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August 29, 1986 - Image 84

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

REAL ESTATE

CAPITOL REPORT

WOLF BLITZER

FOR SALE

HUNTINGTON WOODS
JUST LISTED
Stately
all
brick
Georgian colonial.
Totally updated plus
loaded with charm.
Home features 3
bedrooms, library,
formal dining room,
natural _ fireplace,
screened in porch, 2
car garage. Shows
model.
like
a
(365HE). $115,000.
Ask for ADRIENNE BRYANT

CENTURY 21
Town & Country

HUNTINGTON WOODS
VACANT -
IMMEDIATE POSSESSION

Custom built 2100 sq.
ft. Huntington Road
ranch with gorgeous
kitchen, marble floor-
ing, 4th bedroom
and full bath off rec.
room, spacious floor
plan, screened and
carpeted porch.
Lovely landscaped
lot. $139,900.

HUNTINGTON WOODS

Four bedroom brick
ranch, living room,
dining room, large
country kitchen, fam-
ily room, cen. air,
1 1/2 baths, 2 car att.
garage. $105,000

Call 399-7285

FARMINGTON HILLS CONDO

POMEROY

524-1600 or 879-0055

559-3344

W. BLOOMFIELD
OPEN SUN. 2-5
5838 DUNMORE DR.

(W. of Orchard Lake, S. of Walnut Lake Rd.)
Stunning custom built colonial. Much use of
ceramic tile & marble. Gourmet kitchen, fire-
place & built in dry bar in F.R., whirlpool in
master bath plus separate stall shower, cen.
air, deck, circular drive, professionally land-
. scaped. Move-in condition. $174,900.

W. BLOOMFIELD

House beautiful. Shows like a model. Fireplace
& lighted wet bar in family room, cen. air,
finished rec. room, deck, professionally land-
scaped, sprinkling system. $134,900.

WATERFORD TOWNSHIP

Built in 1980. Spacious 3 bedroom ranch, neut-. ,
ral decor, detached 1 car garage. Lake -
privileges. Move-in condition. $62,000.

14 Mlle - Middlebelt

Two bedrooms, 2
baths, cen. air, pool,
tennis, walk-out _to
courtyard. By Owner.

$72,500.

626.4563

W. BLOOMFIELD CONDO
ON BABBLING BROOK

Two bedroom, 2 1/2
bath
townhouse,
finished basement, 2
car att. garage, 2
decks.• Principals only.
OPEN SUN. 1 - 4
6220 ANDREA LANE
POTOMAC TOWNE II
(Maple-Farmington Road)
661-4947

Our Classified Ads
Get Fast Results

Ask for SARAH RHODES

626-5680

681-5700

REAL ESTATE ONE

DRAKESHIRE
CONDOMINIUMS

an exciting development in
prestigious west bloomfield

luxurious custom ranch models
now under construction - just in
time to pick your colors -
2 or 3 bedrooms - 2 1/2 baths

$194,900

off maple - just east of drake

BUILDER'S HOME
IN BLOOMFIELD TWP.
Brick ranch. Out-
standing family ET liv-
ing room, great for
entertaining, 3 full
baths, 3 bedrooms,
3 car garage. Many
extras. Lake privi-
leges. Birmingham
Schools.
$132, 500.
Call owner after
6 pm & weekends
851-5891

MAPLE - FRANKLIN ROS.

Contemporary 2400
sq: ft. ranch on huge
park-like treed lot.
Totally renovated
interior with gourmet
kitchen, deluxe ca-
binetry & built-ins, 22
x 22 family room,
hardwood floors. See
it! $187,900.

transferee service, inc.
office 851-6700 model 661-0410

corporate

model hours: 1-5 daily except thurs.

POMEROY

559-3344

Look/of-Id Ai/ hilheWAHT ADS-

//NW ///////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////////////////////////////////?/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////)///////////////////////

84

Friday, August 29, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Has USSR Really Decided
To Better Ties With Israel?

U S. officials were not
very surprised by
the Soviet Union's
harsh denunciation of Israel
in the immediate aftermath
of the one-day round of for-
mal Israeli-Soviet talks in
Helsinki.
The Americans said that
the Soviet Union was well
aware of Israel's plan to raise
the matter of Soviet Jewry
during those discussions.
Israel had widely broadcast
this intention in advance.
U.S. experts believe that
the strident Soviet reaction
in public may be designed
simply to allay the fears
among the radical Arab
states, especially Syria, that
Moscow and Jerusalem would
shortly restore diplomatic
ties. And what is apparently
of even greater= concern to
some of these Arabs is the
prospect of more Soviet Jews
arriving in Israel.
Beyond the need to re-
assure the Arabs, U.S. offi-
cials said, the Soviets were
also outlining a tough open-
ing position with Israel as
part of their "politics of the
marketplace." This is seen as
a typical Soviet ploy in any
round of negotiations.
There is, though, a clear
consensus among authorita-
tive governmental specialists
in Washington that the Krem-
lin leadership has made a ma-
jor decision to improve rela-
tions with Israel.
"They are slow to move," a
State Department official
said. "But even though they
are cautious, they are mov-
ing. The fact that they met
with the Israelis in Helsinki
before the eyes of the world
was significant in and of
itself."
The Moscow correspondent
of The Washington Post,
Celestine Bohlen, wrote that
"both the meeting and the
fallout were part of the script
— , with each side playing to
its own constituency: Jeru-
salem to its domestic audi-
ence, Moscow to jittery Arab
allies."
The Reagan Administra-
tion, for its part, has been on
record for several years in
supporting a resumption of
diplomatic relations between
Moscow and Jerusalem. In-
deed, senior U.S. officials
have repeatedly cited this as
essential in demonstrating
the Soviet Union's genuine
commitment to the Arab-
Israeli peace process.
In addition, the State
Department has urged the
Soviets to curtail arms
shipments to radical Arab
states and to ease the plight
of Soviet Jewry. This •would
supposedly underline a new
and more "constructive"
Soviet policy.
There have been regular



'

"regional" meetings between
U.S. and Soviet specialists on
the Middle East over the past
two years: Most recently,
Assistant Secretary of State
for Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs Richard Mur-
phy met in Stockholm earlier
this summer with his Soviet
counterpart, Vladimir Polya-
kov. Nothing new emerged
from that session. A year
earlier, they met in Geneva.
Clearly, U.S. officials said,
the Soviets are still very anx-
ious to try to play a more cen-
tral role in any revived Arab-
Israeli diplomacy. For the
Kremlin leadership, this is a
matter of high prestige and
statesmanship. Moscow is
afraid of being left out of the
scene.
The U.S. is not necessarily
opposed — provided that the
Kremlin first moves decisive-
ly on the matters of restoring
relations with Israel, curbing
lethal arms sales to Arab
states and permitting greater
emigration.
U.S. officials have noted
that Prime Minister Shimon
Peres, during his United Na-
tions General Assembly ad-
dress last October, similarly
signalled an Israeli readiness
to accept a more highly-visi-
ble Soviet role if some of
those conditions were met.
The Americans assume this
Israeli position will remain in
effect following the scheduled
governmental "rotation" in
October.
There is a prevailing sense
in Washington that the
Soviets would indeed like to
improve their relationship
with Israel. But they are
clearly uncomfortable as they
grope around for some
modest first steps in the
process.
Everyone recognizes that
the Soviets had to extend a
green light to Poland before
it could establish low-level
diplomatic "interest sec-
tions" with Israel. Hungary,
Bulgaria and other Eastern
European regimes would
need similar permission.
Israel's United Nations
Ambassador, Benjamin
Netanyahu, was confident
that the Soviets would even-
tually restore relations with
Israel. He told some 3,000
delegates at the Hadassah
National Convention in
Miami Beach on Aug. 19 that
the process was "slow, but it
is actually happening." He
said that it was in the Krem-
lin's leadership — "just as
much as ours" — to establish
normal relations.
At the United Nations,
Netanyahu has met informal-
ly with Soviet officials. He
recalled that the former
Soviet Ambassador, Oleg
Trayonovsky, once invited
him to a meeting outside the

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