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October 10, 1986 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

BEST OF EVERYTHING

THE MYSTERY MUNCHER

THE
MYSTERY
MUNCHER writes ... New

A RESTAURANT

Formerly Archibald's

NOW APPEARING

THE RAGE

Monday Evening
Alexander Zonjic Trio

Thru Saturday Evening

Sunday Evening
Live Entertainment

555 S. Woodward
2 Blks. S. of Birmingham Theatre
642-9400
• Casual Dress • Major Credit Cards Accepted • Birmingham Luncheon Shuttle Bus Provided}

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

ri f



fl

WHEREIN WE GO WILD ABOUT MAINE LOBSTER
AND TAME ABOUT PRICING

Now Thru October 31

Dinners starting $ 1 095
from

CHARGRILLED LOBSTER
TAILS Served with roasted

LOBSTER KABOB

Served with rice pilaf

potatoes and fresh vegetables

STEAK & CHARGRILLED
LOBSTER

BAKED STUFFED LOBSTER
LARRY Served with rice pilaf and

Served with roasted potatoes

fresh vegetables

LOBSTER CREOLE

Served with rice pilaf

LOBSTER FETTUCINE VERDE

Served with homemade pasta noodles

ONE POUND LIVE MAINE LOBSTER

Served with roasted potatoes and fresh vegetables.

Outtif ittueei

Altiopiwetheios

25485 Telegraph Rd., Southfield
358-4950

Diagets

30555 Grand River, Farmington
478-3800

56

Friday, October 10, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

York, the glittering, glamor-
ous, throbbing pulse of
America, is a citadel of res-
taurants.
As soon as the Dutch set-
tled New Amsterdam in the
1700s, a tavern was built and
the reconstructed building
still houses a restaurant in
the Wall Street area.
The first cafeteria in the
U.S. was opened in the Big
Apple in 1885 and was dub-
bed the Exchange Buffet. The
automat, which arose in
Germany, gained popularity
in New York.
New York was home to the
first modern restaurants like
Delmonico's, Rector's and
Louis Sherry's where tycoons
such as Diamond Jim Brady
achieved feats of unmatched
gluttony.
It was to New York that
European immigrants
brought their own ethnic di-
versity. And it was New York
that the term "Cafe Society"
was coined and the speakeasy
was born.
Americans at the 1939
New York World's Fair were
introduced to international
cuisines which immediately
became part of the city's gas-
tronomy. Le Pavillon set
standards for deluxe French
dining rooms and vichyssoise
was created at the Ritz
Carlton.
"Broadway," a song written
by Sidney Skolsky and made
famous by Jimmy Durante,
calls that immortal street
"Coffee-pot Canyon, Orange
Juice Gulch." And while the
Great White Way was dotted
with Chinese restaurants, the
song says, "There ain't no
Chinamen in Chinatown."
Cabaret keepers in the
early 1900s were more con-
cerned with the fame of their
filet mignon aux champigon
than they were about how
the Castles danced or Sophie
Tucker peddled a song.
But, later, people didn't go
to nightclubs to eat the chic-
ken sandwiches the size of
postage stamps, chop suey
and egg foo young. It was
said that most of the joy
seekers in New York were so
blotto by 1 a.m. they couldn't
tell a crepe Suzette from
hamburgers smothered with
onions.
The New York restaurant
still was an institution on
Broadway as Rector's and
Churchill's made fortunes.
Hors d'oeuvres cost 65 cents,
chicken soup a la Creole 30
cents, fried smelts Versailles
50 cents and baby chicken en
casserole a hefty $1.50. A full
dinner was less than $5.
Reisenweber on Columbus
Circle was the pioneer of
dinner entertainment and the
cover charge. Reisenweber
gave jazz to Broadway but
the cafe was the first to be
padlocked for possession of
booze.
Lobster palaces and society
dancers were the rage. Chur-

chill's and Rector's featured
musical shows. It was a
highball era when one ounce
of whisky was hidden in ten
ounces of water. John
Dunstan opened the Manhat-
tan Oyster and Chop House.
You'll find the highest and
lowest priced food in New
York but generally it will
cost you more to dine there
than in any other city.
Tourist traps abound. Stay
away from Mama Leone's and
Zimmerman's, for example.
Every city has its Alfredo.
Three Italian restaurants in
Manhattan bear that familiar
name. The best is said to be
on Central Park South off
Columbus Circle. The place is
a favorite of opera stars from
the Met who enjoy the rich
pastas and Italian wines.
American Festival Cafe at
Rockefeller Center is deco-
rated with fine folk art and is
jammed for lunch and break-
fast on the ice-skating rink
and in the dining room.
Amerigo's in the Bronx is
touted as one of New York's
finest Italian restaurants. For
40 years, the dining spot has
been noted for thinly-cut
prosciutto and fettucine Al-
fredo, prime sirloin, veal dis-
hes and desserts. The food is
lusty, abundant, rich and
highly seasoned.
The Ballroom, convenient
to Madison Square Garden,
features tapas, a light meal
of Spanish appetizers such as
anchovies in grape leaves and
curried mussels.
Barbettas on West 46th
Street is New York's oldest,
full-scale Italian restaurant.
It was opened in 1906 and is
still popular with theater
goers. _
Cafe 58 on East 58th Street
is the place to frequent for
French country fare at mod-
erate prices. It's said to be
the closest to a true bistro
you'll find in New York.
Cellar in the Sky is noted
as the best restaurant of 22
in the World Trade Center
complex. The fixed price for a
seven-course meal and five
wines is $70.
Frances Tavern on Broad
and Pearl houses a museum.
In this reconstructed build-
ing, George Washington bid
farewell to his troops in the
1780's. Yankee pot roast is
an old favorite here.
Le Bernardin on West 51st
Street serves the same dishes
that have long made its orig-
inal namesake the foremost
seafood restaurant in Paris.
Seafood buffs rave about the
halibut in warm vinaigrette
and sea urchins in butter
sauce.
Le Cirque on East 65th
Street near Park Avenue is
known as New York's society
restaurant frequented by
such distinguished guests as
Nancy and Ronald Reagan.
You can enjoy lobster and
scallops,. baby lambchops or
pasta primavera or get the
chef
to order something spe-
.
cial.

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