
"Now for the winners, ac-
cording to Metropolitan De-
troit. Original Pancake House
in Grosse Pointe Woods and in
Southfield is the runaway
favorite for its from-scratch
waffles and pancakes,
homemade sausage and the

sinful baked concoction, the
Big Apple.
For best Sunday brunch,
says Metropolitan, nothing
comes close to Park Terrace in
the Windsor Hilton Interna-
tional Hotel. The Summit in
the Westin Hotel, Renaissance
Center, is the magazine's favo-
rite for steaks thick, tender
and juicy and mesquite-grilled.
"We don't agree that Benjie's
on Orchard Lake dishes up the <
best seafood. True, the restau-
rant has an enormous variety
of fresh fish. But Joe Muer's
has always been our favorite.
"The best service is at the
Caucus Club on Congress, ac-
cording to the magazine, be-
cause of the gentility and
savvy of waiters and the
graciousness of the hostess, all
billed as class acts.
"Predictably, Ponchartrain
Wine Cellars on Larned is
named the most romantic spot,
the London Chop House on
Congress the best scene to see
and be seen, and the Van Dyke
Place the prettiest interior.
"One of our own winners ist=(
Szechuan Garden on Maple
near Coolidge in Troy. Try the
fried dumplings with meat for
an appetizer, a nice change
from egg roll. Whether you like
your Oriental food on the spicy
side or you can't handle it,
you'll find an unusual dish of
seafood or chicken with a
different flavor. The menu is so
varied, it'll take a while to de-
cide. But whatever you choose,
you're bound to enjoy it.
"Confetti's on Orchard Lake
Road in West Bloomfield is
bright and airy and the colorful
neon lights add to the striking
design of the restaurant. The
dining spot touts its freshly
made pasta but after sampling
pasta salad, fish and a vegeta-
ble dish at this trendy eatery,
we were unimpressed. As often
is the case, we may have or- j
dered the wrong thing but our
meal was forgettable and ditto
the service.
"Unless L.J. Loophole's in
the Southfield Hilton has done
some serious revamping of its
menu, that's another place cus-
tomers seem to stay away from
in droves. We're not super crit-
ical, but having been served
three-day-old shrimp and
salami in an unedible an-
tipasto, we're not anxious for a
repeat.
"Out Rochester way,
Cooper's Arms offers a fine din 7,
ing experience with the accent
on seafood, steaks, veal and
poultry. With the help of Oak-
land University, the restau-
rant has developed a section of
the menu for the health and
diet conscious.
"We recommend the lemon
chicken, broiled bay scallops,
shrimp sauteed scampi and
New York strip.
"Also in Rochester, we
enjoyed the nautical atmos-
phere of Scallops and the menu
with a section devoted entirely _/
to scallops, shrimp, lobster and
crab.
"Duffy's on the Lake offers a

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan