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August 29, 1986 - Image 85

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The

The Family Of The Late

Family of the Late

EVELYN MIRIAM
HORNE

CELIA
BEAN

lobby of the Security Council
— in full view of dozens of
other UN delegates.
U.S. officials predicted that
the Soviets will continue such
informal discussions with
Israel in various third-
country capitals. Thus, the
Soviet and Israeli ambassa-
dors in Washington, Paris or
elsewhere are likely to meet
from time to time. The Amer-
icans believe that the more
formal structure of discus-
sions — along the lines of the

relatively low-level Helsinki
meeting of last week — will
also occur. But no one should
anticipate any rapid break-
through.
There are other Soviet
motives in opening the door
toward Israel as well. Accor-
ding to American Kremlin-
ologists, the Soviet leader-
ship has been seriously
alarmed by the reports of
another potential full-scale
war between Israel and Syria.
"Syria is to the Soviet Union

Shcharansky Family
Reunited In Israel

Natan Shcharansky

Tel Aviv (JTA) — The fam-
ily of former imprisoned
Soviet Jewish activist Natan
Shcharansky- was reunited
with friends amid emotional
greetings at Ben Gurion Air-
port Monday night.
Shcharansky's mother, 77-
year-old Ida Milgrom, arrived
with her elder son Leonid, 41,
his wife Raya, 40, and their
children Alexander, 14 and
Boris, 18 months. Natan, 38,
had flown to Vienna earlier
Monday to meet his family's
flight from Moscow and ac-
company them here aboard
an El Al flight.
Although the family and
close friends had asked well
wishers not to come to the
airport, the arrival area was
packed tight with local and
foreign reporters who jostled
and pestered the family for
statements they were appar-
ently not prepared to make.
Milgrom, with tears in her
eyes, told the crowd: "I am
happy, happy, happy to be at
last with all my children. She
sat between her sons, holding
their hands. She spoke in
Russian and Natan trans-
lated for her into Hebrew and
English.
Both thanked all those who
made the reunion possible.
Natan, now fluent in Hebrew,
said: "This is not simply
wonderful. It is an important
lesson that no quiet diplo-
macy, even at the highest
levels, can help if it is not ac-

companied by a strong public
campaign to convince the
Soviet Union to let our people
go."
Leonid denied a Newsweek
magazine report that he did
not think he would remain in
Israel. "It is very, very good
to be here on our land. I am
very happy that the case of
Shcharansky has ended just
now." he said.
He added that Soviet Jews
did not feel more hopeful
after last week's Soviet-Israel
talks in Helsinki. "These
talks," he said, "meant noth-
ing to Soviet Jews." He
stressed that the situation of
Soviet Jews was very bad.
Leonid begged off further
questions, explaining that he
was "very very tired . I
have a young baby here.
Please let me go."

Ida Milgrom

In Moscow, the family bid
an emotional farewell to
friends at Sheremetyevo In-
ternational Airport. "Now I
don't have Soviet citizenship.
Now I don't have a passport,"
Milgrom said. "But I have
the dream of being reunited
with my Anatoly (who has
changed his name to Natan),
who lost his life and regained
it — and what more could a
mother want."
She had refused to emi-
grate from the Soviet Union
while Natan was imprisoned.
She visited him in prison
whenever she was allowed.
She said her separation from
her friends would be difficult
and admitted to being nerv-
ous. "I want to cry and I
want to laugh," she said.

what Israel is to the United
States," an American govern-
mental expert said. "The
Soviets will not allow their al-
ly to suffer yet another
humiliating defeat."
The Soviet leadership is
said to recognize that Israel
still has the military capabil-
ity of defeating the Syrians in
a one-on-one basis — impres-
sively, decisively and rela-
tively quickly. The Soviets
have made a major invest-
ment in resupplying the
Syrians with a new genera-
tion of military equipment
since 1982. There are still
about 5,000 Soviet advisers
in Syria as well as in Syrian-
controlled portions of
Lebanon, especially in the
Bekaa Valley.
Thus, some U.S. officials
believe that the Soviet deci-
sion to improve ties with
Israel may be aimed at defus-
ing the tensions along the
Syrian frontier. This was,
after all, a major subject on
the agenda during Murphy's
recent meeting with Polya-
kov in Stockholm.
The Soviets are also said to
have been alarmed by the en-
hanced strategic cooperation
between Washington and
Jerusalem. Israel's decision
to permit the Voice of Amer-
ica to construct giant radio
transmitters in the Negev
and to undertake joint mili-
tary exercises with the U.S.
,. in the eastern Mediterranean
have caught the Soviets by
surprise. They apparently
want to try to turn back this
tide.
r In a brief editorial entitled
"Chutzpa Hall of Fame," The
Wall Street Journal ridiculed
the Soviet Union's conten-
tion that it was primarily
concerned over the Russian
Orthodox Church property in
Jerusalem as justification for
its initiating the Helsinki
meeting. The Soviet regime,
it said, "has done for religion
what Dracula did for moon-
light strolls in Transylvania."
What the Soviets really
wanted, it concluded, was "a
bigger role in the Mideast."

The New York Times

agreed. It added, however,
that the Soviets may be anx-
ious to use the Israeli card in
order to improve their rela-
tionship with the United
States. According to the
newspaper, the former Soviet
Ambassador in Washington,
Anatoly Dobrynin, is "key"
to the new Soviet moves in
the Middle East. Dobrynin,
who spent 24 years in Wash-
ington, became a member of
the top Soviet leadership in
February.
"The Soviets view Israel as
important not only in the
Middle East context, but in
the entire U.S.-Soviet con-
text," an American said.

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in her
memory at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 7, at Hebrew
Memorial Park. Rabbi
Rosenbaum and Cantor
Klein will officiate. Rela-
tives and friends are in-
vited to attend.

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in her
memory at 10:30 a.m'.
Sunday, Sept. 14, at Adat
Shalom Memorial Park.
Rabbi Arm will officiate.
Relatives and friends are
asked to attend.

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

STANTON P.
BOCKNEK

JENNIE
KRAMER

Announces fhe unveil-
ing of a monument in his
memory at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 7, at Adat Shalom
Memorial Park. Rabbi
Freedman will officiate.
Relatives and friends are
asked to attend.

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in her
memory at 11 a.m., Sun-
day, Aug. 31, at Clover Hill
Park Cemetery. Relatives
and friends are asked to
attend.

The Family of the Late

The Family of The Late

BERNARD A.
BREYER

ROSE
MANELI

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in his
memory at 1 p.m., Sunday,
Aug. 31, at Clover Hill
Park Cemetery. Rabbi
Groner will officiate. Rela-
tives and friends are asked
to attend.

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in her
memory at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 7, at
Machpelah
Cemetery.
Rabbi Yolkut will of-
ficiate. Relatives and
friends are asked to
attend.

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

GOLDA C.
GELBART BROOKS

WILLIAM
SURATH

of Midland, Mich.
Announces the unveiling
of a monument in his
memory at 1:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 14, at the Bay
City Jewish Community
Cemetery. Relatives and
friends are invited to
attend.

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in her
memory at 11 a.m., Sun-
day,. Aug. 31, at Clover
Hill Park Cemetery. Rev.
Fred S. Margolis will of-
ficiate. Relatives and
friends are asked to
attend.

The Family of the Late

The . Family of the Late

ABE
CHODAK

LINCOLN
WELTON

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in his
memory at 3:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 7, at Hebrew
Memorial Park. Rabbi
David Nelson will of-
ficiate. Relatives and
friends are asked to
attend.

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in his
memory at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 7, at Hebrew Memo-
rial Park. Rabbi Chaim
Bergstein will officiate.
Relatives and friends are
asked to attend.

N

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

MARY
GREENFIELD

'BERKO
ZDANOWICZ

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in her
memory at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, Sept. 7, at Hebrew
Memorial Park. Rabbi
Gorrelick will officiate.
Relatives and friends are
asked to attend.

Announces the unveil-
ing of a monument in his
memory at 4 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 7, at Mezeritcher
Cemetery. Rabbi Schnip-
per will officiate. Rela-
tives and friends are
asked to attend.

THE BRIGHT IDEA

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