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September 12, 1986 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Detroit Chapter
American Technion Society

ANNOUNCES ITS

38th Annual Dinner

Thursday, October 30, 41986

Adat Shalom Synagogue

29901 Middlehelt Road
Farmington Hills

Guest Speaker

YOSEF YAAKOV

Consul General of Israel, Washington, D.C.
and Minister-Counsellor Embassy of Israel

MARK THE DATE • For information please call the Technion office, 559 5190

-

10

Friday, September 12, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

NOTEBOOK

FACTORY
PRICES!

1 ■ 111/

II= III
WIN •

Chess Master Mixes
Menace And Maneuver

VICTOR BIENSTOCK

Special to The Jewish News

G

ary Kimovich
Kasparov, a
youngster whose
father was Jewish and his
mother Armenian, making
him something of a maverick
in his native Soviet Union, is
defending his hard-won world
chess championship in a best of
24 matches against another
Soviet citizen who represents
almost everything Kasparov
has rebelled against in his 23
years.
They are planning for what
are very high stakes in chess
competition — purses totalling
$900,000 — but both have
agreed to turn the winnings
over to a fund for the victims of
the Chernobyl nuclear disas-
ter. The first 12 games were
scheduled for London and the
second 12 for Leningrad.
Child prodigies have been
frequent in the chess world —
one has only to recall Sammy
Reshevsky and the moody
Bobby Fischer — but Gary,
who began to play at the age of
six, won the Soviet youth
championship at the age of 13
and took his first major inter-
national tournament at the
age of 16, overpowering some
of Europe's most outstanding
grand masters. He attained the
rank of international grand
master a year later and was a
leading contestant for the
championship by the age of 21.
He won the championship
title last year after a long and
gruelling series that was not
resolved until the final match
of a 24-game duel. He took the
title from a fellow Soviet citi-
zen, Anatoly Karpov, against
whom he is currently defend-
ing his title. That match fol-
lowed an extraordinary contest
which was terminated after 48
games when Karpov, 35, ap-
peared on the verge of collapse.
A chess student said that this
series "finally made the child
prodigy into a real champion.
From an impetuous youth who
lost four of the first nine
games, he grew into a patient,
resourceful and mature player
capable of outwaiting Karpov,
yet ready to pounce."
A chess aficionado has de-
scribed the rivalry between the
two men as a "blood feud be-
tween two styles, two temper-
aments, two symbols." Karpov,
he said, was the master techni-
cian capable of exploiting the
most minute advantage
through flawlessly executed if
colorless maneuvers. Kas-
parov, however, "is the brash
artist, taking bold chances,
making breathtaking sac-
rifices and hunting for his op-
ponent's king with passion."
Something of this was evi-
dent in the first game of the
current series. Emulating
Bobby Fischer, Gary used an
opening in world cham-
pionship -play that he had
never tried before. It worked. A
reporter covering the match

noted that Gary had "found
just the right mixture of
menace and maneuver to dis-
courage the former champion
from setting up his famous
brand of siege warfare." His foe
was compelled to offer a draw.
Gary tried to explain his
game to an interviewer once in
these words: "From the very
beginning of a game, I strive to
make it as sharp as possible
and to take it outside the famil-
iar patterns. My games begin
with tension, then I feel more
confident of myself."
Gary was born in Baku and
attended school there. His
father, Kim Veinshtein, died
when he was a child and Gary

In the first game,
Gary used an
opening that had
never been tried
before. It worked.

subsequently adopted hs
mother's Russified name. At
the age of 10, he became a pupil
of Mikhail Botvinnik, the
chess master who had been
world champion for nearly 15
years.



Helen Suzman was a cham-
pion of human rights and a foe
of apartheid even before the
first Nationalist regime in
South Africa placed the re-
strictive laws on the books that
relegated the country's black
majority to a state of semi-
serfdom. She warned against
the use of sanctions as a
weapon to compel the regime to
rescind the oppressive legisla-
tion which even before the
sanctions movement became
deeply rooted.
The worst laws entrenching
apartheid and eroding human
rights had not yet been enacted
when she entered the South
African parliament, she noted
when she accepted the Ameri-
can Liberties Medallion of the
American Jewish Committee
in 1984. "I have been
privileged to have had the
opportunity to record my oppo-
sition to all those laws in the 32
years I have spent in parlia-
ment," she said then, "I have
had a ringside seat watching
the incredible jigsaw puzzle of
apartheid being assembled,
piece by piece, legally
entrenching racial segregation
in every facet of life."

Today, paradoxically, this
woman who bitterly opposed -
this legislation — often as the
lone dissenting voice in Parli-
ament — finds herself allied
with President Reagan and
Prime Minister Thatcher in I
opposing sanctions. Her rea-
sons are pretty much those she
expressed two years ago when
she said that the key to peace-
ful change in South Africa re-
sted in the expansion of the
economy for the country's 24
million blacks.
Suzman still holds this posi-

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