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April 18, 1986 - Image 72

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



72 Friday, April 18, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

The Best in Dining

CARL'S :01:E

3020 Grand River
Free Parking

Send Someone
Special a Gift
52 Weeks a Year.

„, 1 .1

Send a gift
subscription to

833-0700

Nationally known for serving 4,14 Prize Blue Ribbon
Steak and Chops. Finest Seafood and Liquors.

Private Dining Rooms for Banquets and Parties

Serving daily from 11:30 — Sunday from 2 p.m

SPORTS

Boston And Beyond

THE

• _
AU bat
WI in

Continued from Page 65

JEWISH NEWS!

OW own
OWNS

10 Mile at Southfield Road
559-4230

Michaelson and Robinson hit the road near the Jewish Community
Center.

Extends Best Wishes
For A Joyous And
Healthy .

Passouer

• ••••••••••••••••••••••••aoloo•••••
BARBARA & STAN SNITZ

AND THE EMPLOYEES OF

a

• 0

.3







DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT



0


13821 W. 9 Mile Rd. • Oak Park





54G-1111 or 541.2888

Wish To Extend Wishes For A
Healthy & Happy Passover
To Our Customers & Friends





0

WE WILL CLOSE WED., APRIL 23 AT 3 p.m.
REOPENING FRI., MAY 2, 11 a.m.

O


a

OUR NEW SUMMER HOURS
AS OF FRI., MAY 2 WILL BE
MON. 11 TO 3 p.m.
TUES.-SUN 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.



• •

FREE DELIVERY ON ALL PARTY TRAYS
IN OAKLAND 'COUNTY


424






Minimum 10 Persons

•••••••0••••0•••••• •.006


,
,

1

•• • elks

remember I was in Boston or in
the Marathon. I learned a les-
son. In learning I said I'm going
to beat that thing."
And so he didn't quit, return-
ing to Boston three more times.
However, Gelfond sees Boston
"as a hassle. It's expensive for
one race ... It starts at noon.
You've got to get up early and
get onto a bus and then wait ...
When I run I want to enjoy it."
Michaelson, though, and
Robinson swear by Boston.
"There's something about Bos-
ton," Michaelson says. "Al-
though this year there is prize
money, it's really the last bas-
tion for the serious amateur.
I've done New York five times
and many other marathons.
There's always been big money
changing hands. This year, fi-
nally, Boston is paying the top
runners because they weren't
getting a good field. When
somebody asks you a question
(about marathoning), they say,
'Oh, did you ever run Boston?'
It's a great marathon. The
prestige and tradition of Boston
is such that it isn't the same as
anywhere else."
Robinson, who was chairman
of the 1984 United States Mac-
cabi Youth Games held in De-
troit, says all marathons are
judged by the standards set at
Boston.
"Everybody says you go to
Boston to have a good time, not
to run a good time," he adds.
"There are two things differ-
ent about Boston. The eliteness,
because Boston is like the World
Series. The race is 90 years old.
People who never heard of any
other marathon have heard of
Boston. And when ydu run Bos-
ton you run through Wellesley
and there are 20,000 girls lining
the street. There are so many
traditions. It's a high you'll
never forget.
"You take a number. There
are rosters. These college stu-
dents lining the street look at
the rosters and when they see
you going by they call you by
your name. That's really excit-
ing."
"Heartbreak Hill" is really a.
series bf hills about 151/2 miles
into the race "just when you
don't need them," Robinson
says, and lasting almost five
\t

miles. Spectators "are screaming
for you to get up the hill. I've
got a cousin in Boston who's got
his own place where he's sat to
watch for 25 years."
There are about 8,000 legiti-
mate runners, Robinson. ex-
plains, and about as many
"bandits" — unqualified and
unentered runners who ran
anyway.
Robinson says he was
stationed in Boston in the Navy
in 1959 when the event had
perhaps 100 runners, yet still it
was "the greatest event in the
world" in his eyes.
"If I was an Arab I'd like to go
to Mecca," he says. "And if

"I was a non-athlete
all my life —
overweight and
uncoordinated.
Running became
part of my way of
life. It taught me to
have faith in
humanity."

you're a runner you go to Bos-
ton. There's nothing comparable
to it."
Robinson says his' brother
Mickey, who is 57, is a psychiat-
rist who "got the bug" a few
years ago and noW runs at Bos-
ton. There is a special group of
about 500 doctors who run in
the Boston Marathon, whose
qualification times don't have to
match the regular standards,
Robinson says. The regular
qualification 'times are two
hours, fifty minutes for men
under 40 and 3:20 for women
under 40; 3:10 for men and 3:30
for women from 40-50; 3:20 for
men 50-60; and 3:30 for men 60
or older.
The .qualifying times, he says,
eliminate all but .a handful of
the 100-125 or so runners who
frequent the Jewish Community
Center track.
. Michaelson says the Boston
Marathon "has a carnival at-
mosphere. It's Patriots Day.

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