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January 02, 1987 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-01-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[Don't be a i
heartbreaker

LAWRENCE D. CASTLEMAN, M.D.
MARTIN I. APPLE, M.D.

FEELING GOOD

0

Sports Medicine

eaJliEman E E eEntET

CATARACT, LASER AND IMPLANT SURGERY
MYOPIA SURGERY

25811 West 12 Mile Rd
Southfield. MI 48034
358-3937

Continued from Page 55

Stop
smoking.

American Heart

14050 Dix-Toledo Rd
Southgate MI 48195
283-0500

Associati on

.

WERE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE

13740
W. 9 Mile

Next to
Oak Park
Post Office

Along with on-site services
for both athletes and non-
athletes, sports medicine cen-
ters also offer a variety of off-
site programs to various
groups, through public educa-
tion clinics, some of which are
free-of-charge.
"We speak at and go to area
high schools on a regular basis,
talking with coaches and par-
ents about school athletic pro-
grams," says Jack Moores, a
certified athletic trainer who is
Program Director of the Sports
Medicine Center at Riverside
and at Detroit Osteopathic
Hospital. "I'd say we do about
100 clinics per year. We also
send out newsletters on pre-.
ventive injury techniques to all

Detroit and Highland Park
coaches."

According to Stachurski,
many of the requests received
at MedSport for these off-site
services come from corpora-
tions, increasingly interested
in providing more fitness edu-
cation for employees.
He adds that MedSport also
often receives requests from
different athletic groups in the
area, asking staff members to
come out and talk to the groups
about conditioning, or how cer-
tain common injuries might be
avoided.
"Right now," he says, "we're
hearing mostly from
skiers." ❑

DO'S AND DON'TS

Medicare and most insurance plans
accepted as payment in full.

DANIEL S. LAZAR, D.P.M. 548-6633

BODYINC.

114

EXERCISE COMPANY

LAURA ROBERTS - BECKI COLE

FORMERLY OF THE WORKOUT CO

MEN

BEGINNER

WOMEN

INTERMEDIATE

TEENS

ADVANCED

KIDS

NON-IMPACT

BODY IS THE PLACE TO BE!

Sugar Tree

Orchard Lake Rd.
Just North of Maple
West Bloomfield

58

Friday, January 2, 1987

626-1350

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Nearly everyone, at some
point; experiences sleepless-
ness. And, say the experts,
there are a number of steps
you should — and should
not — take to ensure a good
night's sleep. Among them:
Don't go to bed hungry.
Should you wake in the mid-
dle of the night, craving food,
you'll find it hard to go back
to sleep. Resist the impulse to
raid the pantry. "The cookies
you gobble will soon become
your nightly reward for wak-
ing up," says Dr. Samuel
Dunkell, director of the New
York Hospital-Cordell Medi-
cal Center's Insoninia Clinic.
Do grab a snack before bed-
time, preferably protein-rich,
as the body converts an
amino acid called L-
tryptophan into serotonin, a
sleep-inducing brain
chemical. (If you're a weight-
watcher, skip the snack and
swallow a couple of L-
tryptophan capsules available
at most health food stores.)
Don't go in for late night
smokes and nightcaps, not
even a "harmless" Coke or
cup of cocoa. Alcohol in-
terfers with the stages of
quality sleep, while nicotine
and caffeine stimulate the
nervous system. Nicotine in-
creases the system's produc-
tion of a sleep-disturbing
chemical called catechol-
amine. Caffeine reaches peak
blood concentration within an
hour but takes at least three
hours to lose half of its
effects.
Do your exercises, but not
before you go to bed. Fifty-six
percent of people who don't
exercise report sleep dif-
ficulties at least once a week.
Thirty minutes three times a
week between 4 and 8 p.m. is
all you need; if you can't spare
the time, plan to take a brisk
15-minute hike after dinner.
Don't try and force sleep. It
doesn't work but only leads to
frustration and anger. If you
think you're too hyped up to

fall asleep, take a shower or
hot bath with epsom salts: it
will relax your muscles, make
you drowsy. If that doesn't
work, try counting sheep or,
if you're right-handed, im-
agine drawing a large circle
counter-clockwise. If you're a
leftie, clockwise. You'll soon
bore yourself to sleep.
Here are some other things
the sleep experts recommend:
Skip the catnap or siesta
unless you're a nightperson
and go to sleep late. If you
must nap, try to keep it under
15 minutes, and in mid-after-
noon. But beware: a nap may
"restore your batteries," but
it could also confuse your own
biological clock enough to
upset established sleep/wake
patterns.
Avoid decongestants with
caffeine if you have sinus
problems. If they're serious,
and your bedmate doesn't ob-
ject, do what the painter Vin-
cent van Gogh did to conquer
his insomnia — plant some
camphor in your pillowcase.
Equally desperate measures
may be called for in dealing
with snores. If nudging your
partner into changing posi-
tions doesn't work, sew a
pocket in back of the night-
gown, pajamas or shorts and
put a marble in it.
Be wary of prescription or
over-the-counter tranquil-
izers— without first undergo-
ing a complete physical.
Although it's harder now to
get hold of barbiturates such
as Seconal and Nembutol,
there seems to be no slow-
down in the sale of Dalmane
and Valium. They are both ad-
dictive and lethal, if taken
with alcohol. If you must take
pills, ask for something in the
benzodiazepine family of hyp-
notics that move out of the
blood stream much faster.
Lower the bedroom temper-
ature to between 55 and 65
degrees Fahrenheit. If you're
too hot or too cold sleep will
pass you by. Also, install a

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