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November 28, 1986 - Image 125

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

pliant. These are the traits
we must develop in order to
survive these frightful times.
"When you teach poetry,
you tend to meet the kinds of
students who have these
traits and it's inspiring,
really. People say that all the
college kids of today vote for
Reagan and go out and buy
Buicks. That's just not so.
The students in my poetry
classes are full of wonder-
ment. And they have the
commitment to language and
to exploring life that is pow-
erful and honest."
For poet Philip Levine, to
draw on his Detroit roots is
to draw on a vision of
America still struggling to
emerge. ❑

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New York — Applications
for grants under the JWB
scholarship program are
being accepted through Feb.
1. Called "Career With A
Cause," the program provides
scholarships for students
seeking master's degrees in
social work, Jewish com-
munal studies, physical edu-
cation, early childhood educa-
tion or cultural arts.
One scholarship each year
is awarded to a student who
intends to make aliyah and
will carry out the two-year
work obligation in Israel.
Material submitted by all
applicants is expected to re-
flect a commitment to the
primary goal of the
worldwide Center movement:
the enhancement of the qual-
ity of Jewish life.

(t)


octav
o.
..
1 a w
ith
.

JWB Offers
Scholarships

Service of This Newspaper
Council
M - 8 A The Public Advertising

V

Jerusalem (JTA) — Doctors
treating leukemia victim
Michael Shirman said last
week that he has only a 10 to
15 percent chance of survival,
even with a bone marrow
transplant from his sister, In-
essa Flerova, because his con-
dition has deteriorated
seriously in the past 11
months.
They said that if Flerova
had been given permission to
leave the USSR last Feb-
ruary, when she first re-
quested it, his chances would
have been as high as 50 per-
cent. Flerova arrived in Israel
with her family last week.
The prognosis was all the
more painful because tests
showed that Flerova's tissues
are entirely compatible with
her brother's. The test results
were announced by Dr. Haim
Braubar of Hadash Medical
Center here, where the tests
were made. Shiaman was
hospitalized several days ago
at Kaplan Hospital in Re-
hovot.

Well Help.
Will You?

a • P

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For Israeli
Cancer Victim

833-4440

American
Red Cross

Aarimice.-fr imarirr)., •• AbillUMW/A AW/AVIIIIA 4:1 A • •Noldr•

said. "I don't think America
has changed a whole lot since
I was a kid in Detroit. When
I was young, there was an
awful lot of racism around,
an extraordinary amount of
racism. In the 1930s, you
could turn on the radio and
listen to Father Coughlin's
anti-Semitic broadcasts cal-
ling for the death of the
Jews. There seems to be a lot
of racism around still. And in
Detroit especially, you can
still see the scars. There are
rows and rows of burned-out
shells of buildings left over
from the riots.
"There are so many lives
that are used and thrown
away by our government
which has amassed immense
political, economic and mili-
tary power and has used it
without compassion. This
Administration has no com-
passion for men, for women,
for animals, for minerals, for
vegetables. Under President
Reagan, people are manip-
ulated and our basic human
rights are being taken away.
"When I was a kid and a
woman in Detroit had to get
an abortion, she went to some
God-awful backroom some-
where or if she had the
money she took a flight to
Havana or Haiti. This was so
horrifying to me. And today
... women will have their
choices taken away from
them unless we speak out.
After all, what good is free-
dom of speech unless you
exercise it?
"My anger lies in the
realization that there are so
many lives being savaged ...
and these are holy lives.
What is happening is that we
are seeing crimes against
God. And I feel I absolutely
must speak about it.
"When I was a kid, I gar-
dened a lot, I had a victory
garden, and when I scattered
the seeds in the earth I ap-
preciated what the Bible had
written about our relation-
ship to that earth, our re-
sponsibility to respect it.
"But these are very dif-
ficult times. You see people
who aspire only to possess
materialistic things — going
out like an idiot and buying a
new Cadillac when they could
get by with something more
economical and be a mensch
with what they are earning,
to help solve the human prob-
lems we all must face.
"Yet I've also seen a lot
that has made me hopeful. I
know this one young woman,
she came out of a terrible
home, out of a marriage that
broke up, it was the worst
situation imaginable, a
nightmare house, and she
grew up in this atmosphere
and is now one of the most
wonderful people you could
ever want to meet. She has in
her the kernel of life that
will not die, that will not
give up.
"My own kids have instil-
led this hopefullness in me,
too. They are resolute, tough,

Learn how to take
better care of yourself
and your family,
call Red Cross.

109

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