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April 18, 1986 - Image 102

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i64.

Friday, April 18, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

NEWS

A Big Reason for Sencling Small
Packages with The Packaging Store.

A Small Price

Packaging
Store

10 lbs.
W. Bloomfield to Miami



$9.44

25 lbs.
W. Bloomfield to New York

$9.24

$16.06

50 lbs.
W. Bloomfield to L.A.

$34.18

$52.06

We Handle

Over the Limit

Weekday Hours
'til 6:00 pm

Mon. thru Fri.

None

Saturday Hours

Full Service
10 am - 2 pm

Some do
Some don't

Insurance - $100
$500

$.50
$2.50

$1.40
$4.40

Professional
Packing Service

Yes

No

Yes

No

Almost Never

Almost Always

71 lbs.
or more

.; I

1.1

Complete Packaging
• Supply Center

Long Lines

Continued from preceding page

U.S. Post Office
First Class Mail

$7.14

$16.0 6

$9.24

Costs as of 4-14-86

HAND

"

cARE

U.S. Post Office
First Class Mail

Packaging Store

ihig
Pat
-LioTh

6453 Farmington Rd.
(at Maple Rd.)

West Bloomfield

855-5822

BE A WINNER, PLAY

Tougher On Terrorism

THE CLASSIFIEDS

Call The Jewish News
Today

354-6060

Sale of the Month mentality in
the Administration. President
Reagan should have sent Vice
President Bush to Saudi Arabia
to raise the possibility of peace
with Israel, not to raise the
price of oil," Kennedy said.
Heinz, while sharing Ken-
nedy's opposition to arms sales
to Arab governments which are
not involved in the peace proc-
ess, strongly defended the Ad-
ministration's record on Israel.
President Reagan, the Senator
said, "restored our relationship
with Israel, not as a burden, but
as an ally."
He pointed to the free Trade
Area agreement between the
two countries (which phases in
the lowering and eventual aboli-
tion of trade tariffs), the pro-
vision of 1.5 billion in grants —
not loans — to Israel last year,
the strategic cooperation agree-
ments on military maneuvers
and research, and the $10.6 bil-
lion in U.S. aid to Israel over
the last six years, "more than
any previous administration,"
Heinz said.
Stressing the ties between the
two counries, Heinz concluded,
"Israel's struggle is America's
struggle."
Eleven Senators, in addition
to Kennedy and Heinz, were
present at an evening dinner, as
well as numerous Congressmen
and candidates for public office,
a testament to AIPAC's impact
on the political scene.
Earlier, conference partici-,
pants, who came not only to
hear the scheduled speakers, but
also to lobby their representa-
tives on Capitol Hill on behalf of
Israel, were told of a new ag-
ricultural agreement between
the Jewish state and the State
of Texas. Called the Texas-Israel
Exchange (TIE), the accord calls
for cooperation in such areas as
irrigation, dry land field crops,

Benjamin Netanyahu

aquaculture and saline water
usage.
CIA Director William Casey,
in a rare public appearance, was
the first speaker at the confer-
ence. Blasting the Soviet Union
and Mikhail Gorbachev for seek-
ing to spread subversion, Casey
speculated that Moscow may in-
crease its support for Libya and
promote "a more aggressive Sy-
rian military posture toward Is-
rael, abandon Arafat, and throw
full support behind leftist and
Syria-backed factions of the
PLO."
Casey said there is little the
U.S. can do to persuade the
Saudis to stop funding the PLO.
He said the Saudis supply
money to the terrorist group "for
reasons of fear, intimidation and
pursuing their own foreign pol-
icy objectives." He added that
cooperation between the U.S.
and Israel has increased on
intelligence-gathering against
terrorism.

Less Than Consensus
On. AIPAC's Decision

li
To A l! p p
o f oyurpfr A
ienisd
s aivcEushomers

37911 GRAND RIVER AVE., FARMINGTON HILLS

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Washington — An undercur-
rent at the annual AIPAC policy
conference in Washington was
an air of frustration over the
organization's decision to not
oppose the Saudi arms deal pro-
posed by the Administration,
after initially leading the attack
against the $350 million sale.
Tom Dine, AIPAC's executive
director, addressed the issue di-
rectly in his state-of-AIPAC pre-
sentation, asserting that "we de-
cided not to fight (the Saudi)
arms sale because in our best
judgment, the cost of a confron-
tation with the Administration
would have been greater than
the marginal benefit of stopping
the arms sale."
He characterized the U.S.-
Israel relationship at this time
as "excellent" and said that in
the constant balancing act of
weighing the costs and benefits
of any given action, it was de-
termined that "this particular
arms package would have ques-
tionable impact on the security

ti;

of Israel." He added that he
found "a remarkable consensus
among the major Jewish organ-
izations in our community"
agreeing that "we would not be
justified in mounting a major
campaign to confront the Ad-
ministration's policy in this par-
ticular case."
But several national Jewish
leaders took issue with Dine's
assessment, saying they were
not consulted before AIPAC
made its decision. Zmira Good-
man, the executive director of
Hadassah, said that "whatevbr
`consensus' means, I can tell you'
that we weren't contacted before
or after the decision." She said
that her organization remains
firmly opposed to the sale and is
committed to "not leaving Sena-
tors and Representatives out on
the limb after they were given
the signal" by AIPAC to oppose
the sale. '
"There was a strong feeling in
the halls and in the corridors
among the activists at the con-

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