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December 19, 1986 - Image 93

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

would be brought up before
we married.
"Even though they are
Baptists, they were exposed
to both and later on down the
road, they may decide that's
not for them. They might de-
cide to celebrate their own
whether its Jewish or non-
Jewish customs."
David Bango, 12, lives in
Oak Park with his mother,
Karen, 39. David usually
spends Christmas vacation
with his father.
"I sort of feel relaxed in
celebrating both because
neither of my parents puts
any pressure on me to believe
more in one religion or the
other. Even though I'm
attending class at JPI
(Jewish Parents Institute),
they don't really put pressure
on me to share a total belief
or religion.
"What I used to say before
I was thinking about what
religion I was going to prac-
tice was that my mother is
Jewish and my father is
Catholic. But now I say that
I'm Jewish.
"When we go to my grand-
parents house at Passover,
it's not outwardly religious.
But we do keep the Passover.
When we go to my dad's par-
ents, its not that religious
either. They're not really
thinking of Christ, it's just a
time for the family to be to-
gether. Since I've been young
and going over there, the
only thing I really remember
about Easter was that there
was an egg hunt and little
baskets with chocolate in
them. I didn't really think of
-anything different than that.
It wasn't really religious, just
sort of a party.
"When we first told my
father that I was taking a
class at JPI, he didn't really
show that he had any feel-
ings about it. He said that it
was all right and that he
didn't have any bad feelings
toward it. But when I talked
to him about doing this
interview, he said he felt a
little bit sorry that I didn't
have any Christian schooling.
He said that he would have
liked for me to have been a
little bit more informed about
it."
Stan Silverman, 40, has
been divorced for five-years.
He has a daughter, Marta,
who is now 18 years old.
"What we do is have a
Christmas tree and we do
decorate the house for
Christmas. It's more of a sec-
ular holiday than a religious
holiday. We'll do some of the
observances of Chanukah just
from the standpoint of get-
ting a feeling of the history,
more than anything else.
"If you look at how
Chanukah has been bastar-
dized over the years, it's been
made into a Jewish Christ-
mas. It's lost a lot of it's reli-
gious background. They seem
to have blended together over
the years.

"Since it's the wife's reli-
gion that governs, Marta was
raised with a non-specific
religious background. She
was raised with a little bit of
Judaism and a little bit of
Christianity. So she really
had an opportunity to look at
them both. I think at this
point in her life, as far as
religion, she would probably
say that she had none."
Silverman pointed out that
when the family was living
in Southfield, they celebrated
predominantly Jewish holi-
days. When they moved to
Rochester, they celebrated all
the holidays partly because
they felt that for Marta,
"there was a lot of confusion
as to why everybody else in
the city was celebrating
Christmas and not us.
"She's had the opportunity
to look at both religions and
she'll practice what she
wants to. I get the feeling
from my daughter that what
she'll end up doing from a
religious perspective is what-
ever the religion of her hus-
band, that's the religion she
will be."

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CALENDAR

COMMUNITY NETWORK
FOR JEWISH SINGLES
(25-45): Strike and Spare
Lanes, Birmingham drop-
in bowling, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday; admission, 477-
2786.

COMMUNITY NETWORK
FOR JEWISH SINGLES
(25-45): Brace Lederle
Field, Southfield, drop-in,
co-ed football, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday, free.
COMMUNITY NETWORK
FOR JEWISH SINGLES
(25-45): Main Jewish Cen-
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day, beginner; 8 p.m.
Thursday, advanced, ad-
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347.

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Sunday, admission, 968-
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West Bloomfield, Las
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Saturday, admission,
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93

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