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July 18, 1986 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-07-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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REMOTE CONTROL
FOR FAN

', "t.•1/4\

REG. $49 95

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ONLY 14 TO SELL

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DCF INC.

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STORE HOURS:
SUN. 12-3
MON. & THURS. 10-8
TUES., WED., FRI.
SAT. 10-5

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(12 HI PLAZA)
BETWEEN NORTHWESTERN & TELEGRAPH

NAME
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pow,

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358-2646

NA'AMAT (Formerly
USA GREATER
DETROIT COUNCIL
Pioneer Women/Na'amat)

ANNUAL SPIRITUAL ADOPTION LUNCHEON

Southfield Hilton

17017 West Nine Mile
Southfield

Thursday, July 31

12:00 p.m.

Lt. Goy. Martha GriffitM

Honorary Chairman

Ruth Leeman Miller

Ann Kaplan

Council Chairwoman

Council President

CELEBRATION OF WOMEN AWARDS

Recipients:

Noreen Keating

Dr. Helene Mills

GIVE A GIFT
-OF LOVE

Couvert $50.00

($36.00 Tax Deductible)

70

Friday, July 18, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Anna Weiner

Make your check payable to:

NA'AMAT USA

25900 Greenfield Rd.
Suite 205-D
Oak Park, MI 48237

967-4750

ANALYSIS

Difference

Continued from Page 67

ish. "The average Jew from
the Diaspora is struggling to
cope with a Jewish identity in
a non-Jewish country. He is
usually ignorant of his her-
itage. We hope to make him
want to learn about Judaism
before he renounces it."

A national context

Jewish things. Not only ii
you socialize with othei
Jews."
According to Rudolph who
was, for many years, Hillel
Director at the University of
Michigan, this dilemma of
young Jews stems from
openness of Western society
Jews' response to the lure of
total assimilation has been,
at best, half-hearted.
"The typical Jewish home"
said Rudolph, "isn't infused
with Jewish content. Parents/
send their kids to Hebrew
school without much motiv•',
tion or reinforcement."
Or, parents' ignorance may
make them incapable of pas-
sing on Jewish traditions.
"They feel inadequate," said
Rudolph. "Why else do peo
ple sit at the back of the
synagogue? They're afraid to
be called on."
To sum up Jewish religious
practice in the United States,
Rudolph said, "High Holiday
services, Passover seders, the
U.J.A. If there's a crisis in ,
Israel, people get mobilized.
There's a gut feeling that you
should get active. But the
rest of the time, Judaism's on
the back burner."

Glen Hammel, 23, is look-
ing for the content on which
to rest his strong Jewish feel-
ings. He is spending a year in
Israel before returning to his
native California to begin his
graduate studies.
"It definitely takes extra
effort to be a Jew in the
Galut," he said. "Where I
grew up, orthodoxy was not
the norm, so you had to
decide for yourself which
halachah (Jewish law) and
which customs to follow."
Glen says that he cannot
separate his Jewishness from
his upbringing or from his
own self-identity. "When I'm
asked accusingly by Ortho-
dox Jews, 'What makes you
a Jew when you're Reform
and can choose what you
want?" my. answer is that I
feel Jewish."
This feeling, not easy to
qualify, is common among
Diaspora Jews with a strong • A light unto the Jews
Jewish identity, but without
The religious Israeli is con- \
an equally strong Jewish
fident, even arrogant; about
education.
his Jewishness. He treats
More concretely, though
Shabbat, the holidays, the
Glen sees Judaism as more
Torah with an easy familiar-
than just a religion. "I see my
ity.
self as a Jew in a national
Not so the young secular
context," he said. Israel is the
Israeli. In speaking with
manifestation of that iden-
them, one enters a strange
tity."
world of confused identities.
"For me," he said, "Juda-
Their patents and grand-
ism is terribly interesting.
parents pioneered and built
But growing up in America,
the country, many out of the
I found that the vast major-
ideal of creating a new Jew.
ity of people my age saw be-
The Founding Generation
ing a Jew as, at best ana-
succeeded beyond its wildest
chronistic and, at worst a
hopes, so much so that the
burden."
new Jews don't see them-
Why?
selves as Jews at all.
"The goal, the payoff in
Many concerned Jews see
America is material. The
Israel's task not as a light
payoff in Judaism is spirit-
unto the Gentiles, but as a
ual."
much needed light unto the
Jews. But how can Israel pos-
sibly fulfil this mission when
On the back burner
so many young Israelis feel
"Most young Jews in
no organic links to their
America are comfortable be-
Jewish heritage, when they
ing Jewish," said Rabbi
have trouble defining what
William Rudolph, National
Judaism is, and when they
Director of Personnel Ser-
often identify themselves not
vices of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
by who they are, but rather
Foundation. "They express
by who they are not?
their Jewishness in terms of
Ya'ara Halperin, 24, and
their choice of friends. They
Nava Carmel, 23, are room-
are happy to be in a Jewish
mates in Jerusalem.
social setting."
"I'm not religious," Ya'ara
But Rudolph saw a dark
said, "but I believe that Jews
cloud in this silver lining:
are a people with a specific
"Judaism for these young
culture and tradition, and
adults is tangential on an un-
that's what is special about
conscious level and doesn't
us.
affect the major decisions
"I was born into it, "she
they make. This can be pretty
said. "I'm a part of it.
dangerous."
Judaism came from the
It can lead to intermar-
religion, but we're a people, )
riage, often a Jewish dead-
not a religion."
end. "Being Jewish," he said,
Therefore, Ya'ara said,
"is meaningful only if you do
Jews should reside in their

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