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March 01, 1985 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, March 1, 1985

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Jerusalem (JTA) — Prime
Minister Shimon Peres this week
welcomed a proposal by Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak for di-
rect talks between Israel and a
joint delegation composed of
Palestinians and Jordanians. The
Mubarak proposal comes at the
heels of the accord on a framework
for Middle East peace reached last
month between Jordan's King
Hussein and Palestine Liberation
Organization leader Yassir
Arafat.
One of Mubarak's closest ad-
visors,- Ossama El-Baz, was ex
pected in Israel this week, appar-
ently carrying a message from the
Egyptian president, who leaves
for Washington to meet with
President Reagan on March 8.
Political sources in Jerusalem
said Mubarak proposed the direct
talks as an alternative to an in-
ternational conference on the
Middle East, which is favored by
the Soviet Union and the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization and
opposed by Israel and the United
States.
But according to an interview
with Mubarak, published Monday
in the New York Times, the Egyp-
tian leader's proposal was for di-
rect talks between Israel and a
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation
as only a first step, to be followed
by an international conference in
which the Soviet and all other
parties concerned would partici-
pate.
The Hussein-Arafat accord has
drawn a mixed reaction from
political figures in Israel. In a
story published this week in Le
Monde, Deputy Prime Minister
and Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir differed with Peres, main-
taining that the accord "does not
serve in the interests of peace."
But the Israeli leader, on a
week-long visit to France, West
Germany and Holland, did not
rule out the possibility of a meet-
ing between Peres and Hussein.
The conditions for such an even-
tuality "have been foreseen and
are covered by the agreement
which set up the (Labor-Likud)
coalition government," he said.
He saw the Hussein-Arafat ac-
cord, however, as a tactical move
to draw the United States into
contact with the PLO. The agree-
ment was announced on Feb. 11
but the Jordanian and PLO ver-
sions, which emerged only this
weekend, were contradictory in
several key aspects.
Shamir met with French
president Francois Mitterrand
and was the guest of honor at a
state dinner given by Foreign
Minister Roland Dumas Monday.
In Bonn, Shamir met with
Chancellor Helmut Kohl.
The main purpose of Shamir's
trip was to get guarantees for Is-
rael's agricultural exports to
Western Europe after Spain and
Portugal are admitted to the ten-
nation European Economic
Community (EEC).
In Washington, the Reagan
Administration reiterated this
week that it will not become in-
volved in Arab-Israeli negotia-
tions, as called for by Mubarak,
until the Arabs agree to direct
negotiations with Israel.
At the same tithe; the AdniihiS"-

tration indicated that while it
views the Hussein-Arafat agree-
ment as a positive note, it does not
yet see it as including the U.S.
requirement for direct negotia-
tions.
"As we have said, we are ready
to re-engage in the search for a
just and lasting peace in the Mid-
dle East whenever the parties are
ready," State Department
spokesman Bernard Kalb said
when asked about Mubarak's
statements. "We would support
direct talks between Israel and its
Arab neighbors in any way that
seems appropriate at that time."
Kalb refused to comment on
Mubarak's proposal that the U.S.
invite Israel and a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation
to set the framework for negotia-
tions, nor would he comment on
Mubarak's alternative proposal
that he would host such a meeting
in Cairo.
But Kalb said the Reagan Ad-
ministration would discuss the
Middle East process with
Mubarak when the Egyptian
leader visits President Reagan in
Washington. Reagan stressed the
need for direct talks when he met
with King Fand of Saudi Arabia,
Feb. 11-12, who also urged
greater U.S. involvement.
Asked about the Hussein-
Arafat agreement, Kalb said,
"what we have seen so far consti-
tutes a step in the right direction,
but there is a long way to go." He
repeated the need for direct
negotiations based on United Na-
tions Security Council Resolution
242.
Among the differences not
worked out by Hussein and Arafat
are the PLO's rejection of UN
Resolution 242, claiming it was a
valuable basis for a just solution
which would guarantee the Pales-
tinian people's rights. Jordan has
stressed it would stick to this reso-
lution. -
Secondly, the PLO is banking
for self-determination for an in-
dependent state which would
later merge with Jordan while
Amman is in favor of self deter-
mination within a confederation
in relation to the privileged rela-
tions between the Jordanian and
Palestinian peoples.
Thirdly, the PLO and the Jor-
dan have accepted the idea of an
international conference which
would associate the permanent
members of the UN Security
Council and all Arab parties con-
cerned but the PLO has made
clear it would take part in such a
conference as the sole and legiti-
mate representative of the Pales-
tinian people on equal footing
with all other Arab parties while
Jordan has suggested the setting
up of a joint delegation.
In a related development,
Palestinian terrorist chief Abu
Nidal, believed dead since last
November, came back under the
spotlight with an interview given
to a French journalist in which
Nidal claimed his organization
had set as its goal the ,murder of
King Hussein.
In the interview, published in
the monthly France Pays Arabe,
Nidal said his terrorists would in-,
tensify operations against Israel.

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